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robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1236 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2011 :  08:37:09 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Would you pick out stitches or would you frog? I'm working on a sock in size 1 needles, and have just discovered, to my chagrin, that several rows back I mixed up my ribbing. I considered leaving it, but I also seem to have performed an inadvertent yarn over (specialty of mine, being new to knitting)at about the same time, so I'd really like to fix that. What would you do? What would you recommend a newbie do? We're probably talking 5 rows, 110 stitches per row. Thanks for any advice!



Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover

anderknit
Permanent Resident

USA
2594 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2011 :  08:43:36 AM  Show Profile Send anderknit a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I would frog back. But that's me - I'm a process knitter. I knit slowly and I simply enjoy the knitting. Going back and fixing doesn't bother me at all - looking at a mistake does. But there are at least as many others that feel just the opposite. You just have to know yourself.

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
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shaggy
Permanent Resident

USA
4126 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2011 :  09:04:27 AM  Show Profile Send shaggy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Same as Anderknit, the mistake would bother me.

shaggy

every dollar makes Betty smile





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Jane
SustaYning Member

USA
4377 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2011 :  10:19:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit Jane's Homepage Send Jane a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Only five rows? I'd frog them, too.

Jane

Betty deserves everything and more: Make a Donation
Blog: Not Plain Jane
Photos: Flickr Album
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robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1236 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2011 :  11:38:37 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, I definitely want to fix the mistakes, but wasn't sure if I should pick stitches out one by one, since I'm new, or frog, which I'm not that great at. I still find getting stitches back onto the needle difficult, and the loops are so small on this project. Picking the stitches one by one sounds tedious, and would take forever, so I think I'll give the frogging a go. I'll probably learn a lot!

Thanks for your advice, everyone.



Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover
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anderknit
Permanent Resident

USA
2594 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2011 :  2:24:53 PM  Show Profile Send anderknit a Private Message  Reply with Quote
If you are really afraid of frogging, frog back to the round before the one with the mistake, and then pick out the rest of the stitches one by one. A little of this, a little of that.

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
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jtamsn
Permanent Resident

USA
1681 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2011 :  2:37:03 PM  Show Profile Send jtamsn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'd do what you feel most comfortable with. I often do as anderknit suggests: a little of each.
judy
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robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1236 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2011 :  07:55:05 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hmmmm, interesting. Judy and Anderknit, I'll try as you suggest. I'll report back with results! lol. It may take a few days, as I'm currently mad at the sock, and am not speaking to it. I'm speaking to a poncho instead.

Thanks again for the suggestions.
Robin

Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover
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flicka
Seriously Hooked

877 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2011 :  08:58:11 AM  Show Profile Send flicka a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I, too, have a project that is in need of a good frogging. It is a good idea to set it aside, as you have done with your sock. When you come back to it, you will value it enough to want it perfected. And when you are ready to frog, sit in good light (can't stress that enough, especially with size 1 needles) and have at it. When you get to the ultimate row to be frogged, slow down and start threading a nice long circular of appropriate size into the newly released stitches as you go.

When you transfer the stitches back onto your regular needles, check the orientation of each stitch.

When you have frogged as much as I have, you will know the drill!

flicka
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robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1236 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2011 :  06:44:33 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hoooooo-Ray!

I put the sock aside, as Flicka suggested, and practiced frogging on my mother's scarf, because, well, it needed it too. (: It was a looser weave so the stitches didn't want to pop out and unravel as easily as the sock stitches do. Then I turned to the sock. (I'd been giving it longing looks for a few days, so I knew it was time.) I turned on all the lights and sat down... and did it! Didn't drop a stitch. Orientation of stitches was a little wonky, but easily fixed. Now that dratted hole is gone, my ribbing lines up, and I'm two inches further down on my sock than I was before I frogged. Weirdly, a great experience. Very good for the knitting confidence of this new knitter. Thanks for the help and tips, folks. Onwards and downwards....

Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover
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Jane
SustaYning Member

USA
4377 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2011 :  10:09:18 AM  Show Profile  Visit Jane's Homepage Send Jane a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Congratulations! I'm glad it worked out -- and you learned some new skills, to boot!

Jane

Betty deserves everything and more: Make a Donation
Blog: Not Plain Jane
Photos: Flickr Album
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shaggy
Permanent Resident

USA
4126 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2011 :  10:47:57 AM  Show Profile Send shaggy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ah ha, good for you, on to the next challenge.

shaggy

every dollar makes Betty smile





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gema
New Pal

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  12:05:16 AM  Show Profile Send gema a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi there. Congrats on your success - just a fyi - I was doing a sock with twists and lots of tiny stitches when oops, I found an error several rows back. I dropped the stitches down on that column and repicked them up in the correct order. This eliminated frogging and repaired the error. If I remember, it was a twist that was backward, so it stood out to me! The sock looked like it had a run in it which was repaired by reknitting the stitches in the run all the way up to the working row. Hey, it worked!
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susantosca
New Pal

Australia
14 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  01:47:33 AM  Show Profile Send susantosca a Private Message  Reply with Quote
no way would i rip the work back. One stitch five rows back? that's 500 stitches ago!! let it go and move onto the next row. LOL
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sarah montie
New Pal

9 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  05:31:34 AM  Show Profile Send sarah montie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
As a newbie I wouldn't necessarily be making a sock with a pattern on size 1 needles.
To me the important thing is the overall look. Does it affect the appearance?
If you have an YO than it sounds like you have an extra stitch and hole and wouldn't your pattern be off? If the overall appearance is not affected I would live with it. If it only affects one or two stitches I would run those sts down and fix them only and if you don't know how to do that find someone who can do it for you and watch, it is like magic.
If you need to frog and you are loving the sock, frog the rows or tink back if you have to. If you are not loving working on this sock,,move on. You still have another one to knit.
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JillN
Warming Up

62 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  05:46:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit JillN's Homepage Send JillN a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I would DEFINITELY fix the issue, since if you see it now, it will NEVER go away (you'll never be able to ignore it).

However, instead of frogging back several rows, why not use this as a chance to learn something new?

I'd suggest dropping down that one or two stitches to where the problem is, then fixing the problem, and laddering the stitches back up with a Crochet hook.

Here's a YouTube video on how to do this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS2O5ky8C_w

It doesn't bother me to do this anymore, because I got LOTS of practice on my current socks I'm working on. Toe up, I had planned on simple stockinette socks, but once I got to the heel, I realized that the foot was way too large around. So I dropped down 2 stitches, all the way to the toe, and laddered them back up (laddered them back up in Purl instead of knit stitches). This was the start of making the top of the foot have 2X2 ribbing. After I did the first two stitches, I moved over 2 stitches, and did it again. Once I finished doing this for 1 sock, I then did the same for the 2nd sock. So now these simple stockinette socks are 2X2 rib socks on the top of the foot, and the entire leg.

I thought this would be faster than frogging the pair of socks, which may or may not have been true. But I cast on these socks during a Disney trip a couple of years ago, and used to only work on them on vacation, so there were a lot of memories in those stitches, which is why I didn't just frog them and start over.

I've made these socks into my daily travel socks, so keep them in my bag now, and hope to finish them in the near future.

Good luck with fixing this, and I hope you try something new, as this is a VERY easy way to fix those mistaken stitches - once you learn how to do this, then it's just so much easier to fix things instead of frogging them.

Good luck!!
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Alvern
New Pal

USA
18 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  05:52:17 AM  Show Profile Send Alvern a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I see this problem has already been resolved, but adding my two cents I would like to say that anytime I make mistakes, I just go to the line of that stitch, take it down and redo it without taking out all the other rows. It can be done with several also, like a cable you twisted the wrong way.
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Katie 2847
New Pal

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  06:20:39 AM  Show Profile Send Katie 2847 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Here is something you can do if you have to go back several rows: Take a piece of yarn comprable to the size yarn you are using and thread it through a needle. Then take the needle and start picking up the left side of a stitch (looking at a knit stitch which forms a "vee" it would be the left leg). Continue across the needle. When you are at the end remove the needles rip back to the yarn just sewn (this is referred to a lifeline).
Begin picking up the stitches. Once they are all on the needle you are now read to unpick to your mistake. Once corrected, you are ready to go. This method assures you have the correct number of stitches and is much quicker
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Anya
New Pal

15 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  06:40:10 AM  Show Profile Send Anya a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'd go back and fix it. If you don't, that is where you eye will always go first, so one negative will cancel out all the good work you do going forward. And it's not like knitting is painful...enjoy what you're doing--ALL of it!
Anya
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Carol Metzger
New Pal

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  06:57:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carol Metzger's Homepage  Send Carol Metzger a Yahoo! Message Send Carol Metzger a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Good for you. That is what I would have advised, had I been here on time. Because the yarn over added yarn to the row, just running down one cable would not have evened out the stitches; there would still have been extra yarn in that row and it would have been hard to distribute the slack. You done good!

http://cfmdesigns.net/
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robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1236 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2011 :  08:47:01 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks, everyone, for all your ideas. I didn't even think to drop down and fix it, as I don't know how to do that yet, but I've heard of it, and yes, it does sound like magic. Maybe my LYS can show me. They know me now!

Carol, thanks in particular for your confirmation that I made the right choice. If I had dropped down, maybe it wouldn't have taken up the slack. I wouldn't have thought of that--but next time I will!

I've learned so much here, and really, it wasn't that big of a deal after all to frog back and reknit. There was the hole, and the rib bing was off for a good half inch, and I'm finding that mistakes like that really bug me. I can't just move on and ignore them, so I knew that, for me, I had to fix it. So this time I learned to frog better, next time I'll learn to drop down.

Hurray! It's all good.



Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover
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