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eastofeden
Chatty Knitter

USA
177 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2005 :  12:36:11 PM  Show Profile Send eastofeden a Private Message
Earagon & Eldest by Christopher Paolini

Paolini wrote the first in this series when he was 15. Well written and very amazing. My sister who in not into the fantasy genre loved these. And of course my 15 year old DD loves these as well.

The Green Rider & First Riders Call by Kristen Britain

I had avoided reading fantasy novels for many years after becoming bored with the genre in my early 20's. Until I picked these up. Very exciting story about a female charactor who is maturing and growing. Although elements of the story may seem familiar these are probably the most orginal "new" fantasy novels that I have seen in a long time.

The Dark Hunter series by Sherrilyn Kenyon.

Some of these are much better than others. But they are escapist romance/fantasy novels. These are great when you want to check your brain at the door and just have some fun. These are rated R and I will not let my 15 year old read these yet.

The Di Piaget/MacLeod books by Lynn Kurland.

More escapist romance novels. Kurland's books do intertwine w/shared ancestors and common charactors etc; but each book stands on it's own. She covers all romance genre's including time travel, medieval and paranormal. Very fun feel good type of romance. These books are definately rated G...but this woman knows how to write a kiss that will knock your handknitted socks off!
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VickiKK
Seriously Hooked

935 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2005 :  2:25:06 PM  Show Profile Send VickiKK a Private Message
I second the books by McCall-Smith. There must be about five of them now.
Reading and knitting knitting and reading. I get really crabby when I have deadlines such as Christmas and can't find time to read. Last nite I stayed up until 1 am and read some of my book and I'm paying for it at work today: SEA MUSIC by Sara MacDonald. good read
Scott Turow's books are good.
Michael Connelly
Tom Clancy
Vicki near Seattle
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jaw
Seriously Hooked

USA
669 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2005 :  3:47:33 PM  Show Profile Send jaw a Private Message
One series a student introduced me to is by Dee Henderson. She is a Christian writer and the series has romance and mystery with a Christian background. I can't remember the series name at the moment, but it is about a group of adults who formed a family when they were in an orphanage. They have stuck together as adults and each is successful in their own right. Dee Henderson also has a second series - I think - True Valor is the name of it. I found them at Walden Bookstores. I really enjoyed them and the Christian theme is not overwhelming, but you know its there. If you like mysteries I really enjoy the Dana Stabenow - Kate Shugak series, the EArlene Fowler series with quilt names, Mary Daheim - the Alpine series and of course The Cat Who series by Lilian Jackson Braun and the Mrs. Murphy series by Rita May Brown.
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Inkmama
Seriously Hooked

891 Posts

Posted - 12/09/2005 :  08:24:14 AM  Show Profile  Visit Inkmama's Homepage Send Inkmama a Private Message
I love Anita Shreve's novels. Three make up a trilogy: Fortune's Rocks, Seaglass and The Pilot's Wife--not with characters but the setting (the house on the New England coast) where the novels take place. Highly recommend. I listened to all three on tape/CD while knitting or beading. Excellent! Oh, and there is always knitting in her books; however little, it's there.

Barbara

Writing blog: http://penonfire.blogspot.com

Knitting blog: http://knittingonfire.blogspot.com
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MMario
Permanent Resident

2211 Posts

Posted - 12/09/2005 :  08:35:28 AM  Show Profile Send MMario a Private Message
Tamara Pierce has several series - that though are marketed as juveniles are not bad reads. She has two connected sets of 4 - I believe called 'Circle of Magic' and'the Circle Opens' that I found fascinating. - then there is her "protector of the small" series, and another series about a female knight.

MMario - I don't live in the 21st century - but I play a character who does.
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lyndyn@yahoo.com


USA
Posts

Posted - 12/10/2005 :  10:41:31 PM  Show Profile Send lyndyn@yahoo.com a Private Message
Oooo...I love this topic. Have you read the Amelia Peabody mystery series by Elizabeth Peters? Amelia is a proper Victorian lady who falls in with murderers and Egyptologists at the end of the 1800's. During her adventures, she finds True Love, a lost oasis, various mummies and a Master Criminal. Sort of an Indiana Jones meets Sherlock Holmes meets Miss Marple sort of feel to them. You have to read them in order, though. There is just a frission of the supernatural as the series progresses. BTW: If you listen to books on tape - the series is read by Barbara Rosenblat and is Magnificent!

I just read Sarah Monette's new book Melusine (though there are some adult themes that some might find difficult). I loved it, though.

I'm eagerly awaiting the third installment in Greg Keyes' fantastic fantasy series The Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone saga. It is out in April and I can't wait.

OH - have you read any of Robin McKinley? Lovely fantasy. Anything by her is worth a look. I have her new novel Sunshine on my "read soon" heap.

How about Laura Kinsale? The Prince of Midnight and The Shadow and the Star - wonderful.

OK, I'll stop now. Did I mention that I'm a librarian??
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sallyjo
Permanent Resident

USA
2401 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2005 :  06:00:06 AM  Show Profile Send sallyjo a Private Message
For a series, try the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher. Harry Dresden is a wizard who works with the Chicago P.D. Somebody on a blog recommended them, and we devoured them over the summer. They get darker as the series goes on, and the last one isn't out yet, and there's going to be a movie or something that doesn't sound very good, but the books are fun.
And, of course, Dorothy Sayers' detective novels with Lord Peter Wimsey.

"We all have our strengths and our weaknesses."
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Marg in Mirror
Permanent Resident

Canada
3205 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2005 :  10:08:57 AM  Show Profile  Visit Marg in Mirror's Homepage  Send Marg in Mirror a Yahoo! Message Send Marg in Mirror a Private Message
I like Madeleine L'Engle's "Wrinkle in Time", "The Wind in the Door" etc. series, and her "Crosswicks Journals" -- an autobiographical series of 4 books.

For mystery buffs, there's the "Crewel World" etc series by Monica Ferris (knitting, stitching play a part) and the quilting mystery series by Earlene Fowler.

On what I'd call 'light' fare, there are also the wonderful (if slightly schmalzy) books by Debbie Macomber (besides her yarn shop books). I particularly enjoy the numbered series, where each title is a home address.

If you like the Green Gables books, chances are you'd like Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women", "Little Men", "Eight Cousins" and "Jo's Boys"...Also the Little House books (great for sharing with a little girl). And as far as Green Gables goes, did you get to the 'spin offs' that Montgomery wrote, like "Emily of New Moon" and "Rilla of Ingleside"?

Then there are the 3 KnitLit books of essays...

Enjoy!

-- Marg (Knittin' and readin') in Calgary





TLWKOTB
http://knitsonthebus.blogspot.com
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Nanaknit
Chatty Knitter

287 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2005 :  4:13:37 PM  Show Profile Send Nanaknit a Private Message
I remember the "Wrinkle In Time" series from grade school. My teacher in the fifth grade read it to every one of her classes, including my brother, sister and two daughters. Now my grandaughter is reading it herself as Mrs. Elliott has retired and taken to working in our local "Friends Of The Libray" store.

I agree the Amelia Peabody books are great to listen to on audio. She's hysterical!

Thanks everyone for all of the other great ideas-now if I could just figure out a way to knit and read at the same time!!

Linda

"Honey, a man can't keep his gun in a cookie jar. It just isn't done!"
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booglass
Permanent Resident

Costa Rica
1987 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2005 :  5:52:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit booglass's Homepage Send booglass a Private Message
I just added the Elizabeth Peters books to my wish list on Amazon. Maybe someone will notice!

bonnie

Check out my blog:
http://www.booglass.typepad.com
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Chayah
Permanent Resident

1927 Posts

Posted - 12/12/2005 :  07:22:43 AM  Show Profile Send Chayah a Private Message
If you like mysteries, try Donna Leon's series set in present-day Venice. The first one is called Murder at La Fenice. A wonderful detective and a slice of life in Italy. Probably my favorite series.
Chayah
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Marg in Mirror
Permanent Resident

Canada
3205 Posts

Posted - 12/12/2005 :  5:15:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Marg in Mirror's Homepage  Send Marg in Mirror a Yahoo! Message Send Marg in Mirror a Private Message
"...now if I could just figure out a way to knit and read at the same time!!"

To do this, I use either a book weight, which holds the pages down (the book is lying on a flat surface, such as the table in front of me), or a stand, which props the book up on the table. Either works well!

-- Marg (knittin' and readin') in Calgary



TLWKOTB
http://knitsonthebus.blogspot.com
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Nanaknit
Chatty Knitter

287 Posts

Posted - 12/12/2005 :  6:51:24 PM  Show Profile Send Nanaknit a Private Message
What a great idea, Marg! I'll give it a try. Thanks,

Linda

"Honey, a man can't keep his gun in a cookie jar. It just isn't done!" - Janet Evanovich
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caeebe
Chatty Knitter

346 Posts

Posted - 12/12/2005 :  6:53:59 PM  Show Profile Send caeebe a Private Message
I love this topic. It is so perfect. I read a lot and quickly but I hate choosing books. Unfortunately none of my friends read as much as I do so I've already been through all of their books. Thank you for all the recommendations. I can't believe how many female authors have come up.

I just finished reading 3 Kim Harrison books starting with Dead Witch Walking They are witchy, vampire books a la Buffy. They were light, fun reads. Watch out for adult themes though, there was some swearing and a bit of sex/romance.

I am part of a library system that lets me "check out" adobe pdf versions of books to my home computer. It is easy to read and knit when all you have to do to turn pages is press a mouse button.
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lyndyn@yahoo.com


USA
Posts

Posted - 12/13/2005 :  10:32:26 AM  Show Profile Send lyndyn@yahoo.com a Private Message
I listen to books on tape or cd while I knit! The best of both worlds. (Only UNABRIDGED!!)

I love the Donna Leon books - very good on audio, too. I may end up getting an IPOD just to listen to books that way, too!

I have Dead Witch Walking at home to read - I loved Buffy! The complete series DVD set is on MY wish list at amazon!

If you like witchy mysteries, get your hands on the Bast series by Rosemary Edghill. There are three of them to date and have been collected in a three book anthology called Bell Book and Murder. I love 'em.
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eastofeden
Chatty Knitter

USA
177 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2005 :  12:02:19 PM  Show Profile Send eastofeden a Private Message
Okay...So I now move from my fantasy bent to a mystery/sleuth bent.

The Lord Peter Wimsey series by Dorothy Sayers.

Sayers was a contempary and friend of C.S. Lewis. These are set in the early 20's and have Lord Peter solving mysteries. Generally written as a sataire of the english class system these are delightfully written and have stood the test of time. Lord Peter's manservant Bunter is said to have inspired P.G. Wodehouse...speaking of which......

The Jeeves series by P.G. Wodehouse.

Gentleman Wooster (a bit of a dandy) and his long suffering valet Jeeves. These stories are laugh out loud funny and have stood the test of time. Great book to leave your troubles behind with.
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lucienh
Honorary Angel

919 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2005 :  06:19:57 AM  Show Profile Send lucienh a Private Message
Yes! Everyone is either suggesting my old favorites or books I really want to read. She's been mentioned before,on another thread, but read Connie Willis's To Say Nothing of the Dog just after you finish several Dorothy Sayers.
The first Miles Vorkosigan is Shards of Honor. Definitely a series to read from the beginning, because the characters develop beautifully.
And no one has mentioned Dorothy Dunnett's Game of Kings series. I've been in love with Lymond since I read the first one. Very dense and a bit hard to get into, but wow!
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lyndyn@yahoo.com


USA
Posts

Posted - 12/14/2005 :  3:52:18 PM  Show Profile Send lyndyn@yahoo.com a Private Message
If you like creative non-fiction - I just finished The Lost Painting by Jonathan Harr. It is the story of how a painting by Caravaggio is found after being missing for two centuries.
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momslake
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
559 Posts

Posted - 12/15/2005 :  12:14:24 AM  Show Profile Send momslake a Private Message
One of the best young adult fantasy series I've ever read is Susan Cooper's "Dark is Rising" series. Five books, three of them Newbery winners or honor books. IMHO, I prefer this series over Narnia, LOTR, Prydain Chronicles and even over Harry Potter. Maybe it's my Welsh ancestry.

The books, in order, are: Over Sea, Under Stone; The Dark is Rising; Greenwitch; The Grey King; and Silver on the Tree.

Another YA series I love is Sylvia Louise Engdahl's "Tomorrow Mountains" series, which is science fiction. Those books are: This Star Shall Abide; Beyond the Tomorrow Mountains; and The Doors Of (or To?) the Universe. I'm not sure these are still in print, though.

"In the northern wilderness, where wool is a way of life."
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eastofeden
Chatty Knitter

USA
177 Posts

Posted - 12/16/2005 :  09:00:38 AM  Show Profile Send eastofeden a Private Message
I have to agree with Momslake about Susan Cooper's Dark is Rising series. One of my childhood favorites that I go back and re-read on occassion. My daughter also enjoys this series as well.
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