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Kristin
Seriously Hooked

USA
606 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  09:44:39 AM  Show Profile Send Kristin a Private Message
Here's my response which I e-mailed to the author of the article:

Dear Tonya,

I read your article online regarding knitting and your viewpoint that young women are knitting in order to "nest" and avoid fears about 9/11 & war.

I'm 33 years old and I live in Chicago. I've been knitting since the age of 8 when I taught MYSELF how to knit from a book because it looked like fun. No one made me learn to knit because it was a "girly" thing to do.

Why do I continue to knit? For the sheer enjoyment I get from knitting. Knitting is one task where you're exercising your right brain (creativity) and left brain (mathematical thinking) at the same time. I take great pride in the items I knit. It's relaxing, it's enjoyable. I'd much rather spend my idle time knitting & being productive than vegging out in front of the TV. Talk about sticking your head in the sand!

Am I trying to be Aunt Bee or Mrs. Cleaver? I think not! I work full-time and my husband is a full-time stay-at-home dad. I bring home the bacon, he fries it up in the pan. I don't clean house all day while wearing pearls & high heels, I'm out in the work force, earning a living for my family.

I understand the point you were trying to make: people using a hobby as an esacpe mechanism. However, I don't think you actually spent much time talking to REAL knitters. We don't do it to stick out heads in the sand, we do it because we love to knit. I'm not a "nester" nor am I a girly-girl.

In this wonderful country of ours, we are free to express our opinions. You have expressed yours but I will have to disagree. I think you have pegged knitters in an unfair stereotype. We are free-thinking, creative people, not Mrs. Cleaver & Aunt Bee!

Kindest Regards,


--Kristin

"A little nonsense now & then is relished by the wisest men." --Roald Dahl
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Jane
SustaYning Member

USA
4376 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  09:48:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit Jane's Homepage Send Jane a Private Message
Unbelievable. Incredibly narrow-minded. Probably not even deserving of my anger, but it's too late to stop it now! I don't even know what to say to her that could convey this, this.... She deserves a ! !

Jane
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Jane
SustaYning Member

USA
4376 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  09:48:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit Jane's Homepage Send Jane a Private Message
Unbelievable. Incredibly narrow-minded. Probably not even deserving of my anger, but it's too late to stop it now! I don't even know what to say to her that could convey this, this.... She deserves a ! !

Jane
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Jane
SustaYning Member

USA
4376 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  09:48:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit Jane's Homepage Send Jane a Private Message
Unbelievable. Incredibly narrow-minded. Probably not even deserving of my anger, but it's too late to stop it now! I don't even know what to say to her that could convey this, this.... She deserves a ! !

Jane
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chris
Permanent Resident

USA
2463 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  10:22:23 AM  Show Profile Send chris a Private Message
I'm sure she will think that any response she gets is because she touched a raw nerve...hit the nail on the head, etc. But I wrote to her. Here 'tis:

I was just made aware of your article in the Charlotte Observer. Wow.

False sense of control? No, George W. Bush has taken all feelings of security and control away from me. Besides, until you drop a stitch in a lace shawl, you have no idea how little control you have in knitting. Hiding? No, I’m out there knitting in public, showing my creativity to the world. Going back to Mayberry and Aunt Bee? I detested that show even as a child. Talk about fantasy. My reality was much different from Mayberry. It included strong women who managed homes and families, worked long hours, didn’t have Merry Maids to clean their homes and Chem Lawn to take care of the yard, and didn’t go “out to eat” or have take out for every meal.

I’m not under 35, but I’m definitely part of this new knitting craze. I started knitting about 19 months ago. Since then, I’ve made placemats as Christmas gifts for my family (my husband has been out of work for more than 9 months…we had to use the money we’d saved to buy gifts to live on, so I gave gifts of love and a little yarn), numerous hats and scarves, a sweater, and a couple pairs of socks. Am I nesting? Am I cocooning? No. Not on your life, honey. I’ve worked my entire adult life, beginning in 1969 when I turned 16. It’ll be 34 years this summer that I’ve done the feminist thing, working, taking care of home and family, leaving very little left over for myself. All those years, I felt the urge to be creative, but had to push it to the back burner (if you’ll allow me that home ec-ish term) while I did the 70s feminist thing. I deserve the break.

The kids are grown and out of the house. I *finally* have time for myself, to do the things I’ve longed to do for years. What popped up for me? I wanted to sew…not clothes for myself and my kids, but creative sewing –costumes for the Renaissance Faire. I wanted to cook meals that took more than 15 minutes to toss together and wolf down between getting home from work and rushing out to soccer games. I wanted to learn to knit. I so clearly remember the satisfaction I saw on my grandmother’s face when she finished a knitted item. She had the ability to create something so lovely using two sticks and a string. I now have that ability, not as polished as hers, but it’s getting there. And it corrects a flaw in me which I acquired during the years I spent overachieving as a wife, mother, and worker: it keeps my hands busy when I would normally be sitting idle. I can’t seem to sit and do nothing…I keep looking for something else that MUST be done. Knitting quiets that voice that says “you should be accomplishing something”.

Ms. Jameson, has nothing to do with Martha Stewart, your home-ec teacher, going back to Mayberry or anything remotely like that. What it does have to do with is creating. Making something from almost nothing. Giving a part of yourself to someone in a knitted gift, rather than something you bought at a chain department store. Shooting hoops just doesn’t accomplish the same thing, nor does wasting your life working. Believe me, I know. I’ve been there, I’ve done that. I also think that part of this “embracing all kinds of do it yourself projects” is a backlash against the over-mechanized, mass produced, computer generated times we live in. Everything is done for us. If we don’t hang on to doing some things ourselves, there will be no traditions with which to reconnect. And those of you who have not learned to cook had better do so before the economy tanks any more and your usual eateries close down. You might starve to death.

If you’re ever in the Phoenix area, look me up. I’d be happy to prepare you a delicious meal, none of which will be from “prepared” food or take out. It will be creatively made probably from a recipe I learned watching the Food Network while knitting. But the skills necessary to prepare it will be the ones passed down from my grandmother and mother, aided a bit by my home ec teacher. Oh, and by the way…since I used to live in that area, I know it’s cold in Charlotte. Would you like a nice knitted hat – not to hide in but to keep your head warm?

Chris Salvatore


Keep on knittin', mama, knittin' those blues away!
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chris
Permanent Resident

USA
2463 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  10:22:23 AM  Show Profile Send chris a Private Message
I'm sure she will think that any response she gets is because she touched a raw nerve...hit the nail on the head, etc. But I wrote to her. Here 'tis:

I was just made aware of your article in the Charlotte Observer. Wow.

False sense of control? No, George W. Bush has taken all feelings of security and control away from me. Besides, until you drop a stitch in a lace shawl, you have no idea how little control you have in knitting. Hiding? No, I’m out there knitting in public, showing my creativity to the world. Going back to Mayberry and Aunt Bee? I detested that show even as a child. Talk about fantasy. My reality was much different from Mayberry. It included strong women who managed homes and families, worked long hours, didn’t have Merry Maids to clean their homes and Chem Lawn to take care of the yard, and didn’t go “out to eat” or have take out for every meal.

I’m not under 35, but I’m definitely part of this new knitting craze. I started knitting about 19 months ago. Since then, I’ve made placemats as Christmas gifts for my family (my husband has been out of work for more than 9 months…we had to use the money we’d saved to buy gifts to live on, so I gave gifts of love and a little yarn), numerous hats and scarves, a sweater, and a couple pairs of socks. Am I nesting? Am I cocooning? No. Not on your life, honey. I’ve worked my entire adult life, beginning in 1969 when I turned 16. It’ll be 34 years this summer that I’ve done the feminist thing, working, taking care of home and family, leaving very little left over for myself. All those years, I felt the urge to be creative, but had to push it to the back burner (if you’ll allow me that home ec-ish term) while I did the 70s feminist thing. I deserve the break.

The kids are grown and out of the house. I *finally* have time for myself, to do the things I’ve longed to do for years. What popped up for me? I wanted to sew…not clothes for myself and my kids, but creative sewing –costumes for the Renaissance Faire. I wanted to cook meals that took more than 15 minutes to toss together and wolf down between getting home from work and rushing out to soccer games. I wanted to learn to knit. I so clearly remember the satisfaction I saw on my grandmother’s face when she finished a knitted item. She had the ability to create something so lovely using two sticks and a string. I now have that ability, not as polished as hers, but it’s getting there. And it corrects a flaw in me which I acquired during the years I spent overachieving as a wife, mother, and worker: it keeps my hands busy when I would normally be sitting idle. I can’t seem to sit and do nothing…I keep looking for something else that MUST be done. Knitting quiets that voice that says “you should be accomplishing something”.

Ms. Jameson, has nothing to do with Martha Stewart, your home-ec teacher, going back to Mayberry or anything remotely like that. What it does have to do with is creating. Making something from almost nothing. Giving a part of yourself to someone in a knitted gift, rather than something you bought at a chain department store. Shooting hoops just doesn’t accomplish the same thing, nor does wasting your life working. Believe me, I know. I’ve been there, I’ve done that. I also think that part of this “embracing all kinds of do it yourself projects” is a backlash against the over-mechanized, mass produced, computer generated times we live in. Everything is done for us. If we don’t hang on to doing some things ourselves, there will be no traditions with which to reconnect. And those of you who have not learned to cook had better do so before the economy tanks any more and your usual eateries close down. You might starve to death.

If you’re ever in the Phoenix area, look me up. I’d be happy to prepare you a delicious meal, none of which will be from “prepared” food or take out. It will be creatively made probably from a recipe I learned watching the Food Network while knitting. But the skills necessary to prepare it will be the ones passed down from my grandmother and mother, aided a bit by my home ec teacher. Oh, and by the way…since I used to live in that area, I know it’s cold in Charlotte. Would you like a nice knitted hat – not to hide in but to keep your head warm?

Chris Salvatore


Keep on knittin', mama, knittin' those blues away!
Go to Top of Page

chris
Permanent Resident

USA
2463 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  10:22:23 AM  Show Profile Send chris a Private Message
I'm sure she will think that any response she gets is because she touched a raw nerve...hit the nail on the head, etc. But I wrote to her. Here 'tis:

I was just made aware of your article in the Charlotte Observer. Wow.

False sense of control? No, George W. Bush has taken all feelings of security and control away from me. Besides, until you drop a stitch in a lace shawl, you have no idea how little control you have in knitting. Hiding? No, I’m out there knitting in public, showing my creativity to the world. Going back to Mayberry and Aunt Bee? I detested that show even as a child. Talk about fantasy. My reality was much different from Mayberry. It included strong women who managed homes and families, worked long hours, didn’t have Merry Maids to clean their homes and Chem Lawn to take care of the yard, and didn’t go “out to eat” or have take out for every meal.

I’m not under 35, but I’m definitely part of this new knitting craze. I started knitting about 19 months ago. Since then, I’ve made placemats as Christmas gifts for my family (my husband has been out of work for more than 9 months…we had to use the money we’d saved to buy gifts to live on, so I gave gifts of love and a little yarn), numerous hats and scarves, a sweater, and a couple pairs of socks. Am I nesting? Am I cocooning? No. Not on your life, honey. I’ve worked my entire adult life, beginning in 1969 when I turned 16. It’ll be 34 years this summer that I’ve done the feminist thing, working, taking care of home and family, leaving very little left over for myself. All those years, I felt the urge to be creative, but had to push it to the back burner (if you’ll allow me that home ec-ish term) while I did the 70s feminist thing. I deserve the break.

The kids are grown and out of the house. I *finally* have time for myself, to do the things I’ve longed to do for years. What popped up for me? I wanted to sew…not clothes for myself and my kids, but creative sewing –costumes for the Renaissance Faire. I wanted to cook meals that took more than 15 minutes to toss together and wolf down between getting home from work and rushing out to soccer games. I wanted to learn to knit. I so clearly remember the satisfaction I saw on my grandmother’s face when she finished a knitted item. She had the ability to create something so lovely using two sticks and a string. I now have that ability, not as polished as hers, but it’s getting there. And it corrects a flaw in me which I acquired during the years I spent overachieving as a wife, mother, and worker: it keeps my hands busy when I would normally be sitting idle. I can’t seem to sit and do nothing…I keep looking for something else that MUST be done. Knitting quiets that voice that says “you should be accomplishing something”.

Ms. Jameson, has nothing to do with Martha Stewart, your home-ec teacher, going back to Mayberry or anything remotely like that. What it does have to do with is creating. Making something from almost nothing. Giving a part of yourself to someone in a knitted gift, rather than something you bought at a chain department store. Shooting hoops just doesn’t accomplish the same thing, nor does wasting your life working. Believe me, I know. I’ve been there, I’ve done that. I also think that part of this “embracing all kinds of do it yourself projects” is a backlash against the over-mechanized, mass produced, computer generated times we live in. Everything is done for us. If we don’t hang on to doing some things ourselves, there will be no traditions with which to reconnect. And those of you who have not learned to cook had better do so before the economy tanks any more and your usual eateries close down. You might starve to death.

If you’re ever in the Phoenix area, look me up. I’d be happy to prepare you a delicious meal, none of which will be from “prepared” food or take out. It will be creatively made probably from a recipe I learned watching the Food Network while knitting. But the skills necessary to prepare it will be the ones passed down from my grandmother and mother, aided a bit by my home ec teacher. Oh, and by the way…since I used to live in that area, I know it’s cold in Charlotte. Would you like a nice knitted hat – not to hide in but to keep your head warm?

Chris Salvatore


Keep on knittin', mama, knittin' those blues away!
Go to Top of Page

kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  11:34:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
Okay, not only did this woman miss the mark, she clearly has issues with any kind of traditional female activity. I plan to disillusion her and her editor with an email telling her that knitting is actually a traditional male activity.

I would encourage everyone to not only mail to her, but also to the editorial editor at the obsever....then it might get published for the rest of Charlotte to see. I will be doing so.

the editorial editor is ewilliams@charlotteobserver.com.

Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  11:34:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
Okay, not only did this woman miss the mark, she clearly has issues with any kind of traditional female activity. I plan to disillusion her and her editor with an email telling her that knitting is actually a traditional male activity.

I would encourage everyone to not only mail to her, but also to the editorial editor at the obsever....then it might get published for the rest of Charlotte to see. I will be doing so.

the editorial editor is ewilliams@charlotteobserver.com.

Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  11:34:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
Okay, not only did this woman miss the mark, she clearly has issues with any kind of traditional female activity. I plan to disillusion her and her editor with an email telling her that knitting is actually a traditional male activity.

I would encourage everyone to not only mail to her, but also to the editorial editor at the obsever....then it might get published for the rest of Charlotte to see. I will be doing so.

the editorial editor is ewilliams@charlotteobserver.com.

Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
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CatherineM
Permanent Resident

USA
3363 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  11:57:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit CatherineM's Homepage Send CatherineM a Private Message
This article is making quite a stir. My first thought is that the key to her attitude about all things domestic is found in the part about how she "barely passed home ec." And still carries a grudge to this day.... It must be very nice to be able to vent all your old rage issues in a newspaper and get paid for it. I hope she feels much better now. I suspect she's getting tons of email, which unfortunately will probably only increase her visibility at the newspaper, get her a raise and a promotion (look at how many people read her, she must be good and deserves more money), and this will only encourage her to shoot from the hip about her personal biases without doing a lick of research on future articles. Gotta love what's become of "journalists." I only buy our local rag when I need to paint, so I have something to put on the floor.



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CatherineM
Permanent Resident

USA
3363 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  11:57:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit CatherineM's Homepage Send CatherineM a Private Message
This article is making quite a stir. My first thought is that the key to her attitude about all things domestic is found in the part about how she "barely passed home ec." And still carries a grudge to this day.... It must be very nice to be able to vent all your old rage issues in a newspaper and get paid for it. I hope she feels much better now. I suspect she's getting tons of email, which unfortunately will probably only increase her visibility at the newspaper, get her a raise and a promotion (look at how many people read her, she must be good and deserves more money), and this will only encourage her to shoot from the hip about her personal biases without doing a lick of research on future articles. Gotta love what's become of "journalists." I only buy our local rag when I need to paint, so I have something to put on the floor.



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Parrot Girl
Permanent Resident

2129 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  12:39:47 PM  Show Profile Send Parrot Girl a Private Message
Everyone's responses are so good! So much more eloquent than mine. Here it is:

"Tonya, you're entitled to your own opinion about knitting, but just because you're not good at it is no reason to condemn it, or people who enjoy it. I'm probably about as far left as you can get and still be a Democrat. My local knitting shop owner wears a button that says "Drop stitches not bombs" and gave me directions to my first peace rally in Kansas City. I've never married, do not have children, am not a lesbian, work full time, and I love knitting. I was forced to take gym in school and hated shooting hoops (and everything else about it). Why do you think I'm brainwashed if I prefer knitting to basketball? Talk about condescending! If I liked it, I would do it. I like knitting, you like shooting hoops. Do you honestly think one is better or more correct than the other?"
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Parrot Girl
Permanent Resident

2129 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  12:39:47 PM  Show Profile Send Parrot Girl a Private Message
Everyone's responses are so good! So much more eloquent than mine. Here it is:

"Tonya, you're entitled to your own opinion about knitting, but just because you're not good at it is no reason to condemn it, or people who enjoy it. I'm probably about as far left as you can get and still be a Democrat. My local knitting shop owner wears a button that says "Drop stitches not bombs" and gave me directions to my first peace rally in Kansas City. I've never married, do not have children, am not a lesbian, work full time, and I love knitting. I was forced to take gym in school and hated shooting hoops (and everything else about it). Why do you think I'm brainwashed if I prefer knitting to basketball? Talk about condescending! If I liked it, I would do it. I like knitting, you like shooting hoops. Do you honestly think one is better or more correct than the other?"
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Parrot Girl
Permanent Resident

2129 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  12:39:47 PM  Show Profile Send Parrot Girl a Private Message
Everyone's responses are so good! So much more eloquent than mine. Here it is:

"Tonya, you're entitled to your own opinion about knitting, but just because you're not good at it is no reason to condemn it, or people who enjoy it. I'm probably about as far left as you can get and still be a Democrat. My local knitting shop owner wears a button that says "Drop stitches not bombs" and gave me directions to my first peace rally in Kansas City. I've never married, do not have children, am not a lesbian, work full time, and I love knitting. I was forced to take gym in school and hated shooting hoops (and everything else about it). Why do you think I'm brainwashed if I prefer knitting to basketball? Talk about condescending! If I liked it, I would do it. I like knitting, you like shooting hoops. Do you honestly think one is better or more correct than the other?"
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  1:14:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
Okay, This really got to me.

I submitted this to the editorial editor.

Dear Editor,

You recently published an article that lambasted knitters for trying to escape from the reality of today's world. I am here to disillusion you, Tanya baby!

You alluded to the work that my sisters did to free women, and give them equal rights. Every day I thank God that these women did what they did, but there is still work to be done. Yes, I have the right to vote and work and I have the freedom to choose a career or family or both. But women still get paid less for the same work that their male co-workers have. You see, the men have families to raise, and the women apparently don't. But, in my household and an increasing number of other households, women bring home the bacon and the man of the house cooks it for the family. If women divorce in this country, most of them can assume that the fathers of their children will not pay child support. Women pay the brunt of sales tax and child care. They are more likely to contract diseases and less likely to get correct diagnosis and treatment. Women are raped every 6 minutes in this country, and our legal system rapes them again in the trials of their attackers. Women go to the brink of poverty to have children in this country, which ranks 118th in the world in terms of services for new mothers and their children including daycare, maternity leave, and other issues. And infant mortality, which is a primarily a women's issue, rose 24% in the last decade in the United States. And in the midst of this chaos that you call equality, you talk about knitting as evidence that equality is slipping away? The nerve.

The textile arts, as we call them, traditionally are male-dominated in almost culture in this world. By textile arts, I mean, sewing, knitting, crocheting, weaving, and spinning. In almost every culture, the men did these tasks and only later did they get passed to women to do through the magic of industrialization. In Peru, the knitters are still primarily men, and it is passed on to the boys at a very young age. In the Fashion industry, the primary designers are men, perhaps you have heard of Yves St.Laurent, Karl Lagerfeld, Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren. You guessed it, all men who sew. Not women nesting or cocooning, by any stretch of the imagination. I should also mention Kaffe Fassett, the premiere knit designer of our times, and yep, he's a guy! Knitting ain't just for girls, honey! The explosion of knitting in the last few years to the girls. So before you condemn an activity as being male or girly, perhaps you should consider whether or not you are part of the solution or part of the problem. Engaging in gender stereotyping by listing knitting as a homemaking June Cleaver/Mayberry Aunt Bea activity makes you definitely part of the problem, my dear.

Even if it were just a girl thing, there are many reasons that women and men knit. The women that I have talked to have many reasons to knit and here are just a few: It's soothing after a busy day at work, I am less likely to yell at my husband for flipping channels, to make something for my friends and families, to keep busy when waiting in line, I like color, I like texture, I like the feel of the yarn, I hate the sweater styles that are out right now, its a challenge, its easy, it's helps me manage depression, anxiety, or OCD without drugs, it keeps my mind off of my problems or keeps me from worrying, it's a way to be creative, I have friends who knit and we meet regularly to sit, knit and chat, it relaxes me in the morning or the evening, it keeps my arthritic hands limber, it helps me feel connected with my grandmother who taught me to knit and has died, I knit for premature babies, soldiers overseas, the merchant marines or other charities. And now that our nation has started an internationally unpopular war, I hear women say that they knit prayers with their yarn for soldiers and families and the families of Iraqi soldiers.

And as for peer pressure, I and the knitters that I know have seen very few needle pushers pushing knitting needles on American street corners, but they will give you syringes with dirty needles filled with illegal substances that promise the oblivion of drugged stupors and AIDS. Despite some knitters who call knitting addictive, anyone can put their knitting needles down, even mid-row to tend to children, go to work, eat, sleep, go to a movie, or any other activity regardless of the gender stereotyping that has been applied to the activity. Lastly, I don't know of anyone who is able to say, my friend introduced me to knitting, and now I can't stop even though I hate it.

So Tanya, the next time you seek to write about something you know nothing about, perhaps you could do some research into the topic, seek interviews with people intimate with the topic and write about that. Perhaps then you won't piss off the 38 million knitters in the country who have something to show for their time at the end of knitting, are actively engaged with families, friends and in their communities and are busy teaching our children to knit for peace.


Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  1:14:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
Okay, This really got to me.

I submitted this to the editorial editor.

Dear Editor,

You recently published an article that lambasted knitters for trying to escape from the reality of today's world. I am here to disillusion you, Tanya baby!

You alluded to the work that my sisters did to free women, and give them equal rights. Every day I thank God that these women did what they did, but there is still work to be done. Yes, I have the right to vote and work and I have the freedom to choose a career or family or both. But women still get paid less for the same work that their male co-workers have. You see, the men have families to raise, and the women apparently don't. But, in my household and an increasing number of other households, women bring home the bacon and the man of the house cooks it for the family. If women divorce in this country, most of them can assume that the fathers of their children will not pay child support. Women pay the brunt of sales tax and child care. They are more likely to contract diseases and less likely to get correct diagnosis and treatment. Women are raped every 6 minutes in this country, and our legal system rapes them again in the trials of their attackers. Women go to the brink of poverty to have children in this country, which ranks 118th in the world in terms of services for new mothers and their children including daycare, maternity leave, and other issues. And infant mortality, which is a primarily a women's issue, rose 24% in the last decade in the United States. And in the midst of this chaos that you call equality, you talk about knitting as evidence that equality is slipping away? The nerve.

The textile arts, as we call them, traditionally are male-dominated in almost culture in this world. By textile arts, I mean, sewing, knitting, crocheting, weaving, and spinning. In almost every culture, the men did these tasks and only later did they get passed to women to do through the magic of industrialization. In Peru, the knitters are still primarily men, and it is passed on to the boys at a very young age. In the Fashion industry, the primary designers are men, perhaps you have heard of Yves St.Laurent, Karl Lagerfeld, Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren. You guessed it, all men who sew. Not women nesting or cocooning, by any stretch of the imagination. I should also mention Kaffe Fassett, the premiere knit designer of our times, and yep, he's a guy! Knitting ain't just for girls, honey! The explosion of knitting in the last few years to the girls. So before you condemn an activity as being male or girly, perhaps you should consider whether or not you are part of the solution or part of the problem. Engaging in gender stereotyping by listing knitting as a homemaking June Cleaver/Mayberry Aunt Bea activity makes you definitely part of the problem, my dear.

Even if it were just a girl thing, there are many reasons that women and men knit. The women that I have talked to have many reasons to knit and here are just a few: It's soothing after a busy day at work, I am less likely to yell at my husband for flipping channels, to make something for my friends and families, to keep busy when waiting in line, I like color, I like texture, I like the feel of the yarn, I hate the sweater styles that are out right now, its a challenge, its easy, it's helps me manage depression, anxiety, or OCD without drugs, it keeps my mind off of my problems or keeps me from worrying, it's a way to be creative, I have friends who knit and we meet regularly to sit, knit and chat, it relaxes me in the morning or the evening, it keeps my arthritic hands limber, it helps me feel connected with my grandmother who taught me to knit and has died, I knit for premature babies, soldiers overseas, the merchant marines or other charities. And now that our nation has started an internationally unpopular war, I hear women say that they knit prayers with their yarn for soldiers and families and the families of Iraqi soldiers.

And as for peer pressure, I and the knitters that I know have seen very few needle pushers pushing knitting needles on American street corners, but they will give you syringes with dirty needles filled with illegal substances that promise the oblivion of drugged stupors and AIDS. Despite some knitters who call knitting addictive, anyone can put their knitting needles down, even mid-row to tend to children, go to work, eat, sleep, go to a movie, or any other activity regardless of the gender stereotyping that has been applied to the activity. Lastly, I don't know of anyone who is able to say, my friend introduced me to knitting, and now I can't stop even though I hate it.

So Tanya, the next time you seek to write about something you know nothing about, perhaps you could do some research into the topic, seek interviews with people intimate with the topic and write about that. Perhaps then you won't piss off the 38 million knitters in the country who have something to show for their time at the end of knitting, are actively engaged with families, friends and in their communities and are busy teaching our children to knit for peace.


Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
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kdcrowley
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USA
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Posted - 03/26/2003 :  1:21:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
Okay, probably a automated response but here it is:

Thanks. We'll be happy to consider your letter for publication.

Regards,

Ed Williams
Editor of the Editorial Pages
The Charlotte Observer
600 S. Tryon St.
P.O. Box 30308
Charlotte, N.C. 28230-0308
Phone 704-358-5012, Fax 704-358-5022
E-mail ewilliams@charlotteobserver.com


Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  1:21:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
Okay, probably a automated response but here it is:

Thanks. We'll be happy to consider your letter for publication.

Regards,

Ed Williams
Editor of the Editorial Pages
The Charlotte Observer
600 S. Tryon St.
P.O. Box 30308
Charlotte, N.C. 28230-0308
Phone 704-358-5012, Fax 704-358-5022
E-mail ewilliams@charlotteobserver.com


Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
Go to Top of Page

kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2003 :  1:21:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message
Okay, probably a automated response but here it is:

Thanks. We'll be happy to consider your letter for publication.

Regards,

Ed Williams
Editor of the Editorial Pages
The Charlotte Observer
600 S. Tryon St.
P.O. Box 30308
Charlotte, N.C. 28230-0308
Phone 704-358-5012, Fax 704-358-5022
E-mail ewilliams@charlotteobserver.com


Kelley

Everywhere you go, there you are! Imagine that....
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