Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: Photos and wisdom from the Knitter's Review Retreat
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 Crochet Talk
 Crochet books, Web sites, magazines & resources
 TOTAL BEGINNER
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

SparkleyC
New Pal

6 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2005 :  06:31:35 AM  Show Profile Send SparkleyC a Private Message

Hello

As you can tell from the subject line, I am a complete novice, so I really need some advice.

I'm looking to buy some "How to..." books for crochet and have seen a few on the Rowan site, and on various other sites too. The trouble is, I have no idea which ones are best.


Please could someone kindly let me know of some good books - I'm really excited to learn a new skill!

Thanks everso


C

knittynoddy
Gabber Extraordinaire

460 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2005 :  10:37:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit knittynoddy's Homepage Send knittynoddy a Private Message
I carry an excellent crochet reference book in my store called The Crocheter's Companion by Nancy Brown.

She has instructions for the basic crochet stitches, as well as the more advanced stitches, illustrations, thread and hook charts, abbreviations, etc. The book is sized and bound to make it easy to carry in your project bag!

Evelyn

Knitty Noddy
www.knitty-noddy.com
Go to Top of Page

Patience
Permanent Resident

USA
1080 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2005 :  07:56:07 AM  Show Profile Send Patience a Private Message
C,

You might also consider purchasing a "how to crochet" video. I found it very helpful to actually SEE the techniques being done when I was learning, and I could follow along, pause, and rewind, if I didn't quite "get it". I guess it all depends on if you're a visual learner or if you understand the directions in a book. There are a couple available at www.patternworks.com along with a few crochet basic books. Good luck, and let us know what you decide.
Go to Top of Page

origami
Chatty Knitter

170 Posts

Posted - 09/02/2005 :  12:28:24 AM  Show Profile Send origami a Private Message
See http://www.stitchguide.com/ for online how-to videos for crochet (and knitting and plastic canvas and tatting and cross stitch). Between that and a basic book (try the local library), I quickly figured it out.
Go to Top of Page

zzzreading@yahoo.com
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2005 :  1:22:22 PM  Show Profile Send zzzreading@yahoo.com a Private Message
I am a librarian, and often will turn to a children's book first when I'm looking for an introduction to anything--gardening, astronomy, etc. The explanations are clear and concise, illustrations are usually good. The information is the most important, the extraneous left out...So I recommend you go to your local library and look for something in the kids' section. There is one I really like which is new, Kids Crochet: Projects for Kids of All Ages, by Kelli Ronci, from which I can't stop myself making the cupcake pincushions. Good luck!
Go to Top of Page

comfybev
Chatty Knitter

USA
256 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2005 :  2:39:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit comfybev's Homepage  Send comfybev a Yahoo! Message Send comfybev a Private Message
I agree with the suggestion of using a children's book, though I haven't seen the one Julie reccommends. I have seen the book Evelyn suggests and I do think it's a good one too.

You didn't mention if you are already a knitter, but for anyone I know who tries crochet after knitting, I always reccommend a few things. First, if you are a visual learner you may just want to ask around and get someone to show you. I know a lot of knitters who've been turned off crochet because images of loops were hard to change from knitting images. Secondly, go easy on yourself ... like any new skill it takes time, patience, and practice to get it in your head and to train your hands. Third, knitters are used to manipulating yarn and the needles stay (somewhat) stationary. In crochet, you will be manipulating the hook, not the yarn... so conceptually try to focus on the twisting of the hook, because otherwise it may be difficult to pick up.

Good luck!

Take care, Bev
http://bwdiaz.blogs.com/comfybev/
OTN: KR Gift Exchange project for Andrea "mtnknitter", Elizabeth I "Dainty Bess" lace scarf, "Go With the Flow" socks, "Classy Slip-Up" socks
2005 FO Count: 7
Go to Top of Page

pianogal
Seriously Hooked

629 Posts

Posted - 03/24/2006 :  8:38:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit pianogal's Homepage Send pianogal a Private Message
Comfy Bev, what wonderful advice. Very helpful.

http://abeginningknitter.blogspot.com
Go to Top of Page

KrazyKim
Chatty Knitter

USA
240 Posts

Posted - 03/28/2006 :  3:47:06 PM  Show Profile Send KrazyKim a Private Message
Julie,

Thanks for the great advice about libraries! I learned to knit from a library book, and then took crochet from an instructor. I've recently discovered the ease of ordering books from other libraries in my system (I'm lucky to live in a city with lots of branches - LA!), and so now, I have to try to find the one you recommended. Cupcake pincushions! A friend gave me a commercially crocheted cupcake Xmas ornament and I love it. Can't wait to try it myself! LOVE, LOVE, LOVE Libraries!

Kim, Playa del Rey, CA
Go to Top of Page

KrazyKim
Chatty Knitter

USA
240 Posts

Posted - 03/28/2006 :  3:54:11 PM  Show Profile Send KrazyKim a Private Message
What a coincidence... I just went to the KR section on free crochet patterns, looking for a particular topic, and it leapt out at me - a crocheted cupcake pattern! So, I've bookmarked it, but I still want to see Julie's recommended book. Can't have too many cupcakes!

Kim, Playa del Rey, CA
Go to Top of Page

KnittingLiz
Chatty Knitter

United Kingdom
147 Posts

Posted - 06/20/2006 :  08:07:22 AM  Show Profile Send KnittingLiz a Private Message
I've been trying to learn crochet for years but find it hard to pick up as I'm a knitter by nature. Anyway, I went along to a workshop at my lys ('Yarn' in Beeston, Notts) and did the 'Miss Bell' workshop and after 2 hours could miraculously crochet a flower! Thing is now I can't stop crocheting flowers and the house is full of them and I have even put away my knitting to do them! I bought the Debbie Stooler book and it is very good but I still needed someone to show me. I think that crochet is something that is hard to learn from a book but a lot easier to pick up by someone showing you how to do it. Good luck with it and I hope it won't be long before you become a 'happy hooker'!

Liz
Go to Top of Page

sgoldfried
Seriously Hooked

Canada
769 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2006 :  07:17:58 AM  Show Profile Send sgoldfried a Private Message
hi all
all of the above are good suggestions learn the basic stitches or at least one of them then sit down crochet it doesnt matter what you do just crochet back and forth make mistakes lots of them but continue the more you crochet the more you will start to recognize stitches mistakes how to rectify them or not
crochet is very visual do what you like dont look at the fancy stitches or patterns make yourself familuar with some of the basic stitches
i could only double crochet at the b eginning and i still dont use a pattern or fancy stitches but i improvise with the single half double and double crochet
i made a lot of blankets until i got used to crochet
learned how to make an even edge all by practicing
remember once is mistake twice is a mistake three times is a new stitch
try
sylvia
Go to Top of Page

sgoldfried
Seriously Hooked

Canada
769 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2006 :  07:54:35 AM  Show Profile Send sgoldfried a Private Message
hi
i forgot to say google crochet stitches there are some pretty clear pictures of each stitch
remember nothing is written in stone
sylvia
Go to Top of Page

PBELKNAP
Permanent Resident

USA
1136 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2006 :  08:09:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit PBELKNAP's Homepage Send PBELKNAP a Private Message
Believe it or not, despite all my books on crocheting, I still recommend one thing to people starting out with crocheting -- the Coats and Clark pamphlet "Learn to Crochet" (or some such title) at the local store (Michaels, AC Moore, Walmart, etc.). It has no nonsense instructions, plus a few easy projects.

I also like the idea of the on-line videos...I was having a tough time getting the hang of Triple Crochet until I saw the video demonstration on Stitchguide.

PAM

WIPs: One crocheted sweater and one knitted sweater (Christmas present).
Go to Top of Page

Stitching Fool
Chatty Knitter

196 Posts

Posted - 06/28/2007 :  4:05:05 PM  Show Profile Send Stitching Fool a Private Message
Attention novice or wanna-be crocheters:

I recently got the crochet bug since I kept seeing patterns in knitting mags&books that were crocheted. When my LYS was showing a gorgeous capelet made in cashmere that was crocheted, I knew it was time I moved beyond just putting a simple crocheted edging on my knitted sweaters. "The Happy Hooker" by Debbie Stoller will put you on the right track--it is just as well written, user-friendly, and upbeat and hip as her knitting books (which I also own). My 14 yo daughter and I basically taught ourselves all the stitches she presents in this book in a span of an evening and following morning this week (yup, school's out). I know went and bought (what more yarn) yarn for a new crocheted project and I am so excited to branch out! Give this book a try. I will also check out the other sources mentioned here--nothing a free videos and patters--love the internet!

Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.44 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe