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CynMcP@hotmail.com


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Posted - 01/07/2005 :  07:36:27 AM  Show Profile Send CynMcP@hotmail.com a Private Message
I knit most anywhere..People knit in my classes.. They don;t fall asleep..(I teach kniting ) I am 76..

Cynthia
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gmflans


Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  08:11:18 AM  Show Profile Send gmflans a Private Message
I've been knitting in meetings for so long that there are people who've never seen me without needles in hand! I find that if you work on a project easy enough to look up at the speaker and join in conversation, people will usually get the idea that you can knit AND pay attention.
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caretz
New Pal

3 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  09:33:52 AM  Show Profile Send caretz a Private Message
As a teacher, I always knit during faculty meetings. I did, ask permission of my administrators first, but as there had been other knitters before me, knitting at meetings was already acceptable practice. Most educators are aware that knitting or other simple handwork really does improve concentration. This fall I tested out this theory from the teacher's perspective. I had taught some of my 6th graders to knit (they made scarves for teddy bears to sell at a craft fair), and some asked if they could knit during my science classes. I said it would be OK for them to knit during classes that were not active (not all that many classes). They did, and these kids really were paying attention, based on their thoughtful questions and comments during these discussions. The side benefit from this practice was that more students asked to learn how to knit!
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levis_mama
Chatty Knitter

USA
188 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  09:40:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit levis_mama's Homepage Send levis_mama a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by pecorino


My therapist told me that it wasn't acceptable during our therapy sessions.... eventually I realized the knitting was better for me than she was.
~Amy



My pshrynk gets worried when I'm not knitting in session! He's smart enough to know that yarn's a little easier on the liver than xanax. (but not less addictive!)

I knit anywhere I can be unobtrusive about it - same as with nursing a baby. I took a class last spring and sat on the end of the second row and it didn't seem to phaze the other students or the rabbi one bit. It always helps me pay better attention and I retain more of the information. It's much less rude than playing games on a pda or cellphone.

I would think that knitting in church would be o.k. depending on your church, though that might be the best place for charity knitting or a prayer shawl. If anyone complains, just remind them about "idle hands" and let them know what the project is for. (I will admit, that while I want to, I don't knit durring in temple; DH would be appalled. He doesn't mind my knitting anywhere else, so I can respect this one limitation.

StephanieR
A priest, a rabbi, and a minister all walk into a stich-n-beach...
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ruthfully
New Pal

13 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  11:32:11 AM  Show Profile Send ruthfully a Private Message
I don't think it's a good idea to knit in a seminar sized class (25 people or less). Since I've been in university I've taken my knitting to a couple of big lectures without problems--but in small classes you're usually not only listening to others speak, but expected to actively participate yourself, which knitting might hinder (especially if, like myself, you're often referencing texts and need hands free to flip pages). So unless your class has a really tight bond and you and you classmates feel super comfy with it or your concentration is drastically improved by knitting (I'm thinking of a scenario where someone uses knitting as alternative medicine for a diagnosable attention disorder), I think the cons outweigh the possible pros.
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Tricotine17
New Pal

0 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  11:55:17 AM  Show Profile Send Tricotine17 a Private Message
When I taught, I was also on "Hall duty" and knit while patrolling the halls. My Grandma used to knit socks while going on walks in the country with us when I was little, that's how I learned that it was a natural thing to do. Couldn't knit and teach, but faculty meetings and inservice times were obvious times to knit. My theory is that it is less rude to knit than to fall asleep, which would have been a foreseeable behaviour after my six-class day. So, while looking absolutely enthralled by the speaker, there I sat, accomplishing something useful with my hands, never dropping a stitch, never being mad ad wasting my time and never feeling a pang of guilt! Knit when you can, life is short! Enjoy every stitch! Anna G.
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irishmomof9
Chatty Knitter

USA
142 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  12:55:11 PM  Show Profile Send irishmomof9 a Private Message
As long as you're quiet about it, and don't make a big show of the fact that you're knitting (which some MAY take the wrong way), I see no problem with knitting anywhere. I've taken it everywhere, and finished lots of projects in the off-time during meetings, etc. In fact the whole staff of night-shift RN's at Georgetown University Medical Center's NICU (where I worked when we lived in VA) used to knit, quilt, X-stitch, etc. Not only did it keep us awake, but somehow much more on-the-ball to the status of our tiny charges during those deadly 2AM to 4AM hours! I caught many a baby attempting to code, and was able to prevent a crisis, simply because, as Vicky noted earlier, knitting really helps your concentration. God bless, and keep on knitting!

...and may God hold you in the palm of His hand
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jen2500
New Pal

20 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  1:57:47 PM  Show Profile Send jen2500 a Private Message
I am a college-level teacher and frequently have about 25 people in my class each semester. I am a knitter so I appreciate why someone would want to knit in class. I have never had someone knit in my class, but I would find it distracting. I also think it would be distracting to my other students. Also, if the person didn't ask me whether it was alright to knit, I might think it a bit rude. I would probably tell my student no since my class is a participation class and not just lecture. However, if the class is purely lecture, I would say go ahead and ask the teacher. They may not mind.
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susanner
Gabber Extraordinaire

400 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  2:53:13 PM  Show Profile Send susanner a Private Message
Wow Jaw, seems like what you do on break is your own business. It seems to me that knitting is a lot less harmful than smoking.

susanne

quote:
Originally posted by jaw

From the teacher perspective I would say ask. I used to get really irritated when students doodled in class when I was trying to get information to them. Then I realized that I do the same thing and am able to concentrate better when my hands are busy. However, I was called on the carpet recently for knitting during breaks at an inservice. I made sure that when the presentation was going on I was taking notes, but when we had breaks I would pick up my knitting. It evidentially made one of the administrators unhappy and they did not have the courtesy to talk to me themselves, but delegated it to someone who wasn't even at that meeting.

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needleknit
Chatty Knitter

USA
134 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  5:00:24 PM  Show Profile Send needleknit a Private Message
This topic caught my attentiona and Marol, you beat me to it. I wanted to add that many people with ADHD (attention defecit)will focus better doing more than one task at a time. Seems hard for those who don't have it to comprehend, but it is the truth. I think if many of those people who are presently knitting in class were to stop-they would pick up a different habit to help them focus. Granted, most knitters aren't ADHD, but may need to keep their hands busy. So, if you're not knitting-would you be doodling?-chewing gum? twirling your hair?
I'm glad to hear you checked with your teacher-I think it is most polite to do that...sit in the back with quiet needles and if anyone is distracted by you show them what you are doing-maybe knitting would help them!! have fun
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patt711
New Pal

32 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  7:25:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit patt711's Homepage Send patt711 a Private Message
I have to add my 2 cents here. I'm a teacher and sit through long meetings, classes, and inservices. Now that I knit, I find I listen better and talk less--to the person sitting next to me! The presenters know I'm following them because I often make a comment or ask a question, and I don't think I'm distracting to anyone around me. Several of the staff members knit and ask to see what I'm doing before the meeting starts, but once we're underway, they aren't distracted by me.
I have to say what I do is certainly less rude than the staff (mostly men)who constantly have side conversations during the meetings.
As for asking, since the principal was new this year, I did mention to her that I like to knit during the meetings and that it helps me focus. She had no problem with it. I think at the end of this year, I'll knit her a scarf as a thank you for understanding.
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dragonmom
Seriously Hooked

USA
956 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  8:30:01 PM  Show Profile Send dragonmom a Private Message
as for knitting in therapy, for a while i was in group and individual therapy. neither therapist objected to my knitting. the group therapist asked that i ask permission of the group. i did so, and they said they were fine with it. later on, one man admitted he couldn't see how i could concentrate on both, until i made a very valid observation several times, whilst in the thickest of my knitting. i have 4 children, and 3 are adhd, so it wouldn't surprise me if i have some of the tendencies, also, because i do concentrate better when my hands are active.
Minnie

the world is knitted from one beautifully variegated skein and it's up to us not to drop a stitch.
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blufelicia@msn.com


Posts

Posted - 01/07/2005 :  11:57:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit blufelicia@msn.com's Homepage Send blufelicia@msn.com a Private Message
I've been on both sides of this issue. I've done corporate training, and it never bothered me when a student would knit or crochet. One gentleman made small wire sculptures while listening to me lecture-- and was attentive the entire time. There are some people who can't concentrate on what is going on in a lecture, when they see someone else doing a small activity. To me, that becomes a personal maturity issue-- if you can't concentrate on a meeting or lecture because you're too busy watching someone else knit and listen, then the problem is you! Depending on the subject matter and the teacher, I will ask if they care if I knit. I did attend a training session last month lead by some Denver PD officers, and there was no way I would ask them if they cared if I knit! I did have a small knit project in my bag- but I could tell from the start, these guys would have laughed me out of the room of 300 people!

At work, no one cares if I knit at my desk, as long as I am handling my customers in a timely manner. Again, depending on WHO is leading the meeting (senior corporate management, as opposed to my immediate managers) and the topics we need to discuss-- I will decide if I want to knit during the meeting. My concentration is best in the meetings where I knit or crochet-- in the other ones, I tend to write down everything-- not paying close attention to what is going on.
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englishtch
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
400 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2005 :  08:06:23 AM  Show Profile  Visit englishtch's Homepage Send englishtch a Private Message
I know from a personal experience how knitting can help an ADHD person. One of my students had a long history of problems in school, both discipline and academic. I got him knitting and talked his other teachers into letting him knit in class. His grades went up and his office referrals went down. No one seemed to have any problems with him knitting in class, either teachers or other students. Of course, in one week, he knitted a six foot long scarf just in class!! He and his stepdad also worked together on their crafts (stepdad did cross-stitch to keep his hands limber-he is a Marine in a bomb disposal squad).

Sadly, when he moved on to high school, they would not let him knit. He again had problems, ran away, and I have never been able to find out what happened to him.

I'm not saying knitting was a cure, but it sure did help this little guy, at least for a while.
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jaw
Seriously Hooked

USA
669 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2005 :  09:00:46 AM  Show Profile Send jaw a Private Message
Yes, Suzanner - I was most unhappy about that incident with the administrator. The thing that really made me unhappy was that at least two other teachers were called on the carpet for checking papers during a down time. What better to do than check papers? However, I did communicate with the superintendent and he told me "best to leave the knitting home". So I won't be taking it with me to work during down time, but will probably take a small project to work on during my lunch break. I am very happy however that just before Christmas break a fourth grade student at one of my elementary schools told me she had purchased a learn to knit kit from the Scholastic book club and would I help her with it. Of course I said yes. I also have a display in the library about knitting - took several of my children's books that relate to knitting and some projects.
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sgwdsf@hotmail.com


Posts

Posted - 01/08/2005 :  09:40:09 AM  Show Profile Send sgwdsf@hotmail.com a Private Message
I often knit in classes and meetings. I would stop or offer to move to another place (the back of the room?) if anyone asked me to do so. For the most part I have found that people understand knitting to be no different than doodling and certainly a better alternative than tapping fingers or feet or falling asleep (especially if snoring is involved!) I also have knit in church services and find that many others in my congregation do the same. A key seems to be using non-metal needles (noise) and having small projects that do not require a lot of attention. If people see that you are knitting but also looking at the slides/blackboard/lecturer and participating fully in the discussion they are more tolerant and understanding than if you are counting stitches, marking rows, and reading directions. Knit on!
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mafgreene
New Pal

USA
20 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2005 :  10:15:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit mafgreene's Homepage Send mafgreene a Private Message
knitting in meetings....well let's just say when i DON't knit in meetings, it makes it to the meeting notes- which are made public for everyone in the building, and then people ask if I have been not feeling well. I don;t think I ever asked, I just do it.
I work in theatre so we are a bit more flexible around here - If I am not knitting, I am sewing on snaps. And we have a LOT of meetings for couple dozen shows we do each year - so i do a lot of knitting, sometimes for costumes but mostly for me.
Now at our all staff meetings, there have been a few comments amd by the non-artistic staff but i just ignore it.
Somje of the high school girls who knit at my LYS say that they knit in class and their teachers do not seem to mind - except gym of course
so that was my 2 cents!

marietta in maryland
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littleturtlemama
Chatty Knitter

100 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2005 :  12:20:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit littleturtlemama's Homepage Send littleturtlemama a Private Message
When I was in college, I'd knit through all my classes, and the only profs who had problems with it were the female ones in my Women's Studies classes. They took a very disapproving attitude towards anything that might have been considered anti-feminist, or "June Cleaver" (this was prior to the recent stitch and beach revolution, LOL!) However, I always made a point to be actively engaged in discussions and always got high grades, so they really didn't have cause for complaint ;)

Theresa, knit-at-home mama to AJ, Ethan & Greg
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claudiam
Chatty Knitter

USA
144 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2005 :  9:21:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit claudiam's Homepage Send claudiam a Private Message
How about this I can pray during knitting, and I knit during choir practice but I think I would feel guilty about knitting in church because I should be focused on the message. I guess I also think its kind of rude, I guess God should get my whole attention sometime. So I think I tried to knit in church but I quickly put it away.

Do you think God minds me knitting during the service, where I could distract people who are trying to listen?

Claudiam
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Jenknitter
Chatty Knitter

164 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2005 :  3:18:52 PM  Show Profile Send Jenknitter a Private Message
I just was in a seminar yesterday, so I had been paying lots of attention to this thread, to see other peoples reactions. I took my knitting, with the possibility in the back of my mind of not being able to. However, when I walked in - I was pleased to see a lecture-type room. It ended up being packed and I don't think anyone even noticed me knitting. I couldn't believe the number of people chatting and answering thier phones during the seminar, though! How rude!!!

I knit in church, but no one can see me because of the ways our pews are set up - kinda in an arch formation. I only knit during the readings and the homily - I noticed the first time I did it that I payed MUCH better attention - which, of course, makes me keep bringing it back.

I was knitting in the doctor's waiting room last week. I do that a lot, but I have never had the nerve to do it in the room in the back. Every time it takes sooo long for the doctor to come in that I wish I had taken it out. This time I did take it out, and of course the doctor showed up in like 2 minutes.

http://jenknitter.blogspot.com
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