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 Life expectancy lags in the U.S.
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mouse
Permanent Resident

1442 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2011 :  5:33:09 PM  Show Profile Send mouse a Private Message  Reply with Quote
This article has a very brief summary of a recent study: http://healthland.time.com/2011/01/26/life-expectancy-lags-in-the-u-s-but-it-may-be-on-the-upswing/

Very relevant to the health care debate.

........................................................................................................................
What is objectionable, what is dangerous, about extremists is not that they are extreme, but that they are intolerant. The evil is not what they say about their cause, but what they say about their opponents. RFK

Punctuatedknitter
Seriously Hooked

819 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2011 :  6:45:42 PM  Show Profile Send Punctuatedknitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Very interesting. The rise in diabetes and obesity in the US is likely to result in declining life expectancy for those who are in their teens and younger now. Of course these rates are rising in other countries as well, so it may be a world-wide problem or at least common to most developed nations.
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mokey
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15375 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2011 :  8:09:12 PM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It's sad how the U.S. keeps dropping. Diet and lack of natural movement (walking vs. driving, walking hills vs. stair climbers) along with car culture no doubt have an effect, as does the fast food, all-you-can-cram-in-your-face without ever having to get out of your vehicle mentality.

However, the biggest contributor is not getting money where it needs to go within the U.S. medical system. The rich within it keep increasing profits and decreasing services.

The Canadian systems are far from perfect, but not having to check a credit card balance makes a huge difference when seeking medical care.

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Atavistic
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6604 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2011 :  8:22:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Atavistic's Homepage Send Atavistic a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mokey

It's sad how the U.S. keeps dropping. Diet and lack of natural movement (walking vs. driving, walking hills vs. stair climbers) along with car culture no doubt have an effect, as does the fast food, all-you-can-cram-in-your-face without ever having to get out of your vehicle mentality.



Careful throwing those stones, Mokey.

"I'm telling you, we're in a M. Night Shyamalan flick."
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mokey
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15375 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2011 :  10:32:55 AM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yet our life expectancy is still higher, and our obesity rate, while bad, is still lower than in the U.S.

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flicka
Seriously Hooked

877 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2011 :  11:34:31 AM  Show Profile Send flicka a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I will take your word for it, Mokey, since you don't provide any source material. Aside from the Canadian health care system, what useful practices or government programs account for this? Do you have special fitness programs in school, or nutrition counseling? Are all the provinces, including the territories, as healthy as, say, Ontario? Is your Tory government committed to improving the health of all Canadians?

If there is something we can learn from Canada's practices I would like to learn it. If it is anecdotal it may be interesting, but not enlightening.

flicka
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Atavistic
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6604 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2011 :  11:49:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit Atavistic's Homepage Send Atavistic a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mokey

Yet our life expectancy is still higher, and our obesity rate, while bad, is still lower than in the U.S.


And not by much. And it's increasing, as the report I linked to showed. Also, it seems that your rates have seemed so much lower for years because your wonderful government relied on self reports while ours used actual data.

If you're bragging about how great your health care system is, a few percentage points in obesity don't really prove it. Now, if you were South Korean, that would make sense. Lowest obesity rate in the OECD and they have national health care. They also whip Canada's butt, coming in under 4%.

I do like how the report I linked to was all "Canada vs the US. Canada vs the US." It's like a national past time up there, comparing yourselves to us, isn't it?

"I'm telling you, we're in a M. Night Shyamalan flick."
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lella
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9712 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2011 :  2:42:45 PM  Show Profile Send lella a Private Message  Reply with Quote
There is a documentary called "King Corn" that was made because two recently graduated college friends wanted to find out why this was so.

They decided to go to one of the family "home towns" and try to grow one single acre of corn. This journey started after a visit to a DNA lab where they found that corn DNA was at the top of the list of "foods" in DNA samples of their hair. What they found out is that the stuff is in everything we eat, and why it is. Very interesting documentary.

Lella

Zippiknits

Want to make Betty Happy? Help buy her some brand new shoes.
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Wen
Permanent Resident

Australia
3244 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2011 :  12:23:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit Wen's Homepage Send Wen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Our Govt and our schools are taking health care (especially preventitive healthcare) seriously. I received a govt sponsored health assessment this week that was heavily subsidised, an hour with the nurse, blood tests and a normal appt with the doctor $35.00 for the lot. The offer has gone to everyone aged 45-49. Healthy eating was a large component of the visit with the nurse.

Medicare now covers a number of health professionals including alternative health practitioners and it is available to everyone. High income earners do have to pay extra if they don't have private health insurance but for everyone else the premium is 1.5% of taxable income to get full access to public hospitals and heavily subsidised visits to doctors ( out of pocket for a standard consultation is about $18)

School lunch menus are now colour coded, green foods for every day, yellow sometimes foods, and red occasional foods. Fried food, soft drinks (pop/soda) and lollies (candy) are not allowed to be sold in school canteens at all, real vegetarian options have to be available (not just a jam sandwich).
Green foods will include most sandwiches, salads, the hot main meal where offered (low fat, low salt, low sugar), yellow will be things like a muffin or a flavoured milk (due to the sugar content). Fruit juices cannot be sold in containers larger than 200ml and must be predominantly juice not the 30% fruit boxes. These rules are enforced by law and cover all schools whether run by the Govt or private.

PE & health has replaced PE so instead of just learning sports they also learn about food and nutrition.

There are multiple school garden projects on the go, the biggest one led by one of Australia's prominent chefs involves growing vegetables and cooking classes for 9 - 12 yo's. They have the cooking classes before lunch and eat what they have grown for lunch. The recipes are not dumbed down either. Unfortunately our school isn't in this program and doesn't have cooking facilities but we still have the garden.

I saw the Jamie Oliver program last year where he went into the schools in a US town, I was appalled at the food choices available to the kids and the rules that the govt put in place for funding; the lunch must contain vegetables (good) but chips and tomato ketchup count towards the vegetable quota. You must have a cereal but rice doesn't count towards that. There seemed to be a lot of arbitary rules that had no foundation in nutrition. I hope this school wasn't typical of US schools. The young kids couldn't even name basic vegetables.

We still have increasing diabetes and obesity problems like the rest of the western world, take aways and poor choices are too easy. I wonder if there are any schools here that would get similar results if Jamie visited...

Wen


http://www.flickr.com/photos/wen1965/sets/72157623175907664/show/ 2010 FO
http://wenswoolgathering.wordpress.com/ My blog
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mokey
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15375 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2011 :  01:43:58 AM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Good on Australia! We're also slowly waking up to the reality of an ounce of prevention being worth more than a pound of cure.

Schools in Canada do not have to offer any lunch products but in my province, Ontario, legislation will come into effect next school year affecting things like pizza lunch (must be wholewheat, low fat.) Junk food in vending machines has been banned for quite some time, but it doesn't stop kids from getting it off school grounds.

Unfortunately, the school lunches shown on Oliver's show are the norm rather than the exception, as seen in a sample menu from a relative's school:

Available everyday: cereal
MON-Chicken Hip Dipper/Hot Dogs
TUE-Cheese Quesadilla with Mexican Rice/Mini Corn Dogs
WED-Pancake on a Stick and Scrambled Eggs/Chicken Patty
THU-Pizza/Hamburger
FRI-Salisbury Steak and Mashed Potatoes/Chicken Nuggets

I don't exactly know what a chicken hip dipper or pancake on a stick might really be, but I doubt they are what most consider a healthy, workaday lunch.


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Milinda
Permanent Resident

USA
3817 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2011 :  4:14:23 PM  Show Profile Send Milinda a Private Message  Reply with Quote
EWWWWWWWWWW, Mokey, that lunch menu made me want to hurl!

Whenever Husband and I go to the market, I marvel at what others have in their carts. Seriously. We shop the outer aisles, fresh stuff, grains, lean meats. And other carts are loaded with nothing but packaged goods and nothing real or fresh. I actually overheard a woman telling her son that the apples cost too much but she was perfectly willing to spend over $3 on a huge bag of chips.

People I know tell me they don't like to cook because it takes too much time and is hard. WHAT? I mean, if you are an adult and you want to eat junk, knock yourself out. Far be it from me to tell you otherwise. But if you are raising little ones, you are obligated to feed them a healthy diet and teach them the skills to take healthy care of themselves. Period.

Cooking needn't take a huge amount of time and it isn't rocket science. If Husband has learned to do it and do it well and with health in mind, anybody can learn to do such.

M L
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lella
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9712 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2011 :  4:45:16 PM  Show Profile Send lella a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Cooking isn't being taught to generations of Americans. There is a TED talk about this problem and Chef Jamie Oliver, not from the USA but - nonetheless - interested in changing this for our country, gave detailed information about why we as a nation are not eating properly. The talk is astounding.

Here is the link to that talk:

http://www.ted.com/talks/jamie_oliver.html

PS. Sorry Wen, I didn't see your reference to this until now.

Lella

Zippiknits

Want to make Betty Happy? Help buy her some brand new shoes.
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Wen
Permanent Resident

Australia
3244 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2011 :  8:02:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Wen's Homepage Send Wen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The move to healthy school canteens was initiated by some high school kids who were getting nutrition information in the classroom then going to the canteen and not being able to buy much that met the requirements as discussed in class. A campaign to get coke and chips off the premises was started from there. It didn't take long to go national.

There was some resistance with one school reported on the news having to ban parents from bringing lunches at lunch time to stop the KFC/McDonald etc from replacing the school canteen food. Most kids still bring homemade lunches to school and there is no problem with that. Schools do not provide lunch, the majority provide a canteen where lunch can be bought. For little kids it is generally lunch orders (paper bags with the order written on them and the money are placed in an esky and sent to the canteen, at lunchtime the food is sent back, one esky for hot food, the other for cold and the kids eat at picnic tables outside their classrooms.

We appear to have a national obsession with cooking atm, Masterchef and Junior Masterchef were two of the best rating prime time shows on TV last year. We also have a lot of other cooking shows that air in prime time, one of my current favourites is Songs of Sapa, Luke Nguyen's food trip through Vietnam.

Jamie is coming here with his Ministry of Food this year. So for those who don't know how to cook there is something new to get involved in.

Wen


http://www.flickr.com/photos/wen1965/sets/72157623175907664/show/ 2010 FO
http://wenswoolgathering.wordpress.com/ My blog
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mokey
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15375 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2011 :  10:08:39 PM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wen, what do the following mean:

"esky"
"cooking atm"

Also, how big are the school hallways? They must be huge to allow for picnic tables.

Most elementary schools (age 6 to 14) here either have kids eat lunch in the gym, with tables and chairs set up during lunch, or in a designated lunch room. Public ones with a canteen are few and far between, although high schools (age 14 to 18) have them.

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mouse
Permanent Resident

1442 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2011 :  10:54:52 PM  Show Profile Send mouse a Private Message  Reply with Quote
atm---> at the moment

........................................................................................................................
What is objectionable, what is dangerous, about extremists is not that they are extreme, but that they are intolerant. The evil is not what they say about their cause, but what they say about their opponents. RFK
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Wen
Permanent Resident

Australia
3244 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2011 :  01:30:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit Wen's Homepage Send Wen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
esky=chilly bin in kiwi apparently= icebox= insulated cooler. It took some thinking about, its like hoover and kleenex, we don't call them by any other name no matter what brand.

yes atm= at the moment (internet speak sorry)

The picnic tables are outside, under cover. If it is too wet or cold they eat in the classroom. Playtimes and lunchtimes are outside times here. Hats are compulsory, no hat, no play is strictly enforced for half the year to minimise the risk of sunburn/skin cancer. The hat requirement is for all childcare centres, preschools and primary schools (up to age 12). The older kids have to take responsibility for themselves to be sunsmart.



Wen


http://www.flickr.com/photos/wen1965/sets/72157623175907664/show/ 2010 FO
http://wenswoolgathering.wordpress.com/ My blog
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shaggy
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USA
4126 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2011 :  05:52:55 AM  Show Profile Send shaggy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Interesting, keep posting Wen.

shaggy

every dollar makes Betty smile





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mokey
Permanent Resident

15375 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2011 :  11:25:38 AM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I love the idea of eating outdoors! That wouldn't work very well here for a good chunk of the school year due to rain and snow but I will mention it at our next school council meeting.

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Wen
Permanent Resident

Australia
3244 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2011 :  7:03:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Wen's Homepage Send Wen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The biggest loser started here last night with the trainers having to spend a week eating with their families. They are each working a family this time. The food they were eating was horrendous (frankfurts with cream, 1kg (2.2lbs) of steak in one sitting etc). This morning on the radio they were discussing guilty food secrets and a woman rang in saying she drank 4litres of coke per day. They then found out she has takeaway 4 nights a week and is very overweight, the radio person then asked if she had children and if she was worried about teaching them bad habits. Her response was " I have 4...1 of them is not that fat...I just let them eat what they like"

Even with all the campaigns in place here, we still get our fair share of uneducated, blinkered people who don't want to change their behaviour. BTW she does watch Biggest loser but I think a lot of these people watch it with the idea of "at least I'm not that bad".

Wen


http://www.flickr.com/photos/wen1965/sets/72157623175907664/show/ 2010 FO
http://wenswoolgathering.wordpress.com/ My blog
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Consuelo
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
582 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2011 :  2:26:14 PM  Show Profile Send Consuelo a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I dunno... I see 6 or 8 centennarians on the Today show almost every day. How long do we really want to live? Life is SUPPOSED to end at some point. It does for all animals and plants on the planet. We need to get over this mindset of being entitled live forever and with the latest medical advances right up to the time we take our last breath.

We spend $800 BILLION a year on the last month of people's lives. I think that is obscene. For what? An extra four days on the planet? I for one plan to go home to die without any extraordinary measures that extend my life for 25 minutes for a huge cost. It's indecent.

Please excuse the rant but this subject makes my blood boil.

Consuelo
"Travel is fatal to prejudice" Mark Twain
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kkknitter
Seriously Hooked

698 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2011 :  5:40:04 PM  Show Profile Send kkknitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I don't want to have any extraordinary measures to extend my life either, but meanwhile I like to take care of myself and eat food that is good for me. Why sabotage life by excessive eating, drinking and in general launching around doing nothing?

Kristina
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