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chris
Permanent Resident

USA
2463 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2006 :  1:41:52 PM  Show Profile Send chris a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by susiknits

Nice article, thanks. I agree that the trend is slowing down, and I view the multitude of new yarn shops opening with a skeptical eye. On the other hand, although others may move on to crochet or beading or whatever, a core group of these new young knitters will stay on.

Those young women and men are the ones who will struggle, learn, enjoy, design, write, and carry on the craft for the next generation. At which time there will be another knitting frenzy, and at which time people will be just as surprised, please and thrilled as we have been these last few years.

-- susi

--That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.



Also, remember that not all who have started knitting in the last 6 years are young! I know at least a dozen women my age (early 50s) who started, or went back to, knitting within the last few years. I was never the target of Stitch 'n' bee-hotch or any of the other trendy books, but the classics and the basics are a large part of my knit library. I will admit to buying a couple I've regretted, mostly bought on line, sight unseen, caught up in the enthusiastic reviews I've read here or at Amazon. I think that once the trendiness goes away, the book market will settle down and produce mostly books that will be classics one day...at least until the next wave of knitting trendiness!

And I have to admit, I'm enjoying the cozy mysteries and Macomber-esque novels. Great eye candy for a quick, enjoyable read. Bring 'em on! We're passing them around the knit group!

As Catherine and others have said, the trendiness dissipating is not a bad thing. There are enough of us around to keep the shops open as long as we have the inspiration and support of others!

hugs,
chris

Keep on knittin', mama, knittin' those blues away!
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abt1950
Permanent Resident

3019 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2006 :  2:06:02 PM  Show Profile Send abt1950 a Private Message
Melinda,

Yeah, my knitting shelves are groaning too & I'm in pattern/project overload. Even when I wasn't actively knitting, I kept buying knitting magazines, so I've got shelves of those. They're still fun & inspirational to look at, even if I wouldn't be caught dead in some of the designs.

As for pattern books, I've bought a few in the last year or so, but I'm becoming more of a fan of books about technique or certain styles of knitting. I want something that will teach me something. Patterns go out of style; reference books last.

Lanea: How about setting up a dating service: SWFHYUK looking for SWMK. Object: swatching, yarn shopping, and maybe more. No smokers or acrylic lovers please.



Anne

Knit long and prosper
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glccafar
Seriously Hooked

825 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2006 :  6:09:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit glccafar's Homepage Send glccafar a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by purlwise


Now my personal knitting book library is overflowing. Maybe other knitters are experiencing the same thing. I have so many projects in mind that I can't keep up. Now I think twice when buying both books and yarn; much more than before. The local libraries are a good resource for books so I check them out before deciding to buy.



I completely agree.
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2006 :  11:34:55 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
When I was learning to knit, this same discussion was going on and I imagine it will be going on long after I am gone. I think the fallacy in the thinking is the fact that they judge it by the "Young, hip" trends in knitting and yes, they fade fast. All fads do. The core group of knitters who love the classics and the technique and basic books just seem to go on and on and frankly I doubt if they will ever fade away.

When I was a little girl, my grandmother had crochetted doilies on every table and also on the arms and backs of all her sofas and chairs. I hated them and although I learned to make them, I never used them in any of my homes. I made them for gifts for those who loved them. Now I am knitting one--for my daughter who loves them. What goes around, comes around.

fran

http://martianmischief.blogspot.com/
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2006 :  11:49:31 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
When I was learning to knit, this same discussion was going on and I imagine it will be going on long after I am gone. I think the fallacy in the thinking is the fact that they judge it by the "Young, hip" trends in knitting and yes, they fade fast. All fads do. The core group of knitters who love the classics and the technique and basic books just seem to go on and on and frankly I doubt if they will ever fade away.

When I was a little girl, my grandmother had crochetted doilies on every table and also on the arms and backs of all her sofas and chairs. I hated them and although I learned to make them, I never used them in any of my homes. I made them for gifts for those who loved them. Now I am knitting one--for my daughter who loves them. What goes around, comes around.

fran

http://martianmischief.blogspot.com/
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Jenny McJ
New Pal

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  12:02:22 AM  Show Profile Send Jenny McJ a Private Message
Just because fewer celebrities are taking up knitting doesn't mean knitting is "on the way out".....the folks who quit knitting do so because they just aren't "true-blue" knitters! Once you're hooked (or needled?), you couldn't stop knitting even if you wanted to!

I need to knit like I need to breathe. Or eat. In fact, I figure if I do less eating, and MORE knitting....I'll be set. The perfect diet--the Knitter's Diet. Give me a helping of Addi Turbo needles & a side of Fisherman's Wool, please. [:00]

As for the availability of knitting books...who needs them??? I love pretty pictures to look at, and I've filled 5 bookshelves with knitting books--but nothing satisfies me more than grabbing my knitting needles, making swatches, taking a few measurements & knitting away--designing as I go!! The best sweaters & "whatnots" are those made with love--not a designer pattern.

Thanks for a GREAT knitting e-letter--Knitter's Review is my favorite email to receive! - Jenny

--Jenny, Mom-o'-Twins & Addicted Knitter
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craftybernie
Gabber Extraordinaire

United Kingdom
398 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  01:17:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit craftybernie's Homepage Send craftybernie a Private Message
Thanks for sharing the article.

Bernie



"You're just jealous because the little voices are talking to me!"

www.craftybernie.blogspot.com (my knitting blog)
www.fairystuff.blogspot.com (my handmade flower fairies)
www.knit1blogtoo.blogspot.com (knitting bloggers webring)
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pamulla@earthlink.net
Chatty Knitter

100 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  03:09:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit pamulla@earthlink.net's Homepage Send pamulla@earthlink.net a Private Message
The article was interesting, but mostly from the bookseller's point of view. I think knitting books may have peaked.
I have been knitting for 30+ years and I have a vast collection of knitting books which I try to pare down occasionally on Ebay. There is not too many new books that tempt me, certainly not the learn-to-knit beginner books.
Like any hobby, those who dabble either move in or move on and we should expect it. It is up to LYS, yarn companies, pattern designers etc to try to retain that interest.
I have also heard that knitting goes in cycles over about 30-40 years but who knows? I am here to stay and I rejoice in the blogoshere, podcasts, internet zines and KR forum. Thank you World Wide Web!

Shape the world, one stitch at a time
Pam in CT www.roddyknit.blogspot.com
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purlnorway
Warming Up

86 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  03:14:30 AM  Show Profile Send purlnorway a Private Message
Very good article, interesting to read and think about. I agree, knitting maybe be experiencing a tiny ebb, but it keeps flowing, and will continue to do so, I believe. But is it really ebbing? The yarn selections at LYSs thrive, evolve & grow, as do knitting groups & classes in many places. The number of knit lit out there is amazing & varied, as is the wealth of online sources for yars, accessories, etc. Are these signs of a dying art again? I personally don't think so. I learned to know about 3 yrs ago, about half way in the new knitting boom. Where I live, in Norway, knitting has a very long tradition and it's wonderful so see that tradition still holds and grows. Being a participant in such an ancient craft as knitting, goes beyond the fiviolity of trends and what's in now--it's connecting with something deeper and creating something with one's own hands that keeps this tradition growing.

http://pinkpurl.typepad.com/
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pumparhugain
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  04:00:34 AM  Show Profile Send pumparhugain a Private Message
Hi
Knitting on the way out in the UK. I don't think so! Last winter students from the university were taking classes in knitting scarves etc using 'eyelash' yarns. The classes were held in the local wool shop.
I think knitting as a craft and a method of stress-busting is back to stay.
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SockFiber
New Pal

3 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  04:08:30 AM  Show Profile Send SockFiber a Private Message
Knitting will go out of fasshion when women do not have to wait for soccer practice to be over, band prctice to be over, teens coming home with the car - you get my drift I am sure. Knitting will always be the major way people express their own creative forces within and give them an item that they can say "I made it myself" [:00]
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weB2cats
Warming Up

USA
61 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  04:36:32 AM  Show Profile  Send weB2cats a Yahoo! Message Send weB2cats a Private Message
This article was apparently written by a non-knitter, stating that knitting began about 6 years ago, men are now knitting and judging by book sales, the popularity of knitting has slowed. these are all false premises. I've been knitting since I was taught by my grandmother when I was 8 years old. And I can assure you that was way more than 6 years ago. Has this author never heard of Kaffe Fassett? Further, gearing publications to the young and basing popularity of knitting on book sales will definitely skew the facts. Those of us who have knit for a few years know most of the basics those books cover and are looking for more adventuresome patterns (Aran knits are my favorite-classics that never go out of style after all that work) or ideas. Maybe instead of gearing publications to "the young", they should be less "daring" and more "sophisticated"
in their designs. I seldom buy books because of instructions. Besides, I can put books on hold at the local library at no cost to me. I would, however, buy a book if it was full of classically elegant sweaters, knit skirts, berets, shawls, scarves and afgans-the best of the best. Who needs more useless books collecting dust on the shelves. And how about a coupon for yarn?
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arnett73
New Pal

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  05:14:12 AM  Show Profile Send arnett73 a Private Message
I agree with the article in that the knitters who are knitting because it is trendy will tend to fall away.

That gives those of us who recognize that it is a time-honored craft and worthy of a second look a greater responsibility to take them to the next level. We must instill in them a sense of our knitting heritage. That we continue a long line of women who knit to keep their men warm on fishing vessels, knit to warm troops as they fought for freedom,knit to support themselves or to bring in extra money for the family, knit together for the warmth of friendship and a small feeling of normalcy while on the trail West, and knit to ease the pain of leaving friends and family.

The demise of the new genre of knitting books that don't begin to scratch the surface of what knitting is about will not be mourned by those of us who know that it is more than just scarves or quick and easy knits. The publishers who understand what it means to explore the deep well of pattern and style that is true knitting (XRX and Interweave to name two) will still be publishing long after the trendy books are forgotten.

So, sisters of the true knitting circle, are you up to the challenge? Will you take a new knitter or two up to the next level?

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nara
Warming Up

55 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  05:16:01 AM  Show Profile Send nara a Private Message
As a knitter who first learned when I was young and hip in the '70's, I believe knitting is a fad - but an enduring one. During those late and post-Vietnam War days, there was a measurable increase in handcrafts; quilting, knitting and crochet in particular. As I look through those old magazines, it was crochet, then, that was geared to the edgy and experimental youthful female.
Marketing, of course, is key in any fad, and when the general zeitgeist has us yearning for simpler times, real or imagined, of course the market will jump on it - and run away when it seems to slow. Then it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy; Book publishers, seeing the market slow, are increasingly reluctant to publish new titles.
If my case is at all typical, I think the ebb and flow of interest in knitting has more to do with the time and energy a particular generation has available for knitting; a whole new group of women was just introduced to knitting. Some will no doubt keep it up, but a large number will get involved with more demanding careers or families. Like bicycle riding, though, many will simply tuck away the skill until their lives allow them the space to pick it up again.
I HOPE they're wise enough to keep all the wonderful books that they've purchased - I wasn't!
(My way-more than two cents worth...)

nara
www.allofapiece.com
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Stitching Fool
Chatty Knitter

196 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  06:06:30 AM  Show Profile Send Stitching Fool a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by fmalone@cinci.rr.com

Knitting will go out of fasshion when women do not have to wait for soccer practice to be over, band prctice to be over, teens coming home with the car - you get my drift I am sure. Knitting will always be the major way people express their own creative forces within and give them an item that they can say "I made it myself" [:00]



I love this post!!! I have projects (smaller ones) that I've only worked on when I'm in the car waiting at the school parking lot, or at guitar and sports practice. When my kids (ages 13 & 11) want to make sure I stay awake to watch an entire movie/show with them, they tell me to "please knit, mom, so you won't fall asleep".

Since I'm not getting any younger, knitting & tv-watching isn't going away for me. Also, I've become pretty addicted to audio books while I knit. I just hope the yarn stores don't suddenly all go bust. The internet's great, but I'm a see, touch, feel person when it comes to shopping, especially for yarn.

happy knitting
Marie
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fiddlestix
Chatty Knitter

100 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  06:15:55 AM  Show Profile Send fiddlestix a Private Message
I do not know whether the article in question has it right or not, but I do wonder what your average LYS owner can glean from it? How are LYS prepared to deal with a slowdown if/when one does occur? What can be done, at that time, to breathe new life into the craft? I, for one, have not taken a class in a while because my LYS keeps repeating the ones I've already taken or am not interested in. Also, I witnessed the owner practically turning away an interested student who wanted to purchase yarn and begin knitting right then. She had made scarves before, but wanted to do something a little different. Had I been the owner, I would have immediately taught her a quick increase stitch and sold her the yarn for a triangular shawl. The store had been empty for hours, and I was the only customer there. ( I had just stopped in to knit on the sofa and didn't "need" anything) I hope things don't slow down, but I do wish my LYS owner would do more to "reach out" and recruit new knitters through more creative marketing of her store. I certainly don't want it to go out of business.
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chrisknits
New Pal

USA
45 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  06:19:20 AM  Show Profile Send chrisknits a Private Message
Just as all fads, the hip, young, trendy knitting will wane. Hopefully books geared to it will fall off too. What gets me is that we allow some entity the power to tell us what is "in", "hip", "new". OK, parts of the population allow them the power. I have always railed against the machine that desires to tell me what colors, styles, and hairdo I must wear each season. I can make my own choices, thank you very much.
It seems just a few months ago I was moaning about the lack of good knitting titles coming out. Then we hit TNNA in Indy and Oh My! I can't wait for some of these titles to come out. But they are definitely not the trend books, they are classics with a bit of fun, but more emphasis on good patterns.
I think the Internet will go a long way in keeping the craft alive. In the past knitting had no support under it, it was all localized. The ones who wanted to keep the tide going had no way to reach out to those outside of it's community. And changes in society and the lifestyles of women also cut into free time and hobbies. Handmade became know as hippie or "homemade". With the present wealth of knowledge and wonderful designs out there, knitting shouldn't have to follow the same story line as before. We can help to make it survive by teaching the younger bunch. Just think of the kids that are drawn to it and want to learn how. Sure, they may not keep it up throughout their lives, but I bet they will come back to it eventually.

Chris
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toomuchglue
New Pal

22 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  06:28:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit toomuchglue's Homepage Send toomuchglue a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by pamulla@earthlink.net

The article was interesting, but mostly from the bookseller's point of view. I think knitting books may have peaked.



I agree - the book industry is a very fickle one, and I wouldn't look to it as a barometer of whether or not knitting in general is on its way out or not.

When anything shows potential consumer demand, there will always be tons of businesses that try to get a piece of that. In the end it will be survival of the fittest - knitting Darwinism, perhaps?

Allison
http://www.supercrafty.com
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msgb
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
531 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  06:38:25 AM  Show Profile Send msgb a Private Message
I feel that Knitting will always be around. I figure like most things or trends it will have its ups and downs but there will always be those who will be knitting. People find other crafts or things that interests them for a time but most of the time they go back to what makes them feel good and gives them comfort.
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Taffy2@hotmail.com
New Pal

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  06:42:00 AM  Show Profile Send Taffy2@hotmail.com a Private Message
I think its the sense of community and accomplishment that keeps people knitting (or crocheting for that matter). I started out crocheting and added knitting to my reportoire to increase my design options with crochet, although now I am just knitting a few projects:) I think in a post 9/11 world people need this sense of community and they need to feel close to their heritage and knitting gives me this sense. MY mother and grandmother taught me when I was a girl, and it wasn't until years later that I pulled everything back out and resumed it..... now I cherish the memories of my grandmother everytime I use her old knitting needles or crochet hooks.
How about the rest of you?????
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