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 No-kill Silk Yarn?
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 10/01/2004 :  07:13:34 AM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
I have made two shawls with soy silk and they are lovely. I cannot reply about the warmth however as both of these were made with ribbon that was about 1/3 of an inch wide on very large needles and have large openings (holes) in them. I suspect they would be very warm if knit more tightly.

fran
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carpe diem
Permanent Resident

1158 Posts

Posted - 10/01/2004 :  10:08:54 AM  Show Profile Send carpe diem a Private Message
Isn't silk the strongest natural fiber? Is soy silk comparable in strength?

~ Lisa, Seattle
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 10/01/2004 :  3:14:30 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
yes
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achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 10/01/2004 :  6:10:20 PM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by RoseByAny

I leave the bugs alone as much as possible. I kill the fleas that are on my pets.

The distinction is easy - if it's not bothering anyone, it lives. If it hurts the ones I love (and if you saw my bald-butted kitty this summer, you'd have no doubt he was hurting) it finds a life on another celestial level. It's a protection issue - sort of like self-defense.

I don't want to kill an animal for luxury. Silk is nice, but not a neccessity. Yes, it's "just a worm/caterpillar" but IMHO, having "dominion over the earth" doesn't give us the right to cause it unneccessary pain or take advantage of it negatively. If we can reap the same benefits without hurting another being, we should do so. If we can't, we need to decide if the product is worth the loss of that being. It's a karmic thing for me....

(and no offense taken by your question - it was very valid)

"Choose your friends by their character and your socks by their color. Choosing your socks by their character makes no sense, and choosing your friends by their color is unthinkable."
http://RoseByAny.BlogSpot.Com



Thanks, Rose!

Anita

See my completed projects!
http://www.picturetrail.com/achrisvet
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Chayah
Permanent Resident

1927 Posts

Posted - 10/02/2004 :  6:47:12 PM  Show Profile Send Chayah a Private Message
I read some of the information on soysilk and other fibers , it was fascinating.Has anyone tried yarn made from bamboo, corn or milk? I hope to try the soysilk soon. Chayah
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media.teatime@gmail.com


USA
Posts

Posted - 10/02/2004 :  8:53:34 PM  Show Profile Send media.teatime@gmail.com a Private Message
I am always amazed at the diverse group of people who practice this craft. It never crossed my mind to wonder about the production of silk. And not only are there people who wonder; even better, there are knitters who know the answers! I've just spent a happy hour (or possibly more...) reading up on silk on the Internet, and placing holds on all the mystery books recommended in another forum. Tomorrow I'm gonna go find some soy silk!
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Mercedes
New Pal

3 Posts

Posted - 10/03/2004 :  07:27:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mercedes's Homepage Send Mercedes a Private Message
Standard Tussah silk does involve killing the worms for the fibers, the same as Bombyx. While you may be able to process the fibers after the worms have emerged from their cocoons, that would just make it rawtussah silk. Tussah is just a descriptor of the way the worms were fed, not an indicator of how the silk is processed. Unfortunately, the information on Aurora's site http://www.aurorasilk.com/shop/tussah_fiber.shtml
is an inaccurate description of tussah silk. You cannot get smooth, shiny silk without boiling the cocoons intact. You can process them after the worms emerge, but you get a completely dfferent kind of fiber.
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Mercedes
New Pal

3 Posts

Posted - 10/03/2004 :  07:53:49 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mercedes's Homepage Send Mercedes a Private Message
I realized my comment about Aurora may have come on a little strong. I just think they may need to make it clearer to the consumer (many of whom may be unfamiliar with the details of each and every fiber and rely on website info to make an informed decision) the destinction between their tussah peace silk fibers and standard tussah silk fiber available on the market through most other sources. Their definition of tussah makes it sound as if that word automatically denotes a no-kill fiber, which would not describe most other tussah fibers out there on the market. These two silks would be quite different from each other, and folks would need a better idea of that difference than the info the Aurora website provides.
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 10/03/2004 :  09:09:04 AM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
I don't think the manufacturer wants to make it easier for the consumer to make a decision based on no-kill. They are interested in definitions which make their products sound good and beautiful. If the consumer wants to use other means to make their decisions then it is up to the consumer to become informed. Not everything in life is handed to us and we shouldn't trust just one definition if we are interested in the truth.

fran
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Mercedes
New Pal

3 Posts

Posted - 10/03/2004 :  3:27:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mercedes's Homepage Send Mercedes a Private Message
Very true. I do think any informed consumer should do their own research, no matter what the product is; but I do also get a bit peeved when things appear to be misrepresented or inaccurately described. Let the buyer beware.
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KnittyKitty
New Pal

41 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2004 :  2:27:56 PM  Show Profile Send KnittyKitty a Private Message
hey! i started a thread a while ago about vegans, it may be what was referred to as "controversy". i wouldn't say there was an argument, people just expressed their strong yet different opinions. (seems to be too old to show up in a search. i may have started it under "k8et")

i am vegetarian, and have vegan friends. it's a tough issue to talk about, but usually you leave the conversation learning something or teaching something! (most of my friends may try to educate but try not to "preach" or "convert"!)

regarding silk, you may want to look into the recylced silk yarns (mango moon is one) - they cut up silk saris and make yarn. it's not nearly the same as regular silk yarn but beautiiful in its own way! i believe the proceeds benefit women in nepal....

in some research on wools, i found some ethical companies to include green mt spinnery, peace fleece, and morehouse merino. (i don't have detailed info on where i got that from, or how extensive they are about keeping the process animal friendly, but i remember talking to green mt on email.)

i'm not going to stop using wool anytime soon, but i am trying to find more reputable and ethical suppliers.

if you are interested in more info, check out
http://www.vegsource.com/jo/qa/qasilk.htm
http://www.vegsource.com/jo/qa/qawool.htm

this author tends to be practical with advice rather than shoving extreme examples of cruelty in your face. the bottom line is that the facts you get from the extremists on both sides have some truths but some errors. there are almost always ways to ensure the product you get is from a small ethically conscious company rather than one that causes more harm just for the profit.
of course the vegans will tell you it's better/easier to avoid it all together... ;o)

as much as it sounds like an ideal to have everyone be vegan, it ain't gonna happen. it's important to learn about how "voting with your dollar" makes in impact, and to educate yourself on the impacts of commercialism. but the bottom line is you do what you can to make the world a better place. a few years from now you may be able to do more. (i'll give up wool and silk when i give up cheese. not anytime soon!)

(i'm happy to talk more about it off board if anyone feels the need to learn more! sorry for being so longwinded. thanks to everyone who posted already for being aware, openminded, and kind about the discussion!!)

katie




http://knittykitty.blogs.com

(formerly k8et)
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rebeccaL
Seriously Hooked

721 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2004 :  06:15:44 AM  Show Profile Send rebeccaL a Private Message
quote:
Tussah is just a descriptor of the way the worms were fed, not an indicator of how the silk is processed.


Actually, Tussah are a different kind of moth than the "traditional" silkworm. They are much larger and look more like Luna moths. The caterpillars are green instead of white.

This has been a fun thread.

Rebecca

-------------------------------
Visit my blog at
http://www.spacesheep.com/Fiber/knitblog.html
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lella
Permanent Resident

9714 Posts

Posted - 10/08/2004 :  6:00:24 PM  Show Profile Send lella a Private Message
I love this thread! My DD's will love it too, being very very zen vegan and so gentle they won't even kill moths that are threatening their wool stash.

Sheesh. I might even consider killing DH if he was threatening my wool stash! Just joking.

http://zippiknits.blogspot.com/
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