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T O P I C    R E V I E W
Lynne604 Posted - 11/12/2012 : 4:14:37 PM
I am at the season of life where the older generation is rapidly passing away. Only my 82-year-old father and his brother are left and I cherish them -- but I really miss my aunts and uncles who are gone. It must be the upcoming holidays that have me so melancholy. That and the time change.

Thanksgiving was always our family reunion holiday. "Over the river and through the woods/To grandfather's house we go." Most songs have it as "grandmother's house" but in the original poem, it is "grandfather's house." I know those who are gone would not want me to be gloomy.

Anyone else miss how things used to be?
15   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Grand-moogi Posted - 12/01/2012 : 07:18:06 AM
I flatly refuse to get a smart phone. The main thing I dislike is that they have touch screens and my husband is always turning his off or accidentally calling someone or doing weird things to his because something touches a spot on the screen. He turns it off while he is talking on it because his ear touches the screen or he does something stupid to it as he picks it up because you have to get hold of the thing and his fingers touch the screen.
I reckon his smart phone is too smart for its own good. It causes him so much frustration I do not understand why he persists with it.

I knit a hug into every stitch
donnawatk Posted - 11/29/2012 : 05:05:24 AM
Grand-moogi, I was in a store were my sons works when I heard him tell a customer if you order this online it will be 40 dollars cheaper. Have it come here and go now in the back and pick it up. The guy says how do I do that and Im here. My son says on your phone. I guess he had a smart phone that one of his grand kids had given him and didn't know how to do anything but answer it. My son walked him thru it. This man says thank you for showing me hows it works, when my son says you are about my mom age and she can't work her phone either. He right all I do on my phone is answer when it rings, I don't need all the other stuff. Donna
donnawatk Posted - 11/29/2012 : 04:49:57 AM
Lynne, Christmas always makes me think of my Dad and Grandmother both left me a year apart. My dad was an only child, Christmas was a big deal for him because he didnt have sister and brother around. He would wake us all up at 5am and beat us to the tree. I think he had the best time shaking boxes. Last year was the fist Christmas without him we were all up at five under the tree and laughing like he was there.Donna
Nanaknit Posted - 11/20/2012 : 12:52:03 PM
I feel you, Moogie. I almost need glasses to find my glasses in the morning and had to get an "old lady" alarm clock with HUGE numbers on it lol.

Linda

"Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't."
-Eleanor Roosevelt
Grand-moogi Posted - 11/20/2012 : 04:19:14 AM
I was trying to sew something on the machine once and simply could not thread the needle. I had to go in next door and get one of the young girls from there to come and thread it for me.

I knit a hug into every stitch
lucybug Posted - 11/19/2012 : 10:55:54 AM
It's really funny how your perspective changes as you grow older. I was telling someone the other day how my grandmother would ask me to thread needles because she couldn't see the eye. I would do it without commenting but would think to myself that it was really strange that she couldn't do it. Now I'm the one that can't thread a needle without help (I have a little gadget that I use -- when I can find it!).
Lynne604 Posted - 11/19/2012 : 09:21:28 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Ditzy Girl

My brother and I talk about this that we are now the older generation and how did that happen. One minute you are a kid and then you are them, the older people who talk about their health all the time. A ache here a pain there. How did this happen? It just kinda sneaks up on ya, but for me the holidays are a time for lovely memories with my friends and my brother. It's a remember when time.

Zola, Seattle, Wash.





Talk about aches and pains - as a child I had to hug my great-grandmother whenever we visited her. "Go over and give Mamaw a big hug!" I didn't want to because she smelled "funny." It wasn't until I was an adult that I realized the smell was Ben-Gay. Now I have arthritis and also smell "funny"!
Nanaknit Posted - 11/17/2012 : 10:10:08 AM
I think this time of year brings memories of years past to all of us. I miss the smell of coffee in my Grandparent's kitchen as the family gathered for a holiday meal. My Grandfather, mother and I shared a birthday party each year because our birthdays were so close. My mom and grandpa are gone now, and my birthday just isn't the same. My father is all that remains of the "older" generations in our immediate family. When he is gone, my brother, sister and I will become the older generation.

During the holidays, our family gatherings almost always include friends or acquaintances who have no where else to spend the holiday. These honored guests become part of our loud and demonstrative family for the day. This is one of the ways that we continue to make new memories for all of us; but most importantly, for the younger generations in our family to remember through the years.


Linda

"Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't."
-Eleanor Roosevelt
knittingrunner Posted - 11/16/2012 : 10:01:57 PM
Honor your memories but remember to create new ones.

My siblings and I are on the cusp of being the 'senior' vanguard of the family, we have experienced loss and familial upheaval that has forced creation of new traditions. These may not feel the same as the traditions of our youth but they are something we have created that carry something from the past while weaving in pieces from in-laws and new experiences.



Bike, Knit, (run)!
knittingbiker on Ravelry
Grand-moogi Posted - 11/16/2012 : 10:05:10 AM
Ah yes, I see. I am into that stage too. There is only my Dad, all his siblings are gone and one aunt in the older generation. We are the senior generation now. I dread the time when our generation starts to go.


I knit a hug into every stitch
Ditzy Girl Posted - 11/16/2012 : 08:14:42 AM
My brother and I talk about this that we are now the older generation and how did that happen. One minute you are a kid and then you are them, the older people who talk about their health all the time. A ache here a pain there. How did this happen? It just kinda sneaks up on ya, but for me the holidays are a time for lovely memories with my friends and my brother. It's a remember when time.

Zola, Seattle, Wash.

Lynne604 Posted - 11/15/2012 : 6:07:24 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Grand-moogi

It is hard when your peers pass away but there is a bright side. I do not mean to be flippant but sometimes a smile helps when we are feeling down.
Asked what was the best part of being so old, a lady answered "No peer pressure"

I knit a hug into every stitch



It is not my peers passing away but the older generation -- my parents' brothers and sisters. All are gone now but Dad and his brother.
Grand-moogi Posted - 11/15/2012 : 05:35:57 AM
It is hard when your peers pass away but there is a bright side. I do not mean to be flippant but sometimes a smile helps when we are feeling down.
Asked what was the best part of being so old, a lady answered "No peer pressure"

I knit a hug into every stitch
Catlover Posted - 11/13/2012 : 10:13:52 AM
The holidays seem to remind us of the passing of time more than other times of the year. My cousins and I have reconnected after many years of not getting around to communicating. Although we still do it infrequently, emails and phone calls still mean a lot. My 93 year old mother is the last of that generation and all of us are only too well aware of it. Like Shalee, I have made friends with some younger people and, although we aren't close friends, they still brighten my day.
Shalee Posted - 11/12/2012 : 5:15:38 PM
Yes, we do reach that point in our life when our dear friends and relatives are leaving us. There comes a time when there are no more family gatherings. Friends who live a distance away are called, only to find out they have passed on. The phone rings and you look at the caller ID, thinking oh, that is so and so. You answer only to hear that person's son or daughter. You know instantly they are gone.

It isn't easy and it won't get any easier as more and more pass away. My solution? I make friends with those who are younger than me! I am the oldest knitter in our group, of hand knitters, and I even manage to keep up with them!





Sharon in NW PA
I always wanted my own library but I didn't realize it would be all knitting books!



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