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 Weird Leftie (knit right-handed)

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T O P I C    R E V I E W
Ratbag Posted - 06/09/2007 : 1:48:48 PM
I know that sounds strange, especially as I am very very left handed, but I honestly knit right handedly. I think it's because I was taught to knit by my Mam & Nan at a every young age, about 4, they always had needles in their hands & I mithered them until they gave in.
The only two things I do differently to any other knitter I know (all right handers)are; I always knit into the back of the st on a K row & I rarely turn the work, so that the rs of the work is facing me when I P a row. Mam say it's like looking at a type writer going back & forth.
Told you I was a weird leftie :-)
20   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
schrafinator Posted - 11/07/2007 : 05:04:59 AM
I am a fairly ambidextrous leftie who knits and crochets right-handed. I was initially taught to knit left handed by a leftie knitter, but then just taught myself to knit right handed becasue it was just so much easier than trying to adapt patterns and switch everything in books, etc.

I throw/catch/use a raquet leftie but bat/golf rightie. I can use a knife and fork "american" or "continental" equally comfortably, but when chopping or slicing with a big chef's knife I am very much left handed. When I was little I used left-handed scissors but quickly learned to use right-handed ones and now using left handed ones feels strange. Chopsticks are for my left hand only. :)

I can use a computer mouse that is set up for right or left-handed use with only a slight loss of coordination with the former.

Wen Posted - 11/03/2007 : 5:07:06 PM
If what I am doing only uses 1 hand then I'm left. However I knit, eat with a knife and fork and other stuff I learnt as a kid that requires 2 hands the same way as a RH person.

Mum also knits right handed but holds the wool in her left hand which looks strange to me. Nana taught me to knit so that I could knit 'properly' according to my Mum.

I can do the purls by knitting back but unlike Sandra I knit into the back on the purl row so the knit row is normal. If I'm doing stocking stitch I often don't turn the work but if it's a combination of knit and purl I do.

Wen

2007 stats: 5 FO, too many WIP, 1 frogpond.
http://photos.yahoo.com/whdayus
Ruby Plaid Posted - 10/25/2007 : 12:46:11 PM
I'm a leftie; I throw with my left hand. Other than that I knit rightie. It doesn't matter if you're weird--in a good way, of course--as long as your stuff looks like it should!

My sassy knitting blog is here: http://www.rubyplaid.com
knittingrunner Posted - 09/20/2007 : 2:58:11 PM
Fabulous volley!
Add me to the lefthanded, ambi, righthanded list!

I knit right handed.

I'm lefthanded for writing and most dominant things like carrying, lifting, etc.

Perhaps this is why I have such difficulties with crochet?!
...I'd bat, golf and play hockey with my right hand/side...

Runner who knits: knitter who runs
tink_r_bell Posted - 09/11/2007 : 12:41:09 PM
Lefties unite! I used to play golf (horribly) right handed, I have always played tennis left handed (that spin is wicked!), eat, write, think left handed. I am always right, not to mention in my right mind! I could not teach my sons how to tie their shoes, but my DH could, and they did graduate from kindergarten (29 and 24 YO respectively now). I am the only lefty in my family for generations. I shamelessly play on my left handedness: screw drivers and bottle tops go the wrong way, could you help please, bat bat bat! And (wait for it...) I knit right handed because 25 years ago that was what my LSO taught. I do sometimes knit backwards, but only after a glass of wine (red please) and a bit of inattention!

Steph ;-}

To err is human, just try not to over do it.
eepster Posted - 09/10/2007 : 10:57:49 PM
I'm naturally ambidextrous (I'm mostly right handed by training though.) I knit back and forth too. When knitting flat stockinette I start by knitting continental right handed and when I get to the end instead of turning and purling I just knit left handed english back.


{o,o}
./)_)
.." "
Jen
http://www.buddhabellyart.com/
http://www.cafepress.com/buddhabellyart
Nitaks2 Posted - 09/09/2007 : 11:42:21 AM
quote:
Originally posted by jenlyon60

I never thought about it that way, but I also learned to crochet before I learned to knit. And I crochet left-handed, so I'm holding the yarn in my right hand when I crochet.


quote:
This whole thread makes me laugh. My boss at the yarn store is left-handed and I'm right-handed and we both knit "opposite". We had each learned to crochet in our youth, and according to our handedness, and when we later learned to knit, found holding the yarn in the hand we were "used" to holding it in made more sense.


Some of my Knitting
http://www.flickr.com/photos/9210915@N05/?saved=1



I'm the same way...I just go with what works for me...( I tried continental...and boy did that feel strange..sort of like trying to write right handed...ugh..never again..)

Nita
jenlyon60 Posted - 09/09/2007 : 08:16:06 AM
I never thought about it that way, but I also learned to crochet before I learned to knit. And I crochet left-handed, so I'm holding the yarn in my right hand when I crochet.


quote:
This whole thread makes me laugh. My boss at the yarn store is left-handed and I'm right-handed and we both knit "opposite". We had each learned to crochet in our youth, and according to our handedness, and when we later learned to knit, found holding the yarn in the hand we were "used" to holding it in made more sense.


Some of my Knitting
http://www.flickr.com/photos/9210915@N05/?saved=1
Momma78239 Posted - 09/08/2007 : 11:00:39 PM
This whole thread makes me laugh. My boss at the yarn store is left-handed and I'm right-handed and we both knit "opposite". We had each learned to crochet in our youth, and according to our handedness, and when we later learned to knit, found holding the yarn in the hand we were "used" to holding it in made more sense.

Anyway, we always have a chuckle at the store when one of the customers asks if I'm left-handed!

-WendyM[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v632/Momma78239/smallspindlepic.gif[/IMG]
And all the women that were wise hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, both of blue, and of purple, and of scarlet, and of fine linen. Exodus 35:25
Knit, Spin, and Crochet at Yarnivore!
Nitaks2 Posted - 09/08/2007 : 08:46:40 AM
Ha! Us lefties are doubly blessed! Think of it like this- the left hand side of the body is controlled by the right side of the brain,right? So, that means we got a double whammy! - In so far as the right side of our brains are the dominant,and, that's where the creativity stuff is housed in the brain...SO, not only are we unique, we're also doubly blessed!

Oh,and as for that stepmother of mine? After I got over being hurt combined with good and angry, I decided I'd just enjoy the creative process and let it take me where ever it wanted to...just to see where it would take me..and so far, it ain't half bad!! (Especially when I get my paws on an antique or vintage stitch pattern, and some really pretty yarn...then, I'm as happy as a lark...- usually I can't wait to see how the stitches and colors come alive...usually,it's a pretty cool thing to see happen before my very eyes!)

Nita
Grey Posted - 09/05/2007 : 08:12:09 AM
People can be a little silly about the handedness issue, especially when they use the word 'can't'.

For example, I'm a right handed person who knits left-handed. How weird is that? There's no good reason for it, I just find it more comfortable, even though I do everything else (including crochet) right-handed. I can knit in the more common direction, which is really useful for doing bobbles and short rows.

Understanding is a three-edged sword
Ratbag Posted - 09/04/2007 : 1:57:35 PM
The more people type, the more I'm grateful I had parents who insisted on me being who & what I am (leftie or rightie wise). Ok, Mam teases & Dad has been known to take knifes off me - he says I look like I'm going to slice my fingers/wrist.

It also proves what I truely believe, nothing is impossible - you can do anything you want, when you put your mind to it.

I just wish the schools I attended taught me to use a fountain pen, instead of telling me it wasn't possible & placed a biro in my hand :-( I know that's going off topic.

One final note, never let the beggers grind you down.

Sandra

I didn't lose my mind, it was mine to give away.
CalamityKat Posted - 09/04/2007 : 10:02:38 AM
I don't think it's uncommon for a leftie to knit "right-handed"---I do, and I know a few others who do so, too. In fact, I've only seen one person knit left-handed (although I have recently learned to knit backwards rather than purl, and I found it very easy, so perhaps I can now say that I *do* knit left-handed). I think because it's a two-handed activity, handedness isn't really an issue in knitting.

My experience has been that handedness doesn't matter in all activities, I think due to variables in complexity of fine motor movements required, whether or not both hands are used, the age at which I learned (or tried to learn), and the availability of left-adapted equipment.

In tennis, badminton, baseball and fencing, I am ambidextrous. I started right-handed because my teachers were right-handed, but in all those sports a left-handed player has an advantage over most opponents, so I had incentive to switch over as soon as I could. Even so, the ambidexterity was helpful for resting tired hands and arms. However, my being left-handed did make it oddly harder to learn the standard maneuvers of fencing (such as a parry 4) because I would forget to reverse directions and instead of guarding my torso would open it wide for attack. ;-) I had to become ambidextrous in shooting because the grips on most firearms are righthanded; however, I actually found it makes no difference how I hold the weapon or pull the trigger as long as I use my leading eye (my left) to aim.

In playing handed musical instruments (cello, violin, guitar, etc.), it is actually the left hand doing the more complex work when they are played "righthanded", so perhaps I had an advantage in learning over the righthanders that would explain my rapid progress in these instruments.

In handwriting, I am absolutely left-handed. I had to write with my right hand when I broke my left wrist in third grade, but my printing was still mostly illegible when the cast finally came off.

I learned to cut right-handed because most of the world's scissors are right-handed, but it required practice.

In embroidery I am right-handed because my right-handed mother taught me to do it and I was old enough to deal; a few years earlier, I utterly failed to learn to hand-sew because my Blue Birds leader tried to make me do it right-handed and I couldn't make my right hand do the fine movements needed.

Learning to crochet, I appear to be very strongly left-handed. I only began to make any progress at all when I realized I should watch the hook and yarn, front on, not the teacher's hands.

Frances
Illegitimi non carborundum.
boothacus Posted - 09/02/2007 : 6:37:59 PM
Telling anyone they "can't" do anything is just plain wrong. It's just a sign of insecurity and petty jealousy if you ask me and I know you didn't but... Even if you didn't show an ability which you obviously do, the comment wasn't meant to do anything but be mean. It is true, we left handed people are slightly more prone to learning disabilities but also given a little extra smarts to compensate or overcome them. I'm a firm believe that anyone can do almost anything though it might be tougher for some, and that half the time all that is really needed is encouragement to get over the rough spots. So I say Knit on darlin' and the surprise might be that someone such as yourself who is so into the true love and history of a subject are an inspiration to others, get more out of it, and are often asked to share their love (such as one woman shows on occasion) because they so shine, have their hearts in the right place and don't have an agenda. My knitted hats off to you Nita! Long may you knit and take the utmost pleasure in it. Believe me, people can tell the difference and that makes your knitting so much more special if you ask me!


--Sarah.
After all, Scarlet, tomorrow IS another day.
Nitaks2 Posted - 08/28/2007 : 4:28:12 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Ratbag

I know that sounds strange, especially as I am very very left handed, but I honestly knit right handedly. I think it's because I was taught to knit by my Mam & Nan at a every young age, about 4, they always had needles in their hands & I mithered them until they gave in.
The only two things I do differently to any other knitter I know (all right handers)are; I always knit into the back of the st on a K row & I rarely turn the work, so that the rs of the work is facing me when I P a row. Mam say it's like looking at a type writer going back & forth.
Told you I was a weird leftie :-)




Well, I'm a lefty too..but, I crochet left handed, and knit right handed- using the British Method (Throwing)...Due to my learning disability, I don't even fool with Continental...even though I am bound and determined to eventually learn how to do Fair Isle and that other color work technique that starts with an I..( Can't remember the name of it off the top of my head..)

At least your Mom didn't tell you you weren't capable of stitching/knitting, crochet,etc...due to being a lefty. - That was one of my Stepmother's favorite things- rub my nose in the fact that I'd NEVER be good enough to have a One Woman Show like one of her daughters did! The totally ironic and comical thing about that futile effort was that I NEVER cared if I ever did a "One Woman Show"!

I guess she never could realize that I was MORE into the idea of doing my part to participate in doing what those other ladies that crafted and stitched before me through out history- AND the idea that a hand made gift means far MORE than just buying something for someone. - To me that meant more than putting on the dog to do some inane show or whatever...I guess, I probably wanted it for different reasons, and I'd like to think for the right reasons...I hope...

As for the type writer thing, I seem to be in the habit of my purling being on the WS, and my garter stitching or whatever on the RS..- it seems to work okay for me, oddly enough! But, yeah, I know the feeling of people looking at you strangely while stitching due to being a lefty!

Nita
Lindakh Posted - 08/28/2007 : 07:20:42 AM
Boothacus - I heartily agree with everything you're saying! I'm left-handed, but I knit and crochet right-handed. When I learned to play golf a couple of years ago, I bought a set of right-handed clubs and learned to golf that way. I figured that it was extremely awkward to hold and swing a club either way, so I didn't want to make it *more* akward by trying to reverse everything th instructor was doing. Same way with knitting.

For me, deciding what hand to use (except eating and writing) has always been pragmatic. When my elementary-school classroom had only one pair of lefty scissors for three lefties to share, I learned to cut right-handed. I say if it works for you, go for it!

Linda
ClimberKnits Posted - 08/27/2007 : 2:18:31 PM
Like so many others above me I write, eat, crochet and hand sew as a leftie. I knit, golf, bat, play hockey as a righty.

I'm trying to learn continental style so that I can complete fair isle projects using both hands. Can anyone tell me about jcc28's lever style? I'm definitely not a thrower, but I tension the yarn in my right hand. I never let go of the right needle, and can knit without too much arm or elbow motion. Sounds like it might be lever style.
boothacus Posted - 08/27/2007 : 1:41:11 PM
Sometimes I wonder if perhaps people just don't stress themselves out a little bit about being left-handed and make things a bit more difficult for themselves. Though left-handed predominantly, I just do whatever thing it is without thinking about it so much since learning something new is a struggle for all of us and it takes time to develop muscle memory no matter which handed you are. After all, we use our non-dominant hands to type and play piano without thought to which handed we are and those things take quite a bit more to master than a knit stitch.
Maybe I think this way because a friend of mind reminds me quite often, "don't let what you can't do keep you from doing what you can do." And my dad reminds me not to find new hurdles to make things harder than they already need to be. I do know that it was a steep learning curve to get the knitting stitch basics to feel natural, but that comes with anything new and I've been so grateful to have kept with it since the last 9 months of learning to knit have been great. I love producing something with my hands, and having something to do that is not only relaxing but highly portable and now becoming sought after. I had a friend see one of my long, wide and warm scarves and ask me to make one for her. Only problem is now I'm going to have a big ego about it. [whatever]

I liked QueenKnitsalot comments!

For me personally, I found that learning things right-handed is easier than trying to do it left-handed as I would get more confused trying to transpose directions or what-have-you from the very common right-handed way to left-handed. Sure it might take a little longer to get comfortable with it, but worth it in the end to not have to add an additional step or "turn things around". Just starting with patterns and such as opposed to just doing my own designs for scarves, afghans and fancy pattern stitches, I would be totally lost if I had to transpose anything. I am becoming at peace with the fact that it takes me a little longer than others to catch on.

But in the end, like Ratbag says, whatever gets the job done or works for you.

Keep on knittin' out there folks - the sanity you save may be your own. hee hee.

--Sarah.
After all, Scarlet, tomorrow IS another day.
Ratbag Posted - 08/02/2007 : 08:22:41 AM
Margaret, I couldn't agree more, we all do things differently. That's what makes us all individuals. To quote the old saying, "If it works, don't knock it"

Sandra

I didn't lose my mind, it was mine to give away
frodosmom Posted - 08/01/2007 : 8:30:38 PM
Looks like there are at least a dozen variations here, so what can we conclude? We can happily knit any way that works.

I don't remember how I learned to knit, but I'm doing it righty and doing most other things lefty. I can write with my right hand and print or draw with the left. The kids in school got a kick out of watching me switch hands when writing on the chalkboard (as an English teacher, I did a lot of that).

Some of y'all crochet lefthanded and knit righthanded as I'm doing. That turns out to be convenient--when one hand gets tired, you can always use the other one.

Margaret as Frodosmom

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