Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: A new whodunit about a true yarn whisperer
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 Yarn Talk
 Talk about yarns reviewed in Knitter's Review
 Is wool only from sheep?
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

cyn
New Pal

USA
31 Posts

Posted - 04/19/2011 :  1:30:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit cyn's Homepage  Send cyn a Yahoo! Message Send cyn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I thought all animal hair is wool, if not what is angora, alpaca, cashmere....just animal fiber? Sorry, I really couldn't find a spot to ask this question.

robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1247 Posts

Posted - 04/19/2011 :  6:26:34 PM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hmmm, well, I don't know that much about fiber, but angora is actually rabbit, cashmere is goat (combed from the belly of the cashmere goat, no less), I think alpaca is literally from an animal called an alpaca. Mohair is from goats, I think... anybody else? I know there are great fiber experts here who could contribute greatly to this.

Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover
Go to Top of Page

Milinda
Permanent Resident

USA
3817 Posts

Posted - 04/19/2011 :  8:47:11 PM  Show Profile Send Milinda a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Everything you wrote was correct, robinstephanie. And there is camel from a camel, buffalo, quivit, loads of animal fibers.

M L
Go to Top of Page

Kade1301
Permanent Resident

France
1438 Posts

Posted - 04/20/2011 :  06:14:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit Kade1301's Homepage Send Kade1301 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I believe I've read somewhere that in the U.S., legally, you're allowed to designate all animal hair as "wool". Except, as the other animal fibres are more expensive than sheep's wool, they are generally called by their specific name.

In France, most people consider all animal hair to be "laine". Except angora producers, who call the spun yarn "laine (d'angora)" and the raw fibres "poils" (=hair). That's usage, I don't know about the legal definitions.

Happy knitting! Klara

http://www.lahottee.info
Go to Top of Page

robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1247 Posts

Posted - 04/20/2011 :  09:07:08 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I hadn't heard of quiviut, so I googled it. It's musk ox; several websites say it's as soft and warm as, or more so, than cashmere, and it's Mighty Expensive. Looks wonderful. Anybody ever knitted with it?

Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover
Go to Top of Page

Jane
SustaYning Member

USA
4382 Posts

Posted - 04/20/2011 :  1:05:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit Jane's Homepage Send Jane a Private Message  Reply with Quote
KR members have a lot to say about quiviut!. Also, all of Clara's yarn reviews are arranged by fiber content, which makes them a great source for information.

But by far the best resource in my library is The Knitter's Book of Wool. If you don't have a copy yet, you need one! Wild Fibers Magazine is also excellent.

My opinion about the original question is: Wool is the fiber that comes from sheep. Other animal fibers are... other animal fibers. For instance, when I use yak, I don't call it yak wool; I just say yak. :)

Jane

Betty deserves everything and more: Make a Donation
Blog: Not Plain Jane
Photos: Flickr Album
Go to Top of Page

Clara
queen bee

USA
4403 Posts

Posted - 04/20/2011 :  7:11:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The general answers have all been correct - contemporary practice is to call "wool" only that which comes from sheep.

But TECHNICALLY, according to the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939, "The term 'wool' means the fiber from the fleece of the sheep or lamb or hair of the Angora or Cashmere goat (and may include the so-called specialty fibers from the hair of the camel, alpaca, llama, and vicuna) which has never been reclaimed from any woven or felted wool product."

The law has been updated in terms of what can be called "superfine wool" or "cashmere," mainly to protect from unscrupulous people selling something marked "cashmere" that's really just a fine Merino.

But really, in terms of day to day practices, wool = sheep.

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.33 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe