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 What are good first projects for new knitters?
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JacquieK
New Pal

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2004 :  12:59:52 PM  Show Profile Send JacquieK a Private Message
I have already finished a scarf that turned out well- although it is only in the knit stitch. I'm just wanting to know.
Thanks,
Jacquie

Julie914
Gabber Extraordinaire

481 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2004 :  1:15:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Julie914's Homepage Send Julie914 a Private Message
"The Knit Stitch" by Sally Melville has a lot of great patterns in it with minimal shaping. Your local libary would have a copy.

Or poke around the internet for squareish clothing patterns (clothes without much shaping are much much much easier to knit). I'm looking at knitting myself a kimono -- no shaping, just five rectangles of different sizes.

I'd say for simplicity, start with something rather square and one color, and go from there. Most pattern books (again, hit your local library) will have at least one or two like that in them.

Happy knitting!
Julie

I'd try recreational drugs, but they'd cut into my yarn budget.
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Luann
Permanent Resident

USA
2678 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2004 :  1:16:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Luann's Homepage Send Luann a Private Message
My first project was a scarf, using knit and purl stitches. After that, I went right on to a sweater! I say, find something fairly simple (hat, sweater, another scarf) that will still challenge you to learn at least one new skill. It seems like a lot of beginners make the mistake of doing tons of garter stitch scarves and then burn out and give up out of boredom. Do you have a good basic book?

Luann

Knit and let knit!
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A10CO
Gabber Extraordinaire

577 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2004 :  1:21:46 PM  Show Profile Send A10CO a Private Message
I would suggest you get a "basics" book with some patterns in it that you like. I like the Stitch N beach book a lot for guidance as well as interesting designs.
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kimkrafty
Permanent Resident

USA
2145 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2004 :  2:52:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit kimkrafty's Homepage Send kimkrafty a Private Message
You may even want to head to the book store or library and take a peek at a few knitting books geared toward beginners.

I ended up buying Melanie Falick's Knitting for Babies which has great patterns, but they are for babies, of course.

I also have Sally Melville's The Knit Stitch, Sally Melville's The Purl Stitch and Vogue Knitting on the Go Beginner Basics. (All Beginner books with patterns )

Flipping through a book with patterns designed for beginners, you may find they have something that inspires you but is not too complex.

OR---you could try searching for beginner/easy patterns on the internet, seeing what jumps out at you.

OR---decide how challenged you'd like to be, learn different techniques and terms, pick a pattern that calls out to you--making sure all the terms in it are familiar to you, and work through it slowly.

A local yarn shop or knitting guild can be helpful if you've got one near you. Just remember if you didn't buy the yarn at the shop, it's probably a good idea to ask questions elsewhere, or make the questions general ones.

I'm doing baby stuff cuz it's small and a couple of afghans. One afghan is patchwork, so I just practice patterns of different stitches to make up each block. Then when I'm done they'll be joined to make the afghan. The other afghan is a garter stitch afghan with an eyelet border. It's kind of mindless but I can get in lots of knitting to help get my tension nice and even for once I try a sweater.

A few people here teach knitting and may be able to suggest some really good projects for you.

The world is your oyster. Good luck picking a project.

Happy Knitting!

Kimberly, kniting in VA
WIP: 4 FO: 0
Finished Patchworks Squares: 7
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Julie914
Gabber Extraordinaire

481 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2004 :  3:10:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Julie914's Homepage Send Julie914 a Private Message
AND ANOTHER THING!! -- tee hee.

Pick something that really sets you on fire. Don't go with a project that you figure will be knit-to-learn... even if you learn you'll be bored out of your head. I made that mistake myself once or twice. Never again.

Julie

I'd try recreational drugs, but they'd cut into my yarn budget.
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Wen
Permanent Resident

Australia
3244 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2004 :  3:11:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit Wen's Homepage Send Wen a Private Message
I would do a dropped shoulder sweater. That way you don't have the hassle of sewing in sleeves and making sure the sleeve cap fits but you get the satisfaction of making something that has some shaping, and you get to wear when it is finished.

Choose a fairly smooth yarn, nothing fluffy or with eyelashes so you can see your stitches. My first sweater I used a DK weight wool.

Stitch'n'beach does have some good patterns that are not too challenging.

Wen

2004 stats: 4 FO, 5 WIP, 13 wool purchased. 2 frogpond
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2004 :  7:39:54 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
If you can cast on, knit, and make an increase (even a YO is okay,)and bind off, You can make a top down sweater on circular needles. There are even free patterns on the web. If you are not sure you can handle that, start with a hat. The stitches are the same. The reason I recommend doing a circular sweater is that it is easier to learn to use circular needles than it is to learn to sew seams. The secret bonus is that doing only knit stitches makes stockinette when it is done in a circle. With only the knit stitch it would have rolled neckline, bottom and cuffs. If you can also purl, you can do ribbed edges.

fran
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BessH
Permanent Resident

3095 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  03:51:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit BessH's Homepage Send BessH a Private Message
I agree with fran - especially knit a hat. I start all my beginner knitting students with a hat, unless they insist upon something more challenging. It's small. You can try different things, ribbing, increases and decreases, patternwork. And it's impressive. Try the book Hats On! for some fascinating hat designs. Or scope out the internet.

If a human sized sweater daunts you - try a doll sweater. And yes - I am a big advocate of circular knitting - though all knitting techniques are worth knowing.

Bess
http://likethequeen.blogspot.com
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sewcrazy1000
New Pal

11 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  04:30:18 AM  Show Profile Send sewcrazy1000 a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Dooie3of6@aol.com

"The Knit Stitch" by Sally Melville has a lot of great patterns in it with minimal shaping. Your local libary would have a copy.

Or poke around the internet for squareish clothing patterns (clothes without much shaping are much much much easier to knit). I'm looking at knitting myself a kimono -- no shaping, just five rectangles of different sizes.

I'd say for simplicity, start with something rather square and one color, and go from there. Most pattern books (again, hit your local library) will have at least one or two like that in them.

Happy knitting!
Julie

I'd try recreational drugs, but they'd cut into my yarn budget.




I agree...I've been checking out the library collection here in Montgomery County and there's a pretty darn good supply of pattern books to check out. The Berocco website also has some good (free) online patterns that are easy, too, if you want to start something like a top. Of course, I've been knitting only since September, and I'm just now braving into the adult pullover knitting realm.


Judy in C.C.

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celia
Permanent Resident

Australia
2454 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  06:30:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit celia's Homepage Send celia a Private Message
I got back into knitting last year. Prior to that i had been taught to knit as a child (only knit and purl stitches and only in a straight line without increases or decreases). I had made a dropped shoulder sweater when I was in Highschool. I found that t be a great project for a beginner. it was like knitting two rectangles and two sleeves and joining it all together. The best part of it was that the sweater was like a textured stitch sampler. It was a Patons pattern and i dont have it anymore. But based on my exprience, any simple sweater would be great because you get the satisfaction of having made something a bit more complex than just a scarf.
Since I started knitting again last year, I have bough both of the Sally Melville books, the harmony guide (vol 1), and stitch and beach. i also have the knitters almanac, which is not so much of a beginner's book. I have found the patterns in the sally melville books simple and useable. I think a good reference book is always handy. Even now, i find hat i go back to these books to check details.
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Josh A.
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
561 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  07:39:19 AM  Show Profile  Visit Josh A.'s Homepage Send Josh A. a Private Message
Hi Jacquie,

The first thing my BF and I did was knit really lame scarves... we tried knitting, purling, and knit-two-together decreasing (because we cast on wayyy too many stitches) and ended up with two THINGS we keep to laugh at every once in a while.

The next thing I tried was a drop stitch scarf... which uses only the knit stitch, albeit with a bit of modification. ;-) That came out well.

Then a 2x2 ribbed scarf. Knit two stitches, purl two stitches. That was good practice for bringing the yarn back and forth when switching stitch types.

After that we were sick of scarves and decided to try hats. We used this hat pattern: http://www.hjsstudio.com/hat.html

We've made two hats each with it and are fairly pleased. The last one I did, I started out with fancy eyelash yarn for the cuff, then switched to plain wool for the rest of it.

OH, and we tried to make hand puppets with this pattern: http://patriot.net/~annette/patterns/puppets/index.html but I think it's kind of messed up :(

Currently I'm going to start my first feling project (I'm felting the swatches today!) and he's working on a scarf for his sister made of eyelash yarn on size 15 needles.

So that's where I've been. Maybe it will give you some ideas for where you want to go next. Best of luck!




Josh A.
N. California -> Rochester, NY
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iknitabit
New Pal

USA
20 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  11:32:43 AM  Show Profile Send iknitabit a Private Message
Hi...I started with scarves and hats...great ways to learn different stitches and (with hats) to learn how to use circulars and double-pointeds. From there, I went to a sweater with very little shaping...and then...well, the sky's the limit!!!

Good Luck!!!

"If you are all wrapped up in yourself... you are overdressed!"
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bethgirl@georgiadogs.com


Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  11:35:34 AM  Show Profile Send bethgirl@georgiadogs.com a Private Message
I just started knitting in the fall, and my first project was the Villa poncho on www.knitty.com. Look at their archives, and anything labeled "mellow" is pretty tame. I wanted to do something cool that I could actually WEAR, rather than something like a washcloth, which many web sites say is "a great first project"...don't think so! The poncho was great...it was simple, just plain ol' knitting all the way, and I've gotten SO MANY compliments on it!

Have fun! I've gotten totally hooked on knitting since I started!!!
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ohoney
New Pal

USA
36 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  11:47:49 AM  Show Profile Send ohoney a Private Message
I did dishcloths. Small projects that work up really fast. There is no lack of imagination thou. You can do lacey ones, cables or triangle up and then down for squares. My little girl loves these for her dolls. I know where they are when they have gone missing all I need to do is go check her room. Here is a good link for dishcloths http://www.jimsyldesign.com/~dishbout/kpatterns/knitting.html

I like the idea of knitting min sweaters to learn you can make them for dolls, bears, or even babies as these work up faster then an adult one.



Marie
Joplin Missouri USA
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCozyKitten
it's new and i would love you to join.

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jrpalermo
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  12:09:39 PM  Show Profile Send jrpalermo a Private Message
I'm sure a scarf was my first project many years ago, but then went on to knit myself a lovely pair of angora two-needle mittens. It was a fairly easy project and was just what my 11-year old soul desired! So pick a fairly easy project (not too big, minimal shaping, plain garter or stockinette stitch)that you love!
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chrisknits
New Pal

USA
45 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  12:42:47 PM  Show Profile Send chrisknits a Private Message
First thing I made was a baby doll blanket. Then I made a baby sweater. They are the best because the small size is a quick knit and the shaping/techniques/methods are the same for an adult sweater. Oh, and it was Fair Isle-not a usual beginner item. But it really wasn't hard, just tricky to handle until you became used to it. And I learned a lot from the experience!

Chris
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eclaire26


Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  12:45:32 PM  Show Profile Send eclaire26 a Private Message
I would generally agree with what everyone else has said, except for one thing: If you are a new knitter, don't use a free pattern off the internet! Generally, they are not very good, and have not gone through the test knititng and editing that published patterns have. I used to work in a yarn shop, and would get quite frustrated when new knitters would bring in internet patterns, and ask us for help in figuring them out. We would always, help them, but in their desire to save $3-5, they would often be very frustrated because the patterns were written so poorly. Just buy a good pattern and consider it part of the investment along with the yarn. It is worth it in terms of the frustration you won't have to deal with!
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momknits
New Pal

47 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  1:57:35 PM  Show Profile Send momknits a Private Message
I've seen in the classes I've taught that boredom or confusion over directions are very discouraging to beginners. If you have a knitting friend or relative handy or a LYS with kind, helpful assistants than you might pick something a bit challenging, but definately small. I must agree that a hat is a great project. I'd suggest circular and double point needles rather than doing it flat and sewing a seem. You can choose different edges, stitches and top finishes or simply make a plain little rolled edge beanie. If it's not your cup of tea you might still go for a hat and begin your Christmas knitting. As thrilling as a sweater is when it's finished, time and again I see it's too long of a project when you're just starting out plus a lot of the shapeless, chunky (beginner) sweaters teach a new knitter so little that they would have learned more doing a dishcloth. If you absolutely love stockinette stitch or have no one to help if you run into a problem than one of those sweaters may be very appealing. I tell everyone that is knitting a sweater to have a small project to work on too. Each time you finish a small project it spurs you on to continue with your sweater. In my humble opinion, Cheryl
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Trina
Permanent Resident

USA
1871 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  3:12:16 PM  Show Profile Send Trina a Private Message
Great beginner projects are scarves. I also love washcloths because you can start out with simple stitches & learn others as you make more washcloths. These are 2 easy & quick ideas.

Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly.
-Langston Hughes
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Julie914
Gabber Extraordinaire

481 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2004 :  5:07:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Julie914's Homepage Send Julie914 a Private Message
You know. The Yarn Over is arguably the easiest increase to do... and if you put a row of them up, say, the underside of a sleeve, you could (after finishing) thread ribbon through them and have A Unique Design Element on your very first sweater that looks really hard!

Hmm. Next time I teach a sweater, I might very well do that. LOL
Julie

I'd try recreational drugs, but they'd cut into my yarn budget.
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