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TracyKnits
Chatty Knitter

324 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  3:54:22 PM  Show Profile Send TracyKnits a Private Message
My therapist is a knitter herself and we begin each session with my showing her what I've been working on. The last time I saw her we spent the first 20 minutes of the session discussing yarn.

Maybe I don't really need much therapy anymore - if the first thing I bring up is yarn!
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daviesrasb@aol.com


Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  3:57:47 PM  Show Profile Send daviesrasb@aol.com a Private Message
How about knitting during a church sermon? I think it would keep me awake and alert better, but also think it's probably inappropriate. Darn.
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artsyfish


Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  4:21:51 PM  Show Profile Send artsyfish a Private Message
Actually, I think knitting during a church sermon would be fine.

I was in a small all day class where I knit until the piece required some tracking. I did ask the instructor and she had no problem. I also participated more than most - maybe because I was alert!

I also knit anywhere I have to wait - doctor's offices, lines, etc. Why waste my time when I can do something enjoyable and relaxing?
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gcormode@earthlink.net


Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  4:48:14 PM  Show Profile Send gcormode@earthlink.net a Private Message
I don't think there are any hard and fast rules. Some presenters would mind, others wouldn't. Some meetings it would be fine, others it wouldn't. Some situations are too formal (church sermons and IBM business-suit meetings come to mind), others aren't.

If I do knit (or needlepoint, or rug hook) during a meeting, I make it a point to participate to show that I am "checked in".

I started bringing my handiwork to Sunday School class when I fidgeted too much. I'm always one of the first to volunteer for scripture reading and try to answer questions as often as possible. Everyone is used to it now and many of the ladies come by to see my progress at the end of class, but I got some looks in the beginning.
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nellcm
Chatty Knitter

161 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  5:01:35 PM  Show Profile Send nellcm a Private Message
i draw the line at knitting in church - only because i can imagine all the frowns i would receive, but i knit everywhere else. that's one of the benefits of knitting as far as i'm concerned...getting through those interminable meetings that drag on and on. i do not think it is rude and i figure it is someone else's problem if they don't like it.

whether i knit in class or not depends on the class. i didn't knit in college because i, too, was a copious note taker. but now if i'm in a class i might knit.

my knitting goes everywhere with me. period.
nell
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Mermaid Knits
Permanent Resident

USA
1129 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  5:05:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mermaid Knits's Homepage Send Mermaid Knits a Private Message
I didn't knit much yet at university so I can't address that specifically. I think the rule would be if you expected to participate actively, you shouldn't be doing crafts. If you are on a committee that is meeting, a planning session, budget work, etc. I'm pretty sure you will be in the thick of the dialogue and note taking and scribbling on the board or on the screen. Most meetings these days are pretty interactive and full of team work. Personally I think it would be distracting to others in that situation.
On the other hand, if you are in the back row of a huge presentation, where it is primarily a one way dialogue, I don't see a problem there. I've knit twice at work during an annual full day all-staff meeting. You have a hundred people or so crammed into a room. In my case I work on most of the committees that were reporting on their annual progress/update, so absolutely nothing was going to be new for me. So to not be totally bored out of my gourd, I brought simple scarf knitting and sat in the back and only the persons on either side of me noticed. But for me, yes, knitting really does help me to stay focussed and receptive. (It may help that I don't have to be looking at my knitting in order to do most stitches, so I can maintain eye contact).
On both occasions I asked some very good questions or added something to the Q & A portion and was even thanked for those contributions.
Arctic-mermaid
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knitdoc
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  5:14:35 PM  Show Profile Send knitdoc a Private Message
Once you are over fifty and have been knitting for over 45 years, it becomes less of an issue to get peoples permission to do things that you know are okay. People sit in class and meetings and read other material, file their nails, doodle, and worst of all, yak on cell phones. No one questions them. I say pull out your knitting and damn the torpedoes! My one caveat is that if you knit in public be good enough at it that making a mistake or dropping it in midstream won't be a problem. There is nothing you can't correct or repair or figure out where you left off. Knitdoc
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lacylaine
Seriously Hooked

USA
993 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  5:33:34 PM  Show Profile Send lacylaine a Private Message
As far as knitting in church goes, I know I've been tempted. But it's not what other people would say that stops me.

"Be still, and know that I am God. I will be exalted among the nations. I will be exalted in the earth."

Psalm 46:10

Every time I think about knitting in church, this verse stops me. I figure a direct command from the maker of the universe is something to pay attention to!

Melanie

"Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might." Ecclesiastes 9:10
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rgillman@studio78.net


Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  7:22:17 PM  Show Profile Send rgillman@studio78.net a Private Message
I say go ahead and knit -- especially in today's knitting revival climate. I knitted my way through college in the early '60's, as did almost everybody else (in all female colleges). The only time the professors minded was if somebody dropped an aluminum needle. CLANGGGGGG! So, if you are going to knit - use round needles, whether you are knitting in the round or not.
Rayna
www.studio78.net
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steesbassoon


Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  7:26:13 PM  Show Profile Send steesbassoon a Private Message
I carry my knitting bag many places with me, including sometimes to church, but am very careful about when and where I actually pull it out. During a church service would be a definite no-no (I'm married to a PK who would think it disrespectful), but after church, after perhaps the pot-luck luncheon, after all the luncheon stuff is cleaned up and no more volunteer help is needed...then I might knit if my kids are still involved in something or my husband is talking to someone. During a class, I don't think I could ever knit--I too take a lot of notes, and feel it's essential to remembering the lecture. Also I have read what many others have written about how knitting helps them concentrate and focus on whatever else is going on, but it doesn't work that way for me--while I'm knitting I'm listening peripherally to whatever else is going on, but I'm kind of in a zoned-out place where I'm enjoying the knitting and everything else is just sort of accompaniment. I often knit during the news and then realize I don't remember much of what I heard (and I have to look at my knitting most of the time, so I'm not seeing much of the news either!). I'm a pretty fast and fairly accomplished long-time knitter, and it's always worked like this for me. Does anyone else knit like this?
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DebiL
New Pal

5 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  7:39:08 PM  Show Profile Send DebiL a Private Message

I'm currently in grad school and knit during all my classes. I am usually knitting socks and my fellow students love to check out the WIP as the semester wears on. I'm not much of a note taker but I'm very interactive during the lectures and am able to demonstrate that I'm following along equally as well as any other student.

I never asked permission but I try to be unobtrusive.

My one professor questions my taste in sock yarns tho...just way too *loud* for her...my Lorna's Laces Daffodil almost gave her apoplexy, however she did covet the baby loop mohair poncho I was knitting
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knittingviren@sbcglobal.net


Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  7:55:02 PM  Show Profile Send knittingviren@sbcglobal.net a Private Message


several years ago i had this same discussion iwth folks on two of my needlepoint lists. the group was pretty well split.

however, i've decided to dang the torpedoes and full speed ahead. that being said, i now needlepoint (and as i've taken knitting back up, i will be knitting as well) while attending various seminars. the classes have been small -15 people or so, and large 100 or so. the reactions have been varied.
but as i sit and listen, and often put notes in the computer, while those around me fall asleep, snore, read, play games, etc., i find it amusing that people object.

i wish when i was younger i had had the courage to knit during class!!
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yarnspin
New Pal

18 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  7:55:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit yarnspin's Homepage Send yarnspin a Private Message
Wow! Hi everyone, and thanks for your responses. I did end up asking the teacher, and he was fine with it. I made sure to keep my knitting in my lap, somewhat under the table so as to avoid distracting other classmates. It's so nice to know that there are so many others out there who also find it helpful to be doing something with one's hands in class! Go knitters!!

http://www.yarnspin.blogspot.com
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marol_l@yahoo.com


Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  9:18:44 PM  Show Profile Send marol_l@yahoo.com a Private Message
I am ADHD, fully diagnosed, and through my school's Center for Students with Disabilities, I am able to knit, crochet, or do other hand crafts during class. Because these crafts are more or less automatic to a certain point, I am able to keep my hands busy and pay better attention in class. Some people were put out by it, but when I explained to them why I could do it, they were more understanding. It even became the new thing to do after some of my classes as other classmates asked me to teach them!
Marol LaPine
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kookenhaken


Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  9:31:12 PM  Show Profile Send kookenhaken a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by gcormode@earthlink.net

If I do knit (or needlepoint, or rug hook) during a meeting, I make it a point to participate to show that I am "checked in".

I think gcormode's advice is key - let people know it doesn't take all of your attention to knit. Often at the beginning of a class or meeting there is time allowed for everyone to introduce themselves and maybe say something about your interests, reasons for being there, etc. I try to take this opportunity to tell people that they will often see me knitting in class, but it doen't mean that I'm not paying attention. That, in fact, it actually helps me to focus better.

When I do knit in class, I choose smaller projects that I don't have to track too much. It's less distracting if my hands are mostly close to my body and not moving around to write and knit, back and forth. I also try to stay at the outskirts of the room, at the end of a row or the back of the room, to distract others less. People are distracted a little at first, but eventually they realize nothing new ever really happens while I knit and I fade into the background.

I worked at a Girl Scouts Council office for a while and during our biweekly meetings a box would be passed around which contained little toys - squishy, bendy, tactile toys. Anyone who wanted could take a toy and play with it quietly during the meetings. I think the idea of learning styles & multiple intelligences are being understood more widely. Sounds like most of us in this forum are kinesthetic/tactile learners - we need to get our hands moving to absorb incoming information better.
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sedgwick
Warming Up

87 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  10:06:55 PM  Show Profile Send sedgwick a Private Message
quote:
Once you are over fifty and have been knitting for over 45 years, it becomes less of an issue to get peoples permission to do things that you know are okay. People sit in class and meetings and read other material, file their nails, doodle, and worst of all, yak on cell phones. No one questions them. I say pull out your knitting and damn the torpedoes!


I'm with knitdoc on this one, except that I'm older and have been knitting for over 50 years. I don't ask permission for much anymore.

When it seems appropriate, I will tell the presenter that knitting helps me concentrate and participate more; otherwise, I just do it. Fortunately, all my meetings are on conference calls, so I just put on the headphones and knit away. At home I work on whatever I'm working on; in public I work on something that doesn't take much tracking, as kookenhaken calls it. I've taken to knitting afghans in blocks for this purpose--portable, simple, and small.

Rev Sedgwick
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PainterWoman
Chatty Knitter

USA
143 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2005 :  11:03:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit PainterWoman's Homepage Send PainterWoman a Private Message
I agree with KD: Easier to ask forgiveness than get permission. People just love to be restrictive, it seems to me. I've knit in church during annual meetings... (usually sitting off to the side and listening and participating), but I don't knit on sundays... (though I have been known to doodle! or make grocery lists if the sermon was deadly deadly dull... switched churches since then, actually!! :D) and at a very costly NLP seminar they also said that having multiple senses going on simultaneously increased the depth of learning. If people want to know about my knitting, I always say I'll be glad to talk to them AFTER the meeting/program.

http://Journal_to_a_muse.blogspot.com
The witty woman is a tragic figure in American life. Wit destroys eroticism and eroticism destroys wit, so women must choose between taking lovers and taking no prisoners. --Florence King
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knittybird
New Pal

29 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  02:36:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit knittybird's Homepage Send knittybird a Private Message
I'm actually more comfortable knitting in small classes. They tend to be more informal. For instance, I used to knit in my acting class. The professor got a real kick out of it and always smiled when he saw me knitting. Once, I was making a hat on dpns and he asked what I was knitting that needed a hole in it . When I don't have my knitting with me, he would ask where it was.
I think it is difficult for the lecturer to gauge how much you're paying attention in a larger class. In cases like that, I would only knit before class and put the project away when class starts and take notes instead. I usually get to class early anyway so I actually make some progress before class.

knittybird
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wolfhoundwoods@starpower.net


Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  04:41:15 AM  Show Profile Send wolfhoundwoods@starpower.net a Private Message
HI all - I take Italian class at night one evening a week with my husband and 2 others and I knit up a storm. I just started knitting one time and now always take it with me. It helps me relax and concentrate and i put it down whenever i need to write or read out loud etc. The teacher is kind of a friend at this point after 4 1/2 years of classes so it never occured to me to ask her at first - but I finally mentioned it a few weeks ago and she said she didn't mind at all. THe other students have no reaction other than that we sometimes have a brief discussion in Italian about what i am knitting and thus learn a few more words, like sweater, wool, mittens, knitting, etc etc etc.......
Way back in the '60s in high school I wanted to knit a scarf for an ersatz boyfriend and I asked my teacher in Chemistry class (I have no clue why it was that class) if I could knit if it didn't affect my work and he said to my surprise, YES. So I spent that fall knitting a scarf in chemistry and it is one of my nicest memories. I hated chemistry and it made it bearable. Too bad that teacher will never know how that little permission to knit made such a nice impression on me and made his class nicer for me. (He was quite elderly even then).
Frances
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bgcyclist
New Pal

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  05:12:43 AM  Show Profile Send bgcyclist a Private Message
I took my knitting once to an all-day computer seminar because I knew they were going to be talking about software I cared nothing about part of the time. A lot of people just left during the discussion so I don't think knitting was any more rude than that. My friends got a kick out of it.
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