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newpilar
Chatty Knitter

USA
196 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2004 :  05:20:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit newpilar's Homepage Send newpilar a Private Message
I went yesterday to B&N looking for a book to learn how to Felt( I will hopefully start soon). But here's my issue in NY most of us are apartment dwellers and we don't have washers and dryers. Therefore we go to a laundromat. So if you wanted to Felt how do you do it. I found a book in B&N but it says you can't felt bags or slippers by hand , so there goes the fun!!!, because that is what I want to try. Is their a website that could help!!!

Carmen in the learning

VaxGirl
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
511 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2004 :  07:27:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit VaxGirl's Homepage Send VaxGirl a Private Message
Here's an article on it. http://www.fuzzygalore.biz/articles/fulling.shtml

"SmellyCat, SmellyCat, what are they feeding you?"
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pttalbott@juno.com


Posts

Posted - 09/13/2004 :  07:34:13 AM  Show Profile Send pttalbott@juno.com a Private Message
I'm also an apartment dweller, but have easy access to a machine in the building but with no control over the cycles. Thanks for the site!
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Savitar
Chatty Knitter

311 Posts

Posted - 09/15/2004 :  1:21:15 PM  Show Profile Send Savitar a Private Message
I've felted four bags by hand, as I have a front loader that locks itself during the cycles. One was the fairly large French Market bag. They turned out fine. Takes about 45-60 minutes for me, though, so you have to be prepared to do a lot of swishing. I shock the items with cold water every now & then, too.
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Allyn
Chatty Knitter

USA
290 Posts

Posted - 09/15/2004 :  6:00:48 PM  Show Profile Send Allyn a Private Message
Just goes to show you can't believe everything you read. Felting is a whole lot older than washing machines and if you have to have a machine to felt, why am I always in such a panic when I hand wash fleece?

Allyn

Ik hald fan dei.
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food.writer@earthlink.net


Posts

Posted - 09/16/2004 :  10:05:11 AM  Show Profile Send food.writer@earthlink.net a Private Message
I supplement my machine felting with hand felting--fill the sink with only an inch or two of hottest water, then put on rubber gloves and swish/knead the bag.

My advice: Watch how vigorously you knead. I've developed friction blisters on my pinky knuckles, where they hit the bottom of the sink. (But if I fill the sink too full, I splash all over...)
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artsyfish


Posts

Posted - 09/16/2004 :  11:16:03 AM  Show Profile Send artsyfish a Private Message
I have a front loader too, and am making the felted clogs. It doesn't always lock, so I was going to try it, but now that I've read about the board and the plunger I'll just use the hand felting method. The Mongols DIDN'T carry their top loaders around on their horses!
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RoseByAny
Permanent Resident

USA
12598 Posts

Posted - 09/16/2004 :  11:20:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit RoseByAny's Homepage Send RoseByAny a Private Message
Allyn, that's exactly right!

All these things we're doing have been around for centuries/millenia longer than any of us... we're just renaming it!

Besides, everyone knows the Mongols used front loaders.

"Choose your friends by their character and your socks by their color. Choosing your socks by their character makes no sense, and choosing your friends by their color is unthinkable."
http://RoseByAny.BlogSpot.Com
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Denise
Warming Up

70 Posts

Posted - 09/16/2004 :  11:21:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit Denise's Homepage Send Denise a Private Message
Great info, thanks! I have a front loading washer and although I have felted things in it, they didn't get as felted as I wanted them. I am going to try it with a plunger (although I may pick up a new one to use)
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Roberta


Posts

Posted - 09/16/2004 :  1:03:13 PM  Show Profile Send Roberta a Private Message
Although I just got a washing machine (hooray!...as a kid I was always puzzled as to why this was such a desirable prize on game shows.) NOW I understand. Anyway, I have been felting for about 4 years, and until now I did everything in my kitchen sink. It takes patience and some muscle but it works fine. I even did a whole felted coat in my sink. (don't try this at home ).

Don't put too much water in the sink or you will splash it everywhere. Use the hottest tap water add detergent and start kneading. The process seems to go faster if I also have a sink/large pot full of very cold water and switch off between the two. I have also discovered that those textured bath gloves which you can easily get in any drug store are a great help. It protects your hands-somewhat, and it adds greatly to the "roughng up" of your felted object.

Also keep in mind what yarn you use when felting. Some wools felt much faster than others. Lopi and Lambs Pride are very good felters. This might be important if you plan to do lots of hand felting. FYI: Noro Kuyeron thakes FOREVER--but its very pretty when your done.
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mhyarn
New Pal

USA
15 Posts

Posted - 09/16/2004 :  2:28:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit mhyarn's Homepage Send mhyarn a Private Message
The bowl of cold water to alternate is a good suggestion, I often use the microwave and heat it up for about a minute then drop into ice water in the sink. A way to save hands, after you have kneaded and rubbed in the soapy hot water, wring out most of the water and bang it (or drop hard) onto the sink bottom or kitchen cabinet top.

For those who use the washing machine, it helps to put a pair of jeans in with the item to help with the agitation.

Barb from Marr Haven Wool Farm
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rsionakides@core.com


Posts

Posted - 09/16/2004 :  2:38:05 PM  Show Profile Send rsionakides@core.com a Private Message
When I visited Greece last summer I went to my favorite museum in Thessaloniki, the Ethnographico, where an impressive exhibit of water power was mounted. This exhibit showed how the Greeks used the water flowing in their streams that turned wheels and gears to perform many tedious tasks with much ease. One of the tasks was felting both woven and knitted fabrics. (Those fez hats were actually knitted and felted.) The water wheel activated a series of wooden mallets that beat the fabric. If you are getting tired hands or fingers rubbed raw you could try gently beating the fabric with a wooden mallet while turning it. The water in the streams was not hot but very cold. The main thing needed for felting is pressure through beating. That's what the towel or jeans is doing in the washer. Hot/cold water makes the felting go faster since it does shock the wool fibers.
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wollekje


Posts

Posted - 09/17/2004 :  08:30:51 AM  Show Profile Send wollekje a Private Message
hi all, i have felted by hand and hated the hard work, until i read this brilliant advice: use a plunger! (buy a new one and designate it for felting to keep things clean (-: ) no more putting your hands in boiling water, and it is quicker as well!
annemarie
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knitlethab
Seriously Hooked

Canada
604 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2004 :  10:43:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit knitlethab's Homepage Send knitlethab a Private Message
If you have all forgotten; use a scrub board as well. Many are still available from hardware stores. Or maybe antiques shops if you want the challenge. With a little soap thrown on the rough edge and a bit of scrubbing it felts quite nicely. Also you can tuck the scrub board away in you closet when it is not in use.

Sharon

www.knittingtime.com
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truly violet
Permanent Resident

6398 Posts

Posted - 09/23/2004 :  3:00:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit truly violet's Homepage Send truly violet a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by RoseByAny

Besides, everyone knows the Mongols used front loaders.



ok this one cracked me up big time
hahahaha
I just had a whole dream about tibetian refuges and the mongols on the steps of Russia
( I have really weird dreams I think)

vi

none of this will matter in 100 years.......except I will finally be at my goal weight...vi
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agnesgooch
Gabber Extraordinaire

573 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2004 :  04:37:45 AM  Show Profile Send agnesgooch a Private Message
This is great information. I live in an apartment, also, and have been wanting to felt some things. I'm off to the hardware store to buy a plunger and a washtub.
Cathy
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mwyn
Permanent Resident

USA
1419 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2004 :  07:06:41 AM  Show Profile Send mwyn a Private Message
I have to say that as far as knitting accessories goes; the plunger & washboard are now at the top of my list! (Of the most bizare.) (But necessary.) Huweeeee. I can just see myself asking if I can get that plunger in blue, to match my other knitting accessories, don't cha know. mwyn

One who works with his hands is a laborer. With hands & head; a craftsman. With hands, head & heart an artist. (Paraphrase St. Francis of Assissi)
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ursonate
New Pal

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2005 :  1:12:31 PM  Show Profile  Visit ursonate's Homepage Send ursonate a Private Message
I was at a talk where a device called a rapid washer was mentioned. The speaker uses it when she is travelling and she totally recommended it for folks without washers. In fact it was designed for poor people who didn't have washers. Here is an example: http://www.wisementrading.com/washing.htm I'm sure google will provide you with more.
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clover
Chatty Knitter

USA
147 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  12:30:46 PM  Show Profile Send clover a Private Message
I agree about finding a washboard. I used a plastic ice cube tray and it worked just fine. But now I do want to find an old fashioned washboard just 'cause they're cute. But it's going to have to be cheap!

Am I the only person who thinks that it is better and faster to carry on with hot water and soap instead of 'shocking' the item with cold water? I agree it does tend to give you some quick, tangible results but I wonder if it just interferes with the process and (more importantly!) makes the felted item stiffer and scratchier in the end. I have no basis for this, just a private theory...

i love knitter's review!
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lizknits
Chatty Knitter

110 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2005 :  10:08:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit lizknits's Homepage Send lizknits a Private Message
I've checked on ebay for a washboard and most of them are under 10 dollars which I think is a pretty good deal. I'm only just now working on my first felted project which I did in my washing maching, but I am interested in learning to do it by hand as well.

http://runningstitch.blogspot.com/
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