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 Do You Have Confidence in Your Knitting Knowledge?
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Dagny
Chatty Knitter

USA
178 Posts

Posted - 10/27/2004 :  05:21:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit Dagny's Homepage Send Dagny a Private Message
As I confident that my knitting makes me happy, keeps my friends and children warm, and makes people smile... other's opions never really matter that much to me when my 5 year old takes a hat off his head and gives it to a homeless man at a shelter we were bringing food to, telling him "my mom's 'kitting' will keep you warm"

(sorry, gloating mama moments there!)

GO RED SOX!!!

Dagny in Maine

<a href="http://www.tihea.com/yarn">yarn blog</a>
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luv2knit944
Permanent Resident

USA
1789 Posts

Posted - 10/27/2004 :  06:08:34 AM  Show Profile Send luv2knit944 a Private Message
Yes,most of the time I do have confidence in what I'm doing.I knit so many things.The patterns are sometimes a mess,so I do change or question them.The Lys owner,employees & me help each other sometimes.They come to me with tey,re questions,would you believe?I even showed a few things how I do it to the owner.It's when the pattern doesn'make any sense that I get uptight.But I run to the owner & we figure it out together.Or forget about that particular pattern & go to something else,which it's not very often.Maybe once or twice the most.

Pauline
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KysKnitnMom
Permanent Resident

1050 Posts

Posted - 10/27/2004 :  10:35:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit KysKnitnMom's Homepage Send KysKnitnMom a Private Message
I am not confident enough to help someone. I am usually trying to figure it out myself. Reading knitting patterns and what not do not come easily to me. I do struggle and get frustrated but eventually get it worked out. I wouldn't go in my LYS to ask for help...they just had a sing on their door saying they needed part time help and knitting experience was not necessary. Scary!!! Thankfully I have a friend that is a fabulous knitter who helps me when I get stuck.

Megann, in sunny San Diego.


A turtle doesn't get anywhere without sticking her neck out.
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pzee
New Pal

USA
25 Posts

Posted - 10/27/2004 :  11:03:59 AM  Show Profile Send pzee a Private Message
I have always been confident in my knitting, but let me tell you. I am beginning Level III, the final level, of the Master Handknitting Program through TKGA. This is a fabulous program. Very intense and detailed. I had one swatch I had to redo because there was one twisted stitch in the entire swatch. You wouldn't believe how long it took me to find the stitch they were talking about. For anyone with little or no confidence, this is a great program. You proceed at your own pace. Level I came very easy to me. Level II, they were much more critical of. It's a great way, though, to improve your skills and to learn so much about knitting techniques.
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 10/27/2004 :  11:09:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
quote:


From what I am reading here, we are a tribe of daring, inquisitive, and creative knitters -- and I'm proud to be in our company!

Jane

My album: http://jane.c.home.mindspring.com/



Hmmmm, could it be that the brave innovative people here are self-selecting by being the ones to brave the registration, posting and other gauntlets of the internet?

Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
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purlewe
Permanent Resident

1916 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  07:29:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit purlewe's Homepage Send purlewe a Private Message
I am coming up on my 2nd yr of knitting, but I find that confidence in your knitting just means confidence in what you can do. When I started knitting I wasn't excatly thinking I would be making sweaters.. or anything else for that matter. I started knitting b'c my aunt said she wanted to get sheep and I was trying to sort out my life from a terrible muddle.

And I am one of those people who needs to start on an intermediate project... if I don't I get very very bored. By the second project I was blissfully knitting away and planning sweaters, vests and other things in my head. I happened upon my fave LYS when I went for materials and asked her a question. She gave me her suggestions (notice the word suggestions) and then told me to sit down and figure out what I wanted by knitting a swatch of any of her suggestions. WOW. It made me realize that *I* make the decisions and can decide however I chose. I do ask her sometimes now things that are on my mind when I see her or her staff.. but they understand that they are giving their opinion and that it isn't necessarily the only way to go. I knit so many different kinds of things, and I drop by and show them in their various stages of completion. They always say such nice and complimentary things, but they never say things like "I would never do that" even if they don't think that is what they would do. They simply say, "What a great idea!" I don't rely on my LYS to lead me where I want to go, and I don't expect them to only lift my spirits.. but I expect a good LYS to be able to realize when they can suggest things and when they can leave me to my own devices. I am a confident knitter. And I know that if I cannot figure out how to do it on my own I have the resources available to me to be able to figure it out eventually.

Bad officials are elected by good people who don't vote.

http://www.livejournal.com/users/purlewe/
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anygren5@comcast.net
New Pal

5 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  10:27:04 AM  Show Profile Send anygren5@comcast.net a Private Message
I have been knitting for about 6 years, and I know a little bit about a lot of things---enough to keep me satisfied with the things I make. I really like learning new techniques and I think that's half the fun for me.
As far as my LYS goes, I have had a few problems with the staff. I feel like I am not taken seriously when I go in there, and I feel as if I am imposing if I have a question or need help. They always seem "very busy." Ah well, they have a good yarn selection--which is more important in the long run anyway.

aubree
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crgilvr
New Pal

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  10:27:35 AM  Show Profile Send crgilvr a Private Message
I've been knitting about three years and though my LYS store owner is very knowledgeable, she doesn't have the time to experiment or read a lot about new things. I introduced her to Sally Melville's suggestion about fulling "Touch Me" and she was thrilled.

I just got back my TKGA Level I and I only have to re-do two swatches, both blocking problems. Unfortunately I'm in the middle of moving right now so I'll have to dig out my stuff and re-do them after I'm settled in my new city (2000 miles away). Who knows where I packed my zonta wires!:) I plan on doing Level II at some point, but I have a lot of other things going on right now, moving, Christmas knitting, etc.

I am moving to a much larger place with 4 plus LYS and an active s&B and charity knitting community so I am looking forward to meeting new people (anyone in/near Louisville, KY?)

Crgilvr....

(buried in boxes)
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ebailey@entropymedia.com


Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  2:13:30 PM  Show Profile Send ebailey@entropymedia.com a Private Message
Interesting question. I've always been blessed with super LYSO's and fantastic friends. I don't feel I have "super" skills but do seem to be someone who is a "solve the problems/ answer questions" person. I believe that a really good LYSO sees valued customers as an asset and partners in helping each other.We have our limits & know when we are over our heads. At the same time,have strong skills in other areas.I'm really good at getting new knitters started & love teaching kids), so when that's needed, I'm able to help my more expert knitter friends. At the same time, there is always help available when I need it.

Betsey in Maine
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Mermaid Knits
Permanent Resident

USA
1129 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  2:43:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mermaid Knits's Homepage Send Mermaid Knits a Private Message
Unfortunately I don't have a local yarn shop. Not even close! But when I travel I often run into yarn shop staff or owners who are less experienced than I am. (I'm a Master Knitter and long time instructor). Throughout all aspects of my life I'm a confident person, so I would not hesitate to mention that there are some other ways to accomplish the technique or whatever is being discussed. Normally this leads to a friendly exchange of good ideas.

Cheers! Arctic-mermaid
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freecia
Chatty Knitter

195 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  3:14:48 PM  Show Profile Send freecia a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by HoJo

I am very confident in my knitting skills and am often the "go to" person for anyone (including the local knitting shop) for questions. Many of the local new knitters come to me for questions because the lys has a reputation of not being helpful or friendly.

It's not that I know weverything its that I'm not intimated to try almost anything and help figure it out. In fact, I love that challenge.

HoJo



HoJo is my "go to" at knit group meetings and I really like the outlook she has. I'm a beginner who helps friends get started and we all try to foster the "sure we can" spirit HoJo has. So my skills are meager but my confidence is high. I see patterns that I'm not up to working on yet but I've been known to grab some yarn, swatch, stare, mumble, rip, swatch, stare, and store it away for future reference. Of all the knitting tips HoJo has given me, "just try it out" is definitely the best.

The LYS attitude is "different" but perhaps they are more conservative because of customer expectations. The yarn listed in the pattern is the "safest" way to go when giving advice.
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labrahamsen@sbcglobal.net


Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  6:45:33 PM  Show Profile Send labrahamsen@sbcglobal.net a Private Message
Interesting question-we were just discussing it at the local pub where we knit on Thursdays. The group used to pay to knit at the LYS, so that they had a resource ready when they hit a problem. The LYSO raised her roundtable price, and they figured they could have good beer for the same amount of money and learn from each other. I wasn't in the original roundtable, but came with a friend who was. I think we decided eventually you graduate from needing immediate feedback and get to the point where you want to figure it out on your own.
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HoJo
Permanent Resident

USA
1474 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  10:14:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit HoJo's Homepage Send HoJo a Private Message
Freecia:

Thank you for the kind words and the tactful description of our lys. Hope to see you on Monday! I'll some more show and tell for you!

HoJo

"Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, only backwards and in high heels." Faith Whittesley
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SerMom
Permanent Resident

Canada
6412 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2004 :  11:16:33 PM  Show Profile Send SerMom a Private Message
I too am self-taught. I've read a lot of books, and a lot of threads here on the forums. It amazes me sometimes, the answeres I have to situations I've never even experienced because I remember that I read it somewhere. I'm not at all crafty, never been able to produce anything before I took up knitting just over a year ago. But I don't let anything intimidate me. After all, the worst that can happen is you have to start over.

When I do the knitting club at my kids' school, that's one of the first things I teach the kids - mistakes happen, they're no big deal. So, yes, I do have a lot of confidence in my ability. And confidence that I can get the answer. I've never actually asked my lyso for advice. When I need advice, I come here.

I do wish I knew more about yarn, though, but that will come with experience, I imagine. I'm sure that I've picked inappropriate yarns for projects (I never use the one in the pattern), and I'm pretty sure that I will again, but the world will not come to an end.

Barbara
Remember, we're self-selecting!

My photos: password: sermom
My blog:
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abcameo
New Pal

USA
26 Posts

Posted - 10/29/2004 :  09:25:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit abcameo's Homepage Send abcameo a Private Message
My basic philosophy:

There are no mistakes--only design elements.

Amy
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Shalee
Permanent Resident

USA
2042 Posts

Posted - 10/29/2004 :  10:10:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit Shalee's Homepage Send Shalee a Private Message
I am very confident in my knitting and realize that I can always improve in some area. No one is perfect, but I sure do try! I have read and read, swatched and swatched, and really enjoy every minute. I am confident when helping others with their problems, even if it is just to explain different options. That's what happens when you READ so much!

Thank you to all of you for your input here on the forum! Without your input I wouldn't be the knitter I am today!

Sharon in NW PA
I always wanted my own library but I didn't realize it would be all knitting books!
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Janice Alline
Seriously Hooked

USA
633 Posts

Posted - 10/29/2004 :  6:06:22 PM  Show Profile Send Janice Alline a Private Message
A couple of months ago I marked my 1st year as a re-knitter (as with Molly, I re-learned last year & it stuck this time). I am fairly confident of my skills & am mostly self-taught.

This summer I taught one of my co-workers to knit. I've never taught anyone to knit before. I kept telling her I was a newish knitter myself & didn't know if I could teach someone how to do something I just learned but she caught on & went on to do a couple of scarves & when she quit a month ago she had begun a felted purse pattern that I helped her select according to her skill level at that time. In fact, a few weeks before she quit, she taught her neice to knit.

Teaching someone else really lets you know that you know your stuff. I know I still have a lot to learn, even if it's just a variation on something I already know.

I learn so much from KR. I don't feel experienced enough to answer someones knitting question here as there are so many other more knowledgeable knitters .I'm glad there is such a wealth of knowledge here & you all are not shy about sharing it. Thank goodness.

The times I can get to my LYS the LYSO & employees are usually busy but the times I HAD to have some hands on help, they were very patient & not rushed in showing or explaining what I needed to know.

Jan in Lawrence, KS
" Why is it that when adults have multiple personalities it's schizophrenia, but when a child has imaginary friends it's cute?"
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luv2knit944
Permanent Resident

USA
1789 Posts

Posted - 10/30/2004 :  04:21:12 AM  Show Profile Send luv2knit944 a Private Message
I'm 100% With the confident knitters & everything they're saying.Also, I'm a perfectionist.So there's not to much that I can't do on my own. But there is always something we can learn from one another.

Pauline
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Bookworm
Chatty Knitter

USA
265 Posts

Posted - 10/30/2004 :  5:53:04 PM  Show Profile Send Bookworm a Private Message
I am much more confident now than I was this morning. Today was the Macon Knit-Out, so I gathered up a couple of WIPs and went. We all really had a nice time. Quite a few of the knitters there were fairly new, which I think is a good thing--we need more people to become interested in knitting to keep it going, especially in the South, where knitting does not seem to be as popular. There were some who came to learn to knit, and I was able to help a couple of them fix mistakes. This was new to me, as this was the first time in 16 years that I have knit with other people. One of the local TV stations showed up and interviewed the organizer, and the LYS which sponsored it got a lot of business from the people there, including me. I could not resist some Berroco Softwist. Another big boost to my confidence was that I won the "Fastest Knitter" contest. I truly did not expect to, since my preferred method is English, but I did! Of course, I am not nearly as fast as the world's record holder, but it was fun. Sorry about the very long(for me) post, but I am excited about all the exposure for my favorite way to spend time.
Hazel
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Atavistic
Permanent Resident

6604 Posts

Posted - 10/30/2004 :  6:35:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Atavistic's Homepage Send Atavistic a Private Message
I've been knitting for three years.

I taught a 10 year old ADHD kid to knit when I'd only been knitting for 1 year. I taught a friend to knit a few months later. I have no fear teaching others how to knit.

My first project was a sweater. A simple drop-shoulder sweater, yes, but a sweater.

I am mostly self-taught (a friend showed me the basics, but he knits left-handed and all of my stitches were twisted and so I forgot it all and taught myself from books months later) and have no fear.

I translated a sweater pattern from Norwegian (with a smidge of help from a board member!) and finished that with no problem (I also had to do all the math to change the gauge, account for shrink, etc). I am working on a project that's in vintage Swedish.

I taught myself tvåändsstickning (which neither of the employees at the LYS had ever heard of or seen) and have made several items using that technique.

I have designed my own sweaters and other items.

I don't even bother with one of my LYS employees. Today I picked up a new ball of merino wool in a lovely eggplant color and said, "Wow, this is great." She said, very slowly, "That's merino wool. Merino is the highest quality wool."

I looked at her, raised an eyebrow and said, "Most of my wool stash is merino. This is a great color." Where has she been? I only ever shop there and I buy non-novelty yarns only. Yes, I know what merino is.

I have no fear when it comes to knitting. It's yarn. It's knitting. It's not nuclear weaponry or surgery. What's the big deal?

Plus, Milinda says I'm an amazing knitter, so I know I must be. Hee hee.

Amanda

“There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches." Ray Bradbury
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