Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: We welcome a succulent Merino from Patagonia
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
 All Forums
 Felting Talk
 General Felting Discussion
 Wonder Washer is coming around

Note: You must be registered in order to post a reply.
To register, click here. Registration is FREE!

Screensize:
UserName:
Password:
Format Mode:
Format: BoldItalicizedUnderlineStrikethrough Align LeftCenteredAlign Right Horizontal Rule Insert HyperlinkInsert Email Insert CodeInsert QuoteInsert List
   
Message:

* HTML is OFF
* Forum Code is ON
Smilies
Smile [:)] Big Smile [:D] Cool [8D] Blush [:I]
Tongue [:P] Evil [):] Wink [;)] Clown [:o)]
Black Eye [B)] Eight Ball [8] Frown [:(] Shy [8)]
Shocked [:0] Angry [:(!] Dead [xx(] Sleepy [|)]
Kisses [:X] Approve [^] Disapprove [V] Question [?]

 
   

T O P I C    R E V I E W
Ceil Posted - 12/18/2011 : 11:30:13 PM
I've convinced my DH that a Wonder Washer would be a fine Christmas present this year. In looking on the Internet:

There are TWO such things, and one is called Wonder Wash.

Wonder Wash is hand-cranked; Wonder Washer is plug in.

Those of you who have this have raved about it. But which type do you have? Thanks!

Ceil
(Ravelry: ceilr)
Time is never a factor when joy is involved.
19   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
anderknit Posted - 04/26/2012 : 08:56:41 AM
scarfitup, I agree w/Shalee/Sharon. You don't need a pillowcase because there's really nothing in the WW to get clogged - there's no drainage system (you have to dump the water out yourself.) I have a mesh drain cover that I use in my sink when I dump the water out, but as Sharon said, you can also just scoop the loose fibers out before you dump the water. I don't think the tennis balls are necessary either.

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
Shalee Posted - 04/26/2012 : 08:06:33 AM
With my first project I knitted 2 samples, each with a different size needle. Both felted great but the one with the larger needles was the best. I don't put anything in with my items to cause friction and don't put the items in a "container". The excess fiber just floats to the surface and I scoop it out and throw it away before dumping the water and felted project in the washing machine to spin out the excess water.

Sharon in NW PA
I always wanted my own library but I didn't realize it would be all knitting books!


scarfitup Posted - 04/26/2012 : 04:29:59 AM
So I got my WW yesterday and felted a bag - because my old washing machine died and the new one doesn't seem to give me the control I need for felting! I put the bag in a pillowcase and possibly too much water and 3 tennis balls with holes drilled in (as per some other research I did). I prefer a mesh lingerie bag but was warned to contain the fibers so as not to damage the mechanism of the WW.

It felted! BUT....it also felted unevenly and parts of it stuck together and had to be pulled, coaxed with a knife, and reshaped. It was also creased. Do you think the pillowcase is too big, too much water, too many tennis balls (or perhaps none are needed?) So many questions and so much work to keep on experimenting! Doesn't the pillowcase cause all those loose fibers to felt back onto the piece?

Any more suggestions? Soaking seems to be a good idea. Knitting up a size sounds perfect (faster production!)

Want to see the resulting photos? https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.3426446792100.138658.1598192645&type=1

Scarf It Up!
http://scarf-it-up.blogspot.com
http://flickr.com/photos/scarfitup
http://scarfitup.etsy.com
Become a Scarf It Up! Fan on FB: http://www.facebook.com/scarfitupwilmington
anderknit Posted - 01/17/2012 : 7:02:10 PM
Yup - that's what I have heard and what I said (on another thread, I guess.) Looser knitting felts better. Go figure. Maybe more "room" for agitation between stitches? Anyway, I'm glad you're getting the results you want, finally!

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
Ceil Posted - 01/16/2012 : 7:50:02 PM
Latest update: I knitted two identical samples with Noro Kureyon. Washed the first in the Wonder Washer in about a quart of water. The second went in our regular washer, in a pillowcase cover, with about 4 >gallons< of water and a pair of old jeans. I had to know what the difference would be. Well, the WW sample shrank MORE. Both of them took a long time to felt. Kureyon is like that. I had even better success going up another needle size on a third sample: stitch definition is close to gone, which didn't happen with either of the first two.

I'm keeping this thing.

Ceil
(Ravelry: ceilr)
Time is never a factor when joy is involved.
Ceil Posted - 01/11/2012 : 9:42:32 PM
quote:
Originally posted by purlthis

What did you use with it for friction?

Rachel


I'm trying again with another swatch at the moment (a small gift bag, first project in "Felted Knits" by Bev Gelaskas, if anyone has that), with a whole lot LESS water, like about a quart. I also soaked the yarn for 30 minutes in a metal bowl atop the warming burner on the stove. A good soaking beforehand couldn't hurt.

I think the water amount is the trick, because this puppy is FELTING. No need to add anything else to help agitate. The ribbed sides on the bucket create adequate agitation, as long as there isn't too much water.

The water got cool after 45 minutes, so I threw swatch and brew into a glass Pyrex container and then put that in the microwave for a couple minutes, then dumped it all back in the bucket (no it wasn't too hot, but this is something to be careful with). Admittedly, I took the lid off the bucket to watch, and the piece literally twirls around on the outside wall of the bucket. So, maybe there's some success here. Anderknit said to add water to cover. For this small a piece, I've gone less than that (which means soaking beforehand is perhaps an even better idea). Anyway, thanks for the tips. This may just be a keeper.

Ceil
(Ravelry: ceilr)
Time is never a factor when joy is involved.
anderknit Posted - 01/03/2012 : 7:46:22 PM
I just want to mention that I've never added anything to my Wonder Washer for friction. I've used Patons Classic Wool and Brown Sheep's Lamb's Pride (Worsted) and Noro something or other and not had problems.

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
purlthis Posted - 01/02/2012 : 7:56:24 PM
What did you use with it for friction?

Rachel
------------------------------------------------------
As I get older, I prefer to knit. Tracey Ullman
http://purledthis.blogspot.com/ UPDATED! WITH PICS!
Ceil Posted - 01/02/2012 : 7:52:48 PM
What I need to know is how big your project was before washing and how much water you used. Also how long the felting took. I'm wondering if this first piece was just too small.

Ceil
(Ravelry: ceilr)
Time is never a factor when joy is involved.
Shalee Posted - 12/31/2011 : 10:33:07 PM
I haven't had any problems felting in mine. Used hot water from the tap. The yarn I use for my felting projects is unspun Icelandic, from School House Press. Felts right up for me.

Sharon in NW PA
I always wanted my own library but I didn't realize it would be all knitting books!


Ceil Posted - 12/31/2011 : 5:31:57 PM
I used hot water from the tap--it was pretty hot! I do wonder about the water level. I guess what surprised me is how this machine agitates: It swirls the water one way for a few seconds, stops and goes the other way for the same amount of time. That doesn't seem like agitation to me.

Ceil
(Ravelry: ceilr)
Time is never a factor when joy is involved.
purlthis Posted - 12/31/2011 : 12:55:33 PM
Do you heat the water yourself? I would wonder if the temp was possibly too cool?

Rachel
------------------------------------------------------
As I get older, I prefer to knit. Tracey Ullman
http://purledthis.blogspot.com/ UPDATED! WITH PICS!
anderknit Posted - 12/31/2011 : 11:17:00 AM
I have never had a problem felting in mine - my girls and I have made several bags, coasters, and clogs. If anything, you might have had too much water? I always read to put in just enough hot water to cover the piece, and just a drop or two of soap. After the 15 minute cycle, if needed, I would dump the water out and start again with hot water just to cover the piece. I also would make sure that the piece didn't get stuck in one spot in the washer and not agitate. Beyond that, I can't say. It couldn't be the yarn or your water, since the piece felted in your regular machine.

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
Ceil Posted - 12/31/2011 : 12:04:14 AM
Well, it came today, so I just HAD to knit something to felt. My felted Moebius bag needs a pocket for my cell phone, so the piece startd out at about 8 inches around (4" across) and 6 inches tall, using the same yarn as the bag, so I knew it would felt. I put the piece in a mesh bag because live stitches are threaded onto plastic tubing for attaching the piece to the bag later and I didn't want the tubing to get entangled in any way.

I washed and washed it, and it barely shrank. I started with hot water and some Eucalan, and when it cooled down, I dumped it and put in more hot water and Eucalan. I don't know if there was enough water in there, or if it needed more, but the piece wouldn't shrink past a certain point. Then I threw in a small towel to give the piece something to bounce off of. No change. I tried Standard and Gentle cycle; didn't make any difference. Finally, I tossed the piece and water into the top-loading washing with the usual old pair of jeans--and it shrank like mad almost immediately.

What did I do wrong? Does the washer need more water? Is it where I live? Or the water? Was the piece too small? Frankly, I'm ready to send this back!

Ceil
(Ravelry: ceilr)
Time is never a factor when joy is involved.
anderknit Posted - 12/20/2011 : 6:36:53 PM
Ah, Sharon, I am still doing laundry for a family of four. And I work during the week, so we save it all for the weekend and do mass loads one after the other! But I see your point. Someday...

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
Shalee Posted - 12/20/2011 : 12:33:50 PM
anderknit, you would save on your electric bill if you did your small loads in it. I live alone and don't always have a load to add the socks to, so the WW is my answer.

Sharon in NW PA
I always wanted my own library but I didn't realize it would be all knitting books!


anderknit Posted - 12/19/2011 : 6:06:11 PM
I got the Wonder Washer a couple of years ago (the plug-in one.) We have made several felted bags, pairs of clogs, and coasters in it. It takes a little while, but it definitely works. I too have a front loader and was warned not to felt in it. I would recommend Wonder Washer for felting, definiitely. I have never tried to wash clothing in it - I don't know why I would want to.

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
Shalee Posted - 12/19/2011 : 09:50:42 AM
I have one and love it! I use it for my socks, underwear and originally purchased it for smallish felting. I don't think it would hold a larger felting project. I researched all of the small washers before buying mine and decided the Wonder Washer would be perfect, and it is!

Last weekend, at the knitting group get-to-gether one of the gals said she has the
Wonder Washer spinner. I think she mentioned it was hand crank. I was not aware of that item. I have a Neptune stackable front loading washer & dryer that has the heavy duty spin cycle in the washer. I just dump the contents of the WW directly in my washer and set it to heavy duty spin and that gets all the water out. I use Eucalan to do the wash in the WW. I hang my washed items on an old fashioned drying rack and they are dry in no time. I know I have saved, in electrical costs, the amount I paid for the WW by using the WW and drying rack.

Sharon in NW PA
I always wanted my own library but I didn't realize it would be all knitting books!

Edited to add: I am going to begin washing my turtlenecks individually in the WW. I am hoping it will be more gentle and thus less pilling, overall. I did buy one of those plastic storage-under-the-bed containers for washing my nicer sweat shirts. Again, the Eucalan + sweat shirt to soak, then washer for spin.

The WW has a timer that sets for any of the following: 3, 6, 9, 12 or 15 minutes. I've been using the 15 minute cycle, but think 9 would be fine. I remember reading, someplace, that clothes shouldn't need any more than 10 minutes to get clean.


BlueNuthatch Posted - 12/19/2011 : 06:27:56 AM
I did a search and it appears to me that it's electric and called the Wonder Washer. the poster, NaProus links a picture of it in the first post on this thread: http://www.knittersreview.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=86600
this is the pic NaProus posted of it http://tinyurl.com/2dx9q7

But if you do a search for Wonder Washer you will find many threads that talk about it, some include links with pics of it.

Hope this helps.


Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.44 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe