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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 07/10/2005 :  07:33:51 AM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
For several weeks now, I've been asking my family to pick up a thermal cup for me because I keep dropping all these sweaty glasses in this heat. They never remember. Yesterday, my daughter came home without it again and said: "sorry, Mom, I forgot again, I guess you'll just have to knit one."........SO I DID.

I started with my circular cast on and began knitting a circle. I measured it with a sports drink bottle as I went along and when it was almost as large as the bottom of the bottle I began knitting it straight up. When I got to the top of the bottle I made a row of eyelets using the crochetted eyelet technique, then ran a strand of yarn through them to tie it closed. When using it I tuck the ties underneath to keep them out of the way.

Crochetted eyelets: slip stitch into first knitted stitch, ch. 2 slip stitch into next knitted stitch, repeat to end, ending with ch 2 slip stitch into first slip stitch.

Knitted eyelets: k1, *slip stitch back to left needle, k1, slip stitch back to left needle, k2 tog* repeat between ** ending by knitting last chain together with first stitch.

Now here is the whole secret. I used some of that thin packing foam that came with a package I received and wrapped it around the bottle before I slipped my "bottle sweater" over it. You could also use some bubble wrap the same way. Years ago I kept wine bottles cool with aluminum foil and tube socks, so that would probably work too.

My drinks stay cool now for up to 5 hours. At least that is the longest time I have used it so far without refilling. My family keeps eying it and requesting one. I've told them that whoever buys me a thermal cup can have it.

fran

Lace Lunatic
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
524 Posts

Posted - 07/10/2005 :  09:50:54 AM  Show Profile Send Lace Lunatic a Private Message
Very ingenious, Fran! Thank you for sharing your inspiration with us. I'm already envisioning colored packing foam peeking through a lace version.

Suzanne
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Kimaroo
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
425 Posts

Posted - 07/10/2005 :  09:57:03 AM  Show Profile  Visit Kimaroo's Homepage Send Kimaroo a Private Message
I guess I'm weird but I thought this was the best part of the whole thing:

quote:
Originally posted by fmarrs
I've told them that whoever buys me a thermal cup can have it.



Hehee.

-Kim-

The Kimmish Knitting Blog
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Miss_Lizzyisaknitter
Chatty Knitter

USA
260 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  05:36:13 AM  Show Profile  Visit Miss_Lizzyisaknitter's Homepage  Send Miss_Lizzyisaknitter a Yahoo! Message Send Miss_Lizzyisaknitter a Private Message
cool idea, i thougt the last sentence was funny as well, lol.

Lizzy
~~Proud Knitter~~
mom to Jaemie & Christopher Jr
i'm a "chatty knitter" yay!
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klfrazier
Permanent Resident

1745 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  07:22:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit klfrazier's Homepage Send klfrazier a Private Message
Last fall I made a similar item in a class on traveling stitches. At the time, I was a bit annoyed because I don't like to spend time making what I term "household frippery." I was pleased that it fit over the 32 oz water container I use constantly, but would rather have spent teh time doing swatches that could go into my swatch/yarn book. (Call me nutty.)

Then I started to use it. Now it's a constant companion and I get more compliments on it than almost any of my other knits. It keeps my water cool, the container and everything around it dry and is more attractive that the water container.

Won't make any more, but glad I have this one!

Kristin

PS. We won't get into the issue of why people notice/are more impressed by a water jar cozy than by the complicated sweater my daughter is wearing or the intricate lace shawl on my arm....
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imamamaof2
Chatty Knitter

178 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  07:27:12 AM  Show Profile Send imamamaof2 a Private Message
What a great idea! A fun project for the summer!
I always enjoys your posts, Fran!
:o)
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rhys
Chatty Knitter

138 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  08:43:06 AM  Show Profile Send rhys a Private Message
Jeez, just think how long something could be kept cool if the cozy was felted.
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yarnlover
Permanent Resident

1748 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  10:14:38 AM  Show Profile Send yarnlover a Private Message
Felted bottle water holders do keep the drinks cool. I made one when I took a felting class years ago - it wasn't knit but made from wool batts. It was a really hot summer, and I was carrying around this water bottle and forgetting where I put it. Since it was a felting class and we could sort of go off on our own ideas by mid-week, I made a holder for my water bottle. I still have and use it, and this class was in 1993 or 1994. I keep it in the freezer and that helps to keep water cooler even longer. More than the cooling aspect, I like the fact that the wool absorbs the condensation. No more dripping from the bottle or those water rings everywhere. I've since made a few by knitting and felting.
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rhys
Chatty Knitter

138 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  10:36:06 AM  Show Profile Send rhys a Private Message
Yarnlover, do you still have an idea of the pattern you used? I don't know if I need one for a water bottle, but I do use a cozy for me Diet Dr Pepper can. Also, I wonder if a felted wine bottle carrier or holder would make a different kind of wedding gift.
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yarnlover
Permanent Resident

1748 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  3:33:45 PM  Show Profile Send yarnlover a Private Message
I don't exactly have a pattern - I sort of wing it, but in general this is what I do. Circular knit with circs or dpns. I cast on about 60 stitches on needle about size 10 or 10.5. I tend to grab whatever needle is empty in the general size I need, but you could probably even use an 11. Knit in the round for about 2-3" longer than the diet soda can. Then begin to decrease. If you have 60 st, then k8, k2tog around. You'll then have 54 st. K around, then decrease again by k7, k2tog. You'll be reduding by 6 st per dec round. Follow this routine til you are at about k3, k2tog or so, and then skip the k round. Keep going til you are at k2tog around, after that round, break the yarn, and run it through the loops 2 or 3 times before you pull snug. I usually break a fairly long piece of yarn and weave in any obvious holes. You can do an i-cord strap and attach to bag and felt it. The bottom of this bag will be curved in a bowl shape, but after felting it, hand-shape it so the bottom is flat. You can dry it right on a soda can to get the exact shape.

If you are not comfortable with winging it, do a swatch and measure the width/length of shrinkage and adjust your stitches accordingly. I don't do that, but instead I'll hand felt it to size or stretch it over something to size it. I've had some things not turn out, but not too often, so I don't swatch. For a diet soda can, you may need fewer than 60 stitches. I've made cozies for soda cans before, but not knitted, so I'm geussing on the number of stitches. I'd also suggest using a yarn that you've felted with before as you'll have an idea of how much it will felt. Hope this helps.
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Heather
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
456 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  7:47:52 PM  Show Profile Send Heather a Private Message
I'm unreasonably excited about this soda can thing. Perhaps I should make one in diet Mountain Dew colors. Then I would feel less sheepish about having the omnipresent can on my desk.

More than enough is more than enough.
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Heather
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
456 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2005 :  7:50:41 PM  Show Profile Send Heather a Private Message
Rhys, you must be Welsh, with your name spelled that way!

More than enough is more than enough.
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rhys
Chatty Knitter

138 Posts

Posted - 07/13/2005 :  06:44:23 AM  Show Profile Send rhys a Private Message
Yarnlover, thanks for the instructions. One more question (so far!). Is the cast on row the bottom or the top?
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knittiegirl
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
389 Posts

Posted - 07/13/2005 :  06:59:00 AM  Show Profile Send knittiegirl a Private Message
Fran,

Genius again! I love it!

Kristin

Fall down seven times, get up eight.
http://khrystyn.typepad.com/
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yarnlover
Permanent Resident

1748 Posts

Posted - 07/13/2005 :  10:55:07 AM  Show Profile Send yarnlover a Private Message
quote:
Is the cast on row the bottom or the top?


The cast on is the top. You can do it either way, but for me I find it faster to knit the tube then decrease the bottom to shape it. You could start by casting on a small number of stitches and increasing out for the bottom before knitting the sides. It can be done either way, depending on personal preference.

If you want to start at the bottom, do a search as I know there are posts with instructions for this technique, with tips on how to calculate increases. I don't have any numbers for you for this approach. Let us know how it turns out.
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rhys
Chatty Knitter

138 Posts

Posted - 07/13/2005 :  12:24:42 PM  Show Profile Send rhys a Private Message
Oh, good. I was so hoping you'd say that! When I first read it, I thought the decreases were following the shape of the can nearing the top, but then I thought, heck--where's the bottom? What a relief. Sounds like a good way to use up some scrap yarn. It would be cool to figure out a logo or initials to put in also. Thanks.
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SerMom
Permanent Resident

Canada
6412 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2005 :  7:09:18 PM  Show Profile Send SerMom a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by yarnlover

If you want to start at the bottom, do a search as I know there are posts with instructions for this technique, with tips on how to calculate increases. I don't have any numbers for you for this approach. Let us know how it turns out.

Increases for flat circle - 16st/4 rows, or 8st/2 rows. Instructions for Fran's circle cast-on here.

I think I'll make one of these for my water bottle, too. I hate how quickly it warms up!

Barbara
Remember, we're self-selecting!

My photos:
My blog:
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yarnlover
Permanent Resident

1748 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2005 :  7:41:54 PM  Show Profile Send yarnlover a Private Message
Thanks for posting that info - I knew I'd read it somewhere on KR but didn't take the time to look it up. I should try that cast on too. Though I like to learn new things, when I'm in a rush to make something, I used the tried and true methods that work for me.
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2005 :  11:16:02 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
As for a water bottle. You can fold the foam and slip it inside the knit sac and close up the top. Takes up very little room in your pocket or purse, and then pull it out when you need it. Question: Are water bottles more or less the same size? That sounds like a cute gift idea but since my water bottles are gallon jugs, I wonder what size to make. If I had my granddaughter bring me one, how many would I need to figure out sizing?

fran
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SerMom
Permanent Resident

Canada
6412 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2005 :  11:27:44 PM  Show Profile Send SerMom a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by fmarrs

Question: Are water bottles more or less the same size? That sounds like a cute gift idea but since my water bottles are gallon jugs, I wonder what size to make. If I had my granddaughter bring me one, how many would I need to figure out sizing?

fran

They tend to come in about 3 standard sizes, I think. I use empty gatorade/powerade bottles that I've washed out. They hold 710 ml.

One of them (and it reverses.periodically, and they don't make their tops interchangeable) has a really cool membrane type thing in the top which makes it perfect to put into a child's bed - it only dispenses when you suck on it, so it doesn't leak and you don't have to be awake enough to 'shut' it. But it's not a 'baby' bottle.

Barbara
Remember, we're self-selecting!

My photos:
My blog:
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 07/22/2005 :  11:36:08 AM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
Update.........finally, my daughter admitted that she didn't want to spend $10 on a thermal cup. My reply was: "I'm worth $10 and I'll spend it if I want to." So I marched over to the ebay site and bought thermal cups--12 16oz cups. And all I spent was $9. Now everyone in the family has one. But I got even---they are all orange. ROFL

fran
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