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 Is Embroidery the New Knitting?
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littlestwinnie
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  1:07:04 PM  Show Profile Send littlestwinnie a Private Message
Perhaps your MIL and friend got tired of patterns that come out odd or unwearable. Perhaps they just don't need to follow the herd.

I began knitting at age 8, embroidery at age 8, quilting at age 16, crochet at age 24, cross stitch at age 30. I did a bit of weaving at around age 35. I started serious hand quilting in the last year.

My knitting interest has had many revivals, usually based on improved yarn offerings, pattern offerings etc. I actually hate the fact that it's become trendy, although it has helped many young gals to learn it, who had no knitting mother to teach them.

In my British female lineage, knitting and gardening are just something that one does quietly and with pleasure and no need for a bunch of hoopla. Intimate mom/grandma/grandaughter chat about it is good enough.

I am glad that many very excellent designers have given us great design and pattern work. So much of the S & B is just trash, imo, but even there, some good design emerges. I personally think that knitting is too labor and spirit intensive to make trash good for a season only. OTOH, its healthier than smoking, I suppose, as nervous habits go...:D

"to err is human, to rip out, divine."
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littlestwinnie
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  1:09:48 PM  Show Profile Send littlestwinnie a Private Message
I don't know where that tagline came from, but I definitely don't think that ripping out is divine...!!?? Necessary sometimes but divine? Nah............:D

"to err is human, to rip out, divine."
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nara
Warming Up

55 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  1:25:16 PM  Show Profile Send nara a Private Message
Anyone want to take bets on when quilting makes its big come-back???
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freecia
Chatty Knitter

195 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  1:28:55 PM  Show Profile Send freecia a Private Message
Considering that I would rather knit an einstein coat out of 4-ply and #3 needles, I'd have to say nooo. Embroidery will not be my new hobby. Bad enough to even backstitch to seam stuff together.
On the other hand, some new knitters start out with eyelash for a funky scarf and get extremely frustrated. They might find something else more appealing after the first failed attempt. Of course, most first projects would make a cat laugh... Or perhaps more budget friendly?
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RachelKnitter
Permanent Resident

USA
2995 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  1:38:58 PM  Show Profile Send RachelKnitter a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by nara

Anyone want to take bets on when quilting makes its big come-back???



I thought it already had. Seems like for every new knitting book that gets published, there are 10 new quilting books.

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep; his cupidity may at some point be satiated: but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience." C.S. Lewis
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busygirl
Permanent Resident

New Zealand
1673 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  1:49:25 PM  Show Profile Send busygirl a Private Message

My maternal grandmother,who was British,did beautiful embroidery.I did a bit of embroidery years ago when I was a SAHM,but was not keen to keep it up, as I found it rather " fiddly".I have always enjoyed sewing;I did some patchwork a few years ago, but don't seem to find the time for it now,so I'll stick to my knitting!

Leslie
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HomeJewel
Chatty Knitter

321 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  1:49:37 PM  Show Profile Send HomeJewel a Private Message
I go back and forth between knitting and quilting/sewing. And then sometimes I get inspired to work on my scrapbooking. There are just not enough hours in the day!

http://homejewel.blogspot.com/
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qtpieknitter
Gabber Extraordinaire

Canada
583 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  1:51:08 PM  Show Profile Send qtpieknitter a Private Message
I thought quilting was back in, in a big way. Around here it is. I haven't seen much embroidery though. I guess it all depends on the marketing.
I don't follow fads, I do what I feel like at the time. I have been doing so many different crafts for so many years, I don't keep track anymore. I sew a lot less because of the kids (portability), and my cross-stitch and embroidery has been sitting there for years now.
I think it's easier to work on a certain project when it is popular, as there is more available, like now there will be a variety of embroidery kits out there.
I can't wait for my daughter to be a bit older (3 now) so I can show her stuff. She keeps saying that she wants to learn, so that's a good sign.
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Licensed2Cook
Permanent Resident

USA
3554 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  2:07:10 PM  Show Profile  Send Licensed2Cook a Yahoo! Message Send Licensed2Cook a Private Message
Yesterday my LYSO told me that she has just signed up for a quilting class and she has been doing needlepoint lately too in preparation for an upcoming industry convention. Her shop, has always carried needlepoint supplies.

I've considered trying it, I used to embroider details on much of my clothing as a teen and I have made many a counted cross stitch too over the years. There are times when I see a design that calls to me that I feel like getting out my stuff and going at it. The classroom where I teach knitting is the needlepoint room so I see these beautiful canvas' all the time and sometimes they whisper to me to give it a try. Perhaps I will some day. But of the two types of fine needlework that I have tried I like the embroidery over cross stitch.

Dee
~Licensed2Knit
www.Kneatles.com
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my3seadogs@yahoo.com


USA
Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  2:23:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit my3seadogs@yahoo.com's Homepage  Send my3seadogs@yahoo.com a Yahoo! Message Send my3seadogs@yahoo.com a Private Message
Oh, good! If embroidery and needlepoint are the "new knitting," then I already have a built-in stash to start (again) with!

Rachel's right about marketing. I've been doing one form of needlework or another since about the second grade, and it's been fun to watch crazes get manufactured, and then die away. Remember chicken scratch? Candlewicking?

It doesn't really matter in the long view. Those of us who truly love what we do will still be doing it long after the trend has shifted to some other thing.

--karen
http://saltysheepdog.blogspot.com

The Salty Sheepdog Baa & Grille
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JaniceV
Chatty Knitter

USA
338 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  2:41:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit JaniceV's Homepage  Send JaniceV a Yahoo! Message Send JaniceV a Private Message
Since I retired, and recently moved, I have had a chance to evaluate what I do have and what I needed to keep. I decided, living on a fixed income, I would narrow my creative urges into 2 areas. I will always stick with knitting and a little quilting. I have done needlepoint and counted cross stitch, but no more. I will stop and admire the work of others in those areas.

Janice
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Wovenflame
Seriously Hooked

Canada
812 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  4:29:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit Wovenflame's Homepage Send Wovenflame a Private Message
I learned to embroider at age 7, around the same time I began knitting. Since then I have learned and dabbled in nearly every other fiber art, including a few that are a little less know like tatting and hardanger. I always come back to knitting though. Knitting is the one thing that I can take with me nearly everywhere I go. With the right project I can even knit in the dark.

It's fun to combine a variety of handicrafts. Often the knowledge I gain in one area can be applied to another. For instance, I am considering decorating my current knitting project with a dimensional crochet flower of some sort and maybe a few simple embroidery stitches.

As far as a embroidery becoming the "new yoga", I don't know. I am not much of a trendy person. I've always done my own thing and paid very little attention to what is currently "it".

-Marlene-
Come visit me at: http://wovenflame.blogspot.com/

"First is to shift the perception. If you learn to look at something differently, you will change it in an instant. The point of perception from which you view any situation determines your entire reality." - The Group
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Stitching Fool
Chatty Knitter

196 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  6:11:05 PM  Show Profile Send Stitching Fool a Private Message
Wow! so needlepoint is going to be "cool". I picked that up a couple of years ago before my current "knitting phase" as my DH calls it. Talk about $$$ stash! All you need is a LNS, some friendly women there, the desire to create, and off you go!
When I discovered this needlepoint store, I used to think "where was needlepoint & knitting for me 10 years ago?" what a shame I could've been enjoying it, I forget that my kids (19 mos. apart) were babies (!!!) and my creative expression back then and into the present was/is cooking (talk about a FAD, CRAZE, MARKETER'S PARADISE--does anyone watch Food TV or go on Foodtv.com). I figured that was all the creativity I had time for and....we do have to EAT after all. I had loved sewing when I was much younger, but didn't have the time anymore once I finished college and started working. And being part-time working mom with small children very difficult, but I can still crank out a costume and curtains or pillows for the house now and then.
I agree with those that say its all about finding a creative outlet regardless of the current trend. Maybe we should be grateful that the marketers out there brought the hobby to our attention. I bought the SNB book and thought it was great that they offer a sewn project (knitting needle holder).We all know how enjoyable and rewarding it is to find that fulfilling hobby.(my favorite response to my needlearts interest, "Its my prozac")
enough rambling...thanks for reading if you haven't left this yet
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bloomoon1970@yahoo.com


Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  8:40:21 PM  Show Profile Send bloomoon1970@yahoo.com a Private Message
Though I'm an avid knitter, I'm also guilty of the other crafty pleasures out there, so I can understand the itch to try other things. Lately it's been soapmaking. I should also point out that five years ago I'd have told you that knitting "doesn't call me".
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clover
Chatty Knitter

USA
147 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  9:07:32 PM  Show Profile Send clover a Private Message
I love all kinds of crafts and needlework but love knitting the most because it is rhythmic and relaxing and proceeds a a pace that I can handle. With sewing, things can go so wrong so quickly! Also my eyes aren't what they used to be and I find it tiring to do close work under artificial light during our long winters. (most) Knitting is easier on the eyes than beading or hand sewing (which I love almost as much as knitting but almost never do except for putting up hems or sewing on buttons) or needlepoint. Also, knitting never ever requires me to clear off a table, or clean up afterwards or devote a whole room to a work in progress. Sure, my yarn is taking over my house but it doesn't have to...

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steff13
Chatty Knitter

USA
348 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  9:27:54 PM  Show Profile Send steff13 a Private Message
My mom taught my brother and I both to cross stitch when we were little. I have always enjoyed it, but it gives me a headache to count all those little squares. I know you can buy the projects with the pattern already on them, so you just stich over it, but that kind of feels like cheating to me. Like, we're all Michelangelo with a paint-by-numbers kit, you know?
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jelodi@earthlink.net
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 04/01/2005 :  06:30:50 AM  Show Profile Send jelodi@earthlink.net a Private Message
This topic struck me because when I started knitting I was actually in the craft shop looking form embroidery patterns. I learned how to embroider when I was 4 or 5 and was looking to take it up again. Well there was a dearth of embroidery patterns, supplies, and instructional booklets, so I learned how to knit. This was about 6 years ago and I have noticed recently that embroidery is starting to pop up again. I don't see why I can't do both!!
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maribelaprn
Permanent Resident

USA
2033 Posts

Posted - 04/01/2005 :  07:02:27 AM  Show Profile Send maribelaprn a Private Message
Needle crafts in all forms are "in"! Back in my youth (before the earth's crust cooled), I did lots of embroidery, including cross stitch samplers, needlepoint, and crewel work. Knitting became my passion when needlework patterns and kits became too, um, what's the word I'm looking for?? too easy?? too simple?? I came from the world of Eva Rosenstand, Clara Waever, Elsa Williams, and Erica Wilson; quite sophisticated, complex needlecraft! I then went into the knitting world of Penny Straker, also complex and sophisticated. What I found when I started knitting again this past fall were primarily very trendy, very youthful knitting. Sorry, but I'm not in need of another scarf, thanks! I want sophisticated!! Maybe it's a natural progression. Perhaps those who started knitting by making those great scarves and simple tops are too intimidated by more sophisticated patterns and are looking for other creative outlets, and embroidery is a natural progression. You can start out easy then progress into more challenging work if you want.

I hope that the surge in interest in all forms of needlecraft will offer all of us what we're looking for, whether that be trendy, quick to complete projects or complex, challenging projects. There's a market out there for all levels of needlecrafters and I'm glad to see it!

Mari

Don't confuse knowledge with wisdom. With one you make a living, with the other you make a life.
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Lanea
Permanent Resident

USA
5189 Posts

Posted - 04/01/2005 :  07:08:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit Lanea's Homepage Send Lanea a Private Message
For combined skills, I 'm a huge fan of crazy quilting. I've been fiddling with it for years and I find it really enjoyable. A crazy never feels done, but it always allows for such interesting work. And it uses lots of scraps, so the patchwork involved counts as cleaning in my book.

http://crazylaneas.blogspot.com/
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yarnfanatic
Seriously Hooked

826 Posts

Posted - 04/01/2005 :  10:09:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit yarnfanatic's Homepage Send yarnfanatic a Private Message
Since I was little, I have done crafts,candlemaing, ceramics, embroidery, sewing, dollmaking, designing my own teddybears, quilting,knitting,crocheting,crossstitching,everything! I have my parents and great grandmother to thank for allowing me to try it. but I always came back to crossstitching and knitting. I seem to spend one week knitting allot, then the next crossstitching allot. I find it to be a great balance. That is what my blog is about mainly crosstitching and knitting. I can't take my crosstitch w/me in the car, as I need a magnifier, but my knitting is portable, which Ilove to do in the car.
sherry
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