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cgseekins@earthlink.net
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  2:20:08 PM  Show Profile Send cgseekins@earthlink.net a Private Message
Knitters elbow ,can be from resting your arm on an arm chair,while knitting,and can effect the elbow also,by pushing on the nerves.
I now have Pheriphal neuropothy in both hands ,and cant spin knit or weave,there dosnt seem to be any solution to the problem,
therefore I sit with both hands in heated pillows,looking at the projects I have made ,through the years and look at my beautifull hand knit sox on my feet,that I wondered what I would do with all of them after making 25 pair for Grandchildren last Christmas,
Knit while you are able ,but take time to rest and lift the tea cup,in between
Reha Seekins
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cgseekins@earthlink.net
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  2:20:08 PM  Show Profile Send cgseekins@earthlink.net a Private Message
Knitters elbow ,can be from resting your arm on an arm chair,while knitting,and can effect the elbow also,by pushing on the nerves.
I now have Pheriphal neuropothy in both hands ,and cant spin knit or weave,there dosnt seem to be any solution to the problem,
therefore I sit with both hands in heated pillows,looking at the projects I have made ,through the years and look at my beautifull hand knit sox on my feet,that I wondered what I would do with all of them after making 25 pair for Grandchildren last Christmas,
Knit while you are able ,but take time to rest and lift the tea cup,in between
Reha Seekins
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sharienne
Warming Up

USA
64 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  2:53:56 PM  Show Profile Send sharienne a Private Message
The wrist/elbow/shoulder problems are all pains that I have. I also have fibromyalgia and so it can take me months of rest to recover enough to return to knitting. I have found one thing that works.

Try a myotherapist or a physical therapist who works with trigger points. Bonnie Prudden myotherapists are listed on her website. The Pittsburgh School of Pain Management also maintains lists of therapists who specialize in myotherapy. Physical therapists might be more likely to use a technique called strain/counterstrain by Dr. Jones. Both of these techniques are based on Dr. Janet Travell's work on trigger points.

Either works so well for me that I almost have to call it a miracle.

If there are no therapists in your area specializing in these techniques, I have thought it might work to go to a physical therapy clinic and ask the manager if they would be interested in sending one of their therapists to the Bonnie Pudden School or to Pittsburgh school and they would have you as a patient.

I have been lucky to be in an area that has both kinds of professionals, but I might be moving soon to an area that doesn't. If anyone wants to pursue getting the therapy center in their area to get the trining, I would be interested in finding out if my strategy works.
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sharienne
Warming Up

USA
64 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  2:53:56 PM  Show Profile Send sharienne a Private Message
The wrist/elbow/shoulder problems are all pains that I have. I also have fibromyalgia and so it can take me months of rest to recover enough to return to knitting. I have found one thing that works.

Try a myotherapist or a physical therapist who works with trigger points. Bonnie Prudden myotherapists are listed on her website. The Pittsburgh School of Pain Management also maintains lists of therapists who specialize in myotherapy. Physical therapists might be more likely to use a technique called strain/counterstrain by Dr. Jones. Both of these techniques are based on Dr. Janet Travell's work on trigger points.

Either works so well for me that I almost have to call it a miracle.

If there are no therapists in your area specializing in these techniques, I have thought it might work to go to a physical therapy clinic and ask the manager if they would be interested in sending one of their therapists to the Bonnie Pudden School or to Pittsburgh school and they would have you as a patient.

I have been lucky to be in an area that has both kinds of professionals, but I might be moving soon to an area that doesn't. If anyone wants to pursue getting the therapy center in their area to get the trining, I would be interested in finding out if my strategy works.
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sharienne
Warming Up

USA
64 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  2:53:56 PM  Show Profile Send sharienne a Private Message
The wrist/elbow/shoulder problems are all pains that I have. I also have fibromyalgia and so it can take me months of rest to recover enough to return to knitting. I have found one thing that works.

Try a myotherapist or a physical therapist who works with trigger points. Bonnie Prudden myotherapists are listed on her website. The Pittsburgh School of Pain Management also maintains lists of therapists who specialize in myotherapy. Physical therapists might be more likely to use a technique called strain/counterstrain by Dr. Jones. Both of these techniques are based on Dr. Janet Travell's work on trigger points.

Either works so well for me that I almost have to call it a miracle.

If there are no therapists in your area specializing in these techniques, I have thought it might work to go to a physical therapy clinic and ask the manager if they would be interested in sending one of their therapists to the Bonnie Pudden School or to Pittsburgh school and they would have you as a patient.

I have been lucky to be in an area that has both kinds of professionals, but I might be moving soon to an area that doesn't. If anyone wants to pursue getting the therapy center in their area to get the trining, I would be interested in finding out if my strategy works.
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knitknit
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:18:49 PM  Show Profile Send knitknit a Private Message
Hi Rhonda: Fran and Melanie are on target with this one. I'm a therapist who's worked with a lot of people who have repetitive injuries. What we're talking about is some kind of repetitive motion that's caused inflammation. The inflammation feels like pain. So we're suggestion first that you take a break and let the muscle heal, or try something new like spinning, secondly that you examine your technique to determine if something you're doing is contributing to the experience. Continental is a great suggestion and will be fun to learn, you know you're on the right track when it doesn't reappear. Also working with a pt or mt to release tight muscles would help long term. Super question. Thanks.

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knitknit
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:18:49 PM  Show Profile Send knitknit a Private Message
Hi Rhonda: Fran and Melanie are on target with this one. I'm a therapist who's worked with a lot of people who have repetitive injuries. What we're talking about is some kind of repetitive motion that's caused inflammation. The inflammation feels like pain. So we're suggestion first that you take a break and let the muscle heal, or try something new like spinning, secondly that you examine your technique to determine if something you're doing is contributing to the experience. Continental is a great suggestion and will be fun to learn, you know you're on the right track when it doesn't reappear. Also working with a pt or mt to release tight muscles would help long term. Super question. Thanks.

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knitknit
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:18:49 PM  Show Profile Send knitknit a Private Message
Hi Rhonda: Fran and Melanie are on target with this one. I'm a therapist who's worked with a lot of people who have repetitive injuries. What we're talking about is some kind of repetitive motion that's caused inflammation. The inflammation feels like pain. So we're suggestion first that you take a break and let the muscle heal, or try something new like spinning, secondly that you examine your technique to determine if something you're doing is contributing to the experience. Continental is a great suggestion and will be fun to learn, you know you're on the right track when it doesn't reappear. Also working with a pt or mt to release tight muscles would help long term. Super question. Thanks.

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knitknit
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:25:21 PM  Show Profile Send knitknit a Private Message
Yes, Travell's work is incredibly effective in releasing injuries and I would strongly suggest it for anyone who is suffering from knitting. It is a deep pressure technique designed to repattern muscles. If you're reading the other postings you'll note, Rhonda, that this condition can get a LOT worse. The other thing that this technique is called is "neuromuscular therapy" which is a kind of offshoot of Travel's work and there may be additional postings on www.upledger.com for skilled workers in this technique. Also a rolfer, or structural integration person, and myofascial release therapist would be helpful. Just some ideas in case you're in an area with limited resources.

When I started on rehab, I paid for my therapist to take a knee injury course! She worked off the balance and I got better. Just some creative ideas.

Let us know how you do. In the meantime, put the needles down and go do some yoga!

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knitknit
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:25:21 PM  Show Profile Send knitknit a Private Message
Yes, Travell's work is incredibly effective in releasing injuries and I would strongly suggest it for anyone who is suffering from knitting. It is a deep pressure technique designed to repattern muscles. If you're reading the other postings you'll note, Rhonda, that this condition can get a LOT worse. The other thing that this technique is called is "neuromuscular therapy" which is a kind of offshoot of Travel's work and there may be additional postings on www.upledger.com for skilled workers in this technique. Also a rolfer, or structural integration person, and myofascial release therapist would be helpful. Just some ideas in case you're in an area with limited resources.

When I started on rehab, I paid for my therapist to take a knee injury course! She worked off the balance and I got better. Just some creative ideas.

Let us know how you do. In the meantime, put the needles down and go do some yoga!

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knitknit
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:25:21 PM  Show Profile Send knitknit a Private Message
Yes, Travell's work is incredibly effective in releasing injuries and I would strongly suggest it for anyone who is suffering from knitting. It is a deep pressure technique designed to repattern muscles. If you're reading the other postings you'll note, Rhonda, that this condition can get a LOT worse. The other thing that this technique is called is "neuromuscular therapy" which is a kind of offshoot of Travel's work and there may be additional postings on www.upledger.com for skilled workers in this technique. Also a rolfer, or structural integration person, and myofascial release therapist would be helpful. Just some ideas in case you're in an area with limited resources.

When I started on rehab, I paid for my therapist to take a knee injury course! She worked off the balance and I got better. Just some creative ideas.

Let us know how you do. In the meantime, put the needles down and go do some yoga!

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welshladygwen@citlink.net
New Pal

9 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:52:48 PM  Show Profile Send welshladygwen@citlink.net a Private Message
I have been having trigger point injections in the area between the shoulder blade & spine. I had 2 injections yesterday. The first time lasted for 2 months! Absolutely astounding! Today, I'm still having some pain, but reduced... hoping massage & chiropractic work will help. I do need to find someone who does excellent myofascial release, altho it makes me terribly ill for days - a result of the fibromyalgia, I think. I will not attempt it without having narcotics on hand.
I also have trigger points on the outside of my elbow. I'm going to try out my DH's tennis elbow brace. I also have [we think] carpal tunnel in both arms. However, w/ overactivity, the trigger points in my back will paralyze my arm ... last time it took over a year to get relief. 2 different massage therapists who did a great job have moved away & the most recent one didn't work deeply enough... leaving me out of pocket w/ no relief.
Physical therapy doesn't help me. W/ the exception of those MARVELOUS hot packs & various electro-stim machines & ultrasound. <G> But I always see that part as pure luxury! LOL
Hugs, Jennifer
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welshladygwen@citlink.net
New Pal

9 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:52:48 PM  Show Profile Send welshladygwen@citlink.net a Private Message
I have been having trigger point injections in the area between the shoulder blade & spine. I had 2 injections yesterday. The first time lasted for 2 months! Absolutely astounding! Today, I'm still having some pain, but reduced... hoping massage & chiropractic work will help. I do need to find someone who does excellent myofascial release, altho it makes me terribly ill for days - a result of the fibromyalgia, I think. I will not attempt it without having narcotics on hand.
I also have trigger points on the outside of my elbow. I'm going to try out my DH's tennis elbow brace. I also have [we think] carpal tunnel in both arms. However, w/ overactivity, the trigger points in my back will paralyze my arm ... last time it took over a year to get relief. 2 different massage therapists who did a great job have moved away & the most recent one didn't work deeply enough... leaving me out of pocket w/ no relief.
Physical therapy doesn't help me. W/ the exception of those MARVELOUS hot packs & various electro-stim machines & ultrasound. <G> But I always see that part as pure luxury! LOL
Hugs, Jennifer
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welshladygwen@citlink.net
New Pal

9 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  3:52:48 PM  Show Profile Send welshladygwen@citlink.net a Private Message
I have been having trigger point injections in the area between the shoulder blade & spine. I had 2 injections yesterday. The first time lasted for 2 months! Absolutely astounding! Today, I'm still having some pain, but reduced... hoping massage & chiropractic work will help. I do need to find someone who does excellent myofascial release, altho it makes me terribly ill for days - a result of the fibromyalgia, I think. I will not attempt it without having narcotics on hand.
I also have trigger points on the outside of my elbow. I'm going to try out my DH's tennis elbow brace. I also have [we think] carpal tunnel in both arms. However, w/ overactivity, the trigger points in my back will paralyze my arm ... last time it took over a year to get relief. 2 different massage therapists who did a great job have moved away & the most recent one didn't work deeply enough... leaving me out of pocket w/ no relief.
Physical therapy doesn't help me. W/ the exception of those MARVELOUS hot packs & various electro-stim machines & ultrasound. <G> But I always see that part as pure luxury! LOL
Hugs, Jennifer
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cpeterson
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  4:37:59 PM  Show Profile Send cpeterson a Private Message
I am currently in the recovery phase for my second bout with knitter's elbow. The first recovered by my quitting my computer intensive job (a costly but mentally wonderful cure). The current elbow flared up about 14 months ago. Went to the doctor and tried all the usual stuff - braces, rest, ice, heat, NSAIDS, etc. with little success. Started an alternative to cortisone (which I am strongly opposed to using) in December called PROLOTHERAPY and it is really helping. Of course, part of my problem appears to be a case of fibromyalgia. Still, I really encourage people to look into prolo. It's been around for about 40 years and has fans that include C. Everett Koop - former surgeon general of the USA.

CCP (Colorado Springs)

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cpeterson
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  4:37:59 PM  Show Profile Send cpeterson a Private Message
I am currently in the recovery phase for my second bout with knitter's elbow. The first recovered by my quitting my computer intensive job (a costly but mentally wonderful cure). The current elbow flared up about 14 months ago. Went to the doctor and tried all the usual stuff - braces, rest, ice, heat, NSAIDS, etc. with little success. Started an alternative to cortisone (which I am strongly opposed to using) in December called PROLOTHERAPY and it is really helping. Of course, part of my problem appears to be a case of fibromyalgia. Still, I really encourage people to look into prolo. It's been around for about 40 years and has fans that include C. Everett Koop - former surgeon general of the USA.

CCP (Colorado Springs)

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quiltress
New Pal

USA
10 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  4:41:37 PM  Show Profile Send quiltress a Private Message
I too suffer from fibro and myofascial pain syndrome, have had both carpal and cubital tunnel surgeries on right hand and elbow. I had to give up knitting for 3 yrs but am back at it on a more limited basis. That's the key - knowing when to stop - put those needles down as soon as you feel your pain areas tightening up, even if its in the middle of a row and come back to it later. I can no longer work due to the fibro, arthritis and diabetes - but NOTHING will keep me from making things for my first grandbaby.

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quiltress
New Pal

USA
10 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  4:41:37 PM  Show Profile Send quiltress a Private Message
I too suffer from fibro and myofascial pain syndrome, have had both carpal and cubital tunnel surgeries on right hand and elbow. I had to give up knitting for 3 yrs but am back at it on a more limited basis. That's the key - knowing when to stop - put those needles down as soon as you feel your pain areas tightening up, even if its in the middle of a row and come back to it later. I can no longer work due to the fibro, arthritis and diabetes - but NOTHING will keep me from making things for my first grandbaby.

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quiltress
New Pal

USA
10 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  4:41:37 PM  Show Profile Send quiltress a Private Message
I too suffer from fibro and myofascial pain syndrome, have had both carpal and cubital tunnel surgeries on right hand and elbow. I had to give up knitting for 3 yrs but am back at it on a more limited basis. That's the key - knowing when to stop - put those needles down as soon as you feel your pain areas tightening up, even if its in the middle of a row and come back to it later. I can no longer work due to the fibro, arthritis and diabetes - but NOTHING will keep me from making things for my first grandbaby.

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sabknits
New Pal

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2003 :  4:48:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit sabknits's Homepage Send sabknits a Private Message
I've suffered from sore wrists, elbows, shoulders, fingers...but never, never from knitting!! Oh, no, those were all caused by schlepping laundry, vacuuming, shoveling snow, keyboarding, never, never by knitting!! (Denial! Denial! Denial!)

If you have a problem you should see your physician and have it treated! A home remedy that works for one may be detrimental to another. Find out what the problem really is and what's causing it...if it's really the knitting and you really don't want to stop find a way to relieve the pressure....or take up some other fiber related art...like spinning or dyeing! They're fun too! sab

sab
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