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 What can a knitting machine do?
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kyench
Chatty Knitter

USA
205 Posts

Posted - 09/01/2005 :  07:56:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit kyench's Homepage Send kyench a Private Message
So, I've been handknitting for a while now and was wondering about a
knitting machine. For some reason, I sometimes get really impatient
with hand knitting. I'm a slow knitter and always want to FINISH
quick!!

I looked at the Sweater Machine at a local craft store and thought that
machine knitting can be quite limiting. That's why I'm posting to be
sure.

It seems to me that knitting machines do knit stitches very well. You
have to manipulate the thing for purls. And that's about it. The
machine says that you can also do cables and fair isle but requires
some manipulation.

Am I correct about this? I guess you really can't do knitting in the
round, decreases, increases, entrelac, bobbles and stuff like that?


KC
http://boiknit.blogspot.com/

Lanea
Permanent Resident

USA
5194 Posts

Posted - 09/01/2005 :  08:04:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit Lanea's Homepage Send Lanea a Private Message
Knitting machines like mine (untimate sweater machine) do increases and decreases and intarsia and simple cables and such, but you have to manipulate the hooks to make those things happen. They're great for cranking out flat sockinette, which is exactly what I use mine for. I use it primarily for felt-making purposes, but I would certainly use it for making blankets and simple sweater pieces and such too. I understand that the more expensive ones can do much more, but I doubt I'll ever shell out the money to learn the difference.

http://crazylanea.typepad.com/
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kfgardner
Chatty Knitter

USA
183 Posts

Posted - 09/01/2005 :  3:39:24 PM  Show Profile Send kfgardner a Private Message
I was not happy with my ultimate sweater machine. Stitches kept coming off the hooks and I spent more time rehooking than knitting. Purling was not so easy. I sent mine back. I thought it looked too easy on tv. Not worth the money in my opinion.

Yes, I'm a slow knitter too, but I like the results better from hand knitting than from machine.

Kimberly
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 09/01/2005 :  6:54:06 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
I had an excellent machine years ago. It served its purpose and I got rid of it. It will make yards and yards of knit fabric. So much so that you better enjoy assembling sweaters because you will spend most of your time finishing. Since that has never been my favorite task, I ended up with a laundry basket full of unfinished projects.

You also need a thorough understanding of sweater design and assembly. It's just my opinion, but I think it would be difficult to learn it on a machine without some concepts before.

However, I did receive some donated yarn the day before a church bazaar and turned out 38 hats in less than 24 hours. It is terrific for something like that, and shawls and afghans.

You cannot reproduce all hand knitting designs but then again you get a whole lot of others that you cannot reproduce by hand.

fran
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jade
Permanent Resident

USA
1543 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2005 :  06:56:31 AM  Show Profile Send jade a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by kyench

It seems to me that knitting machines do knit stitches very well. You
have to manipulate the thing for purls. And that's about it. The
machine says that you can also do cables and fair isle but requires
some manipulation.

Am I correct about this? I guess you really can't do knitting in the
round, decreases, increases, entrelac, bobbles and stuff like that?



It sounds like you looked at a basic or hobby machine. Most standard gauge machines can do fair isle, lace, increases and decreases (hand manipulation but very easy), bobbles,circular knitting and a whole lot more.

I've been amazed at what is possible with my machine which I've had for about 4 months. I've made socks, lace shawls and sweaters, plain stocking stitch sweaters, patterned and fair isle tops. And I'm just a beginner! I cast on for a lace shawl in laceweight mohair last night and over a couple of hours I got about 4' done. Can't beat that for speed.

It's not a replacement for hand knitting, at least not for me, but it extends what I can do enormously.

Cheryl
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of troy
Permanent Resident

USA
2474 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2005 :  08:29:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit of troy's Homepage Send of troy a Private Message
I know very little about knitting machines, but i know this:
the 'ultimate' knitting machine is one of the simplest, and does the 'fewest' things. its also one of the cheapest.

Bond, the company that makes them get high scores for working projects in third world countries, where it has sold the machines at a reduced cost, and helped women set up co-operative industries to earn money and enrich their community.

at about $100 Bond's Ultimate knitting machine is inexpensive.

fancy machines, with extra 'feed heads' can do intarsia, lace, cables, garter, ribbing.. (and cost upwards to $1000!



See my photo albums, (edit-NO PASSWORD REQUIRED) http://img78.photobucket.com/albums/v299/oftroy/
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