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alohaopal@hawaii.rr.com
New Pal

7 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  10:21:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit alohaopal@hawaii.rr.com's Homepage Send alohaopal@hawaii.rr.com a Private Message
So far the most difficult technique I've learned to do has been the cast-on for toe-up socks. I don't thikn it's because of a specific technique though, somehow I became really afraid of doing toe-up socks. It was a completely irrational fear but I finally conquered it this year. I haven't finished the socks, but I really enjoy the technique.



Opal

http://alohaopal.typepad.com/
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luv2knit944
Permanent Resident

USA
1789 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  10:38:23 AM  Show Profile Send luv2knit944 a Private Message
Intarsia and Fair Isle are impossible for me.I just can`t seem to carry the yarn across the row like it should be done.That & continental knitting style is what I`d love to learn.Can`t afford classes.:)

Pauline
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iknitabit
New Pal

USA
20 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  10:51:41 AM  Show Profile Send iknitabit a Private Message
I am knitting socks with DPN for the first time...however, I have RIPPED out what I have done about six times so far. I am determined, however, to finish these socks. I have to admit that I feel like I am knitting an octopus :-)

Oh well....carry on.

"If you are all wrapped up in yourself... you are overdressed!"
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socklady


Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  11:28:37 AM  Show Profile Send socklady a Private Message
hullo,
one of the hardest things for me was entrelac. i knit a few things, and they were okay. but when i knit that sweater in knitters oh, a few years back, and i finished it... i knew i had mastered something. i can even do it in the round now. knitting from charts was the best thing that ever happened for me. i knit some sweater from vogue back in '91 from a chart, and never looked back. i even had the nerve to knit the sweater in the round. i love it. i have not done intarsia yet, but i knit fair isle in the round and use only my left hand. i tried both hands, but my shoulder hurt. i won't knit fair isle flat. i hate purling and changeing colors. the absolute hardest thing for me is still selveges. i won't take the tkga course. i have the paperwork, did up the swatches, but i won't send them in. i hate my edges. they are not perfect. that's why i knit in the round. i love aran work. and... i learned to do steeks which were not hard, but freaked me out totally. they turned out fine, but my heart, my breath, must have stopped as the scissors sliced through the yarn. but selveges...
jacqueline
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socklady


Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  11:32:26 AM  Show Profile Send socklady a Private Message
oh, i forgot,
short rows. i cannot do them. no matter what the short row technique, i see holes. i know the holes are there. i want short rows without holes. period. i want it to look like my heel flap. no holes. zilch. i have looked at my store bought socks... short rows, and... there are holes. teeny weeny holes. i guess i can do short rows. i am just not happy with the way it turns out. i short rowed a bust on a leotard i knit up. looked great. shortrowed a bag. looked great. shortrowed socks, looks awful.
jacqueline
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janiebug@charter.net


Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  12:36:15 PM  Show Profile Send janiebug@charter.net a Private Message
I thought it was "kitchenering" my sock toes until I started estonian lace. Haven't got around to fair isle or entrelac yet! Maybe I should just stick to garter stitch scarves or afghans! janiebug
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brendamyfrienda
Warming Up

USA
59 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  6:19:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit brendamyfrienda's Homepage Send brendamyfrienda a Private Message
By far the hardest thing I've done is the heel part on two socks on two circulars at the same time! Whew!
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purlie
New Pal

6 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  6:22:43 PM  Show Profile Send purlie a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by fmarrs

Working to gauge and making things that fit. Once conquerred, I felt on top of the world! The self confidence of knowing I could pick up needles and something would turn out just as I planned it was mind boggling. I even challenged myself by making a child's sweater and checking the gauge only once with no further measurements until it was finished. All the while I was knitting, I was visualizing one major trip to the frog pond, but when it was finished and measured right on as planned and fit. I finally believed that I could knit things and they would come out the size I wanted.

fran

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purlie
New Pal

6 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  6:27:43 PM  Show Profile Send purlie a Private Message
i agree with fmarrs that knitting so the garment fits after all that work is the hardest part. I can spend two evenings just knitting a swatch at the right guage and checking the measurements and make the adaptions. I knit 3-4 sweaters a year so it is important to get it right. making a guage swatch is the key... after that things fall into place. Also is knowing when to rip it out and starting over. getting the courage to pull out a few days work is so necessary when it doesn't look or fit correctly . it is always worth it to rip.
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frodosmom
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
480 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  7:18:59 PM  Show Profile Send frodosmom a Private Message
Kitchener cast-on had me baffled. After a couple of trials I was about to give up. Then I realized I had read the instructions incorrectly. Suddenly it made sense and I could do it with a bit of practice.

What's interesting about this thread: most of us have met something that challenged us. But we solved the problem or mastered the technique if we worked at it. So if you're a beginner struggling to get to the next level of skill, well, we've all been there. Half the fun of knitting, I think, is in watching our growing mastery.

Margaret in South Carolina
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KarenCG
New Pal

5 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  08:22:39 AM  Show Profile Send KarenCG a Private Message
The most difficult technique for me to learn in knitting was to knit using the double point needles. Casting on was the hardest. There was a baby blanket I wanted to knit so I got one of my many reference books and began practicing. Within a couple of days I began to get the hang of it and started knitting the baby blanket. I must say it came out perfectly and I sold it to a friend.

KarenCG
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Debbie Mo
New Pal

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  11:30:03 AM  Show Profile Send Debbie Mo a Private Message
Opal:

Funny you mention cast on for toe up socks, because I started doing toe up socks to avoid kitchner stitching the toes! On my first sock, I managed to kitchner the toe perfectly, but have never been able to do it again.

Elizabeth Zimmerman has very clear instructions in one of her books (I think Knitters Almanac), and it seemed really easy compared to other instructions I have seen that I think I'll be able to do it on my next pair of socks.

Debbie Mo
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Knit Twit
Chatty Knitter

USA
257 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  11:39:29 AM  Show Profile Send Knit Twit a Private Message
So far, having the patience to do intarsia properly has been the most difficult thing for me (I taught myself with a book). The first time I did it, I got lazy and thought, "Hey, I can just pull this across the back... ." Of course, when I was finished, the entire thing was disturbingly puckered. Now, I know better, but weaving in all those ends still tries my patience.

Terri :)

Discretionary Spending = Yarn and Teddy Bears
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Mermaid Knits
Permanent Resident

USA
1129 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  2:23:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mermaid Knits's Homepage Send Mermaid Knits a Private Message
About 15 years back I vainly set forth to help out a dear friend who owned a yarn shop. The client wanted a Vincent Van Gogh painting, rendered in wool in the front centre of a plain black pullover. I wanted a knitting project and was not in a position to know what I was getting into. You see, I used a radio-phone to call from a remote bush camp with an emergency! I finished my original project (that I had brought in with me) and my yarn and needed a new project - but quick.

So this box shows up, unloaded from the float plane with a huge chart of the painting of the Portuguese fishing boats (like 10 to 20 brightly coloured boats) pulled up onto a beach. Every colour of the universe was in that box (before Hubble space telescope even discovered these wavelengths!!). I had one row that wound up having 17 colours on it, I kid you not. So it was intarsia work and umpteen colours per row. The challenge was to not carry unused yarn too far, because it wouldn't do to have a fabric three and half inches thick with yarn , in that front panel.

So it was a slow and painstaking process to plan out where to pick up yarn from (previous rows, new strand,...) and where and when to drop it. Ah yes, and then the weaving in of ends.

I recall I enjoyed the challenge and it certainly met my need for a knitting fix. But I have no desire to make another Van Gogh Image in Intarsia. I heard the client was thrilled with the result. I have to say it was stunning.

But I was stunned. Maybe.
Arctic-mermaid
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PattiG
Permanent Resident

1119 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  3:23:42 PM  Show Profile Send PattiG a Private Message
I've never mastered the kitchener stitch, and my intarsia stinks. My seaming leaves a lot to be desired. I'm glad knitting is a forgiving craft. And there are so many techniques I haven't even tried yet!

PattiG
Atlanta
http://redvelvetcake.typepad.com
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sucka4yarn
New Pal

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  8:17:41 PM  Show Profile Send sucka4yarn a Private Message
Toughest technique? Hmmmmm.... I suppose I have to cast my vote for doing those first couple rows on DPNs. Not necessarily brain-tough, but it gets my fingers scrambling to this day!

An optimist feels we live in the best of times...a pessimist fears this is true.
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t-bone barbie
New Pal

27 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  9:56:48 PM  Show Profile Send t-bone barbie a Private Message
double knitting. i would say intarsia, but since i haven't really done ANYTHING (even a swatch) correctly, I don't think it counts. but back to double knitting, it was fine when I did a double sided fabric. but then I got cocky, and tried to do two socks at the same time by double knitting. . . it worked for about an inch I think next time I'll join them after the ribbing is finished.

"The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits."
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Jusknittin
New Pal

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2004 :  04:08:04 AM  Show Profile Send Jusknittin a Private Message
I have conquered entrelac!! I have become addicted! I have made two bags and felted them and am going to make the entrelac jacket in the Noro book in Kureyon as my after summer project. Too much wool in my lap for this time of year!!!
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happyneedles
Seriously Hooked

USA
849 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2004 :  04:34:42 AM  Show Profile Send happyneedles a Private Message
I love that entrelac jacket. It's a beauty! As for myself short rows had me going when I was doing Teva Durham's sideways coat. Once I got the hang of it it was great fun. The hard part is getting there of course. A year ago I conquered continental knitting so now I'm able to do two-handed fair isle. I've never attempted socks, I'm sure those dpns are unweildy! And I have to credit my lys for teaching me everything I know! Sue

~Knitting is a gift you give to yourself~
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bealynn1949@yahoo.com


Posts

Posted - 06/26/2004 :  05:15:10 AM  Show Profile Send bealynn1949@yahoo.com a Private Message
It may sound strange, but the most difficult technique was probably learning to knit in the first place. Yarn, two needles, and ten thumbs! I learned to knit in my early 30's and absolutely love it. I have come a long way in the last 20 some years. I love knitting with multiple colors and taught myself how as well as have taken some classes. I also hate to purl. I read someplace (can't remember where or I would definitely give the credit)that all knitting is just the knit stitch and a purl stitch is just a backwards knit stitch, so I taught myself to knit back bacwards by turning the work in mid-stitch to see what it looked like going the other way. Now I either knit it round or knit back backwards and never turn anything. Happy knitting, all! B
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