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 A Steek in a triangle?
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rosir
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
442 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2011 :  06:25:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit rosir's Homepage Send rosir a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Here's the pattern in question. It is quite amazing all by itself, but how and why is it knit in the round, then cut? I know what a steek is and how it works for a sweater, or a rectangular shawl, but a triangle?
If I thought it wouldn't take me the better part of 2 years, I might buy the pattern and attempt to knit it. The other thing stopping me is the yarn. I knit one item with Kauni and the only thing I would use it for, is a loofah. So please, all of you most excellent expert knitters, explain how this miracle happens.

Rosi

lella
Permanent Resident

9714 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2011 :  1:07:50 PM  Show Profile Send lella a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Mighty Purdy little thang...

Maybe the miracle happens when you get to avoid all those blasted wee ends to weave in? And a loofah around one's neck sounds just exciting enough to write home about. Gah!

Lella

Zippiknits

"Life is good if you don't weaken." Calvin Coolidge
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Katheroni
Permanent Resident

USA
1407 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2011 :  8:45:20 PM  Show Profile Send Katheroni a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Perhaps as you knit it is shaped like a very broad cone, and when you steek it, the steeked edges become the top edges. Just guessing...
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Katheroni
Permanent Resident

USA
1407 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2011 :  8:51:03 PM  Show Profile Send Katheroni a Private Message  Reply with Quote
No, you know, it looks like it is knitted with the steek ending up as the bottom edges. Not sure, still, of course, but that's what the picture sort of looks like. So you'd still be knitting a cone.
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rosir
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
442 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2011 :  9:05:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit rosir's Homepage Send rosir a Private Message  Reply with Quote
But knit from the top down? I can't wrap my head around it. Hell, I'm gonna have to buy the pattern. Is this an enigma for others, or......... is senility, um, what was I saying.

Rosi
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lella
Permanent Resident

9714 Posts

Posted - 09/18/2011 :  5:36:27 PM  Show Profile Send lella a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hahahaha! Rosir, do you really want to be driven crazy?

If the pattern were a little cheaper, I might "bite". lol

Lella

Zippiknits

"Life is good if you don't weaken." Calvin Coolidge
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Katheroni
Permanent Resident

USA
1407 Posts

Posted - 09/19/2011 :  06:16:29 AM  Show Profile Send Katheroni a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hunh, nope, if it's knit from the top down, then the steeks must become the top edges. If you do buy the pattern, let me know. I'm not one of those people who are whizzes at understanding construction just by looking at something, so if I'm right about this I will buy myself a skein of sock yarn to celebrate!
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rosir
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
442 Posts

Posted - 09/19/2011 :  07:01:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit rosir's Homepage Send rosir a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Lella, you are too funny. Katheroni, just as Lella suspected, i bought the pattern and still don't understand it. I would have to knit it. Am I going to knit it? You have gone far enough, Rosi! Enough is too much!

Rosi, who is a whiz at anagrams and pathetic at tangrams
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socks4all
Permanent Resident

USA
1461 Posts

Posted - 09/19/2011 :  12:16:51 PM  Show Profile Send socks4all a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The purpose of the steek is to allow you to knit around and around without turning the work and purling back with 2 colours. You will always read your pattern from right to left. The steek will be at least 5 sts wide between the end of the previous round and the beginning of the next round. I usually do mine in stripe (for 5 st wide steek I would knit background colour (B), then contrast colour (C), B, C, B). When you are done with the colour work, you will cut up the center of the steek to turn the piece from a cone into a triangle. This is not much different than doing a steek for a pillow top or a cardigan sweater. The difference is that your rows get longer. All the increases will be made OUTSIDE the steek area. The steek might not even be shown in the pattern because it does not effect the pattern nor does the pattern affect the steek.

Alice Starmore discusses steeks in several of her books as do other books that deal with fair isle or norwegian colour knitting.

Although it is scary to take a scissors and cut your knitting, once done it really is empowering. I wish I could be there to hold your hand. Good luck.
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rosir
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
442 Posts

Posted - 09/19/2011 :  3:00:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit rosir's Homepage Send rosir a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks so much for your explanation. You obviously have the steek buttoned up tight. I can visualize the cone, I think. Are your triangle cones knit from the top down? The geometry of this thing has me flummoxed. I suppose the only way for me to understand this is to go ahead and knit it. Perhaps there will be others on Ravelry who will precede me. I would so love to see progress photos of this project.

Oh Bother,

Rosi
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KathyR
Permanent Resident

New Zealand
2969 Posts

Posted - 09/19/2011 :  6:09:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit KathyR's Homepage Send KathyR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Nice shawl! If you look on the Patternfish page you linked to in your original post, click on the right where it says to click for yarn requirements and more images.

If you go back through those images you will come to one where the shawl is wrapped around the model and you have a clear view of the back. You will see the increases right down the centre of the back. As well as that you can see the front corner draped over the shoulder. It clearly shows the closed in steeked edge.

To help you visualise it better take a piece of paper and cut out a triangle shape, similar to the shape of the finished shawl, and cellotape the side edges together to make a cone shape. You would begin knitting from the point and work your way downwards, increasing halfway between the join (steek). When you reach the bottom edge the knitting will be cut along the join (steek) and the edge finished off. The shawl will then be complete in all its beautiful glory!

KathyR

If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got.
My Blog
http://www.flickr.com/groups/kr_members/ (Roselea Fibres)
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rosir
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
442 Posts

Posted - 09/19/2011 :  7:27:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit rosir's Homepage Send rosir a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Kathy, you are a super genius! If you don't teach, you should. I knew there would be someone that could unfold this for me.

Rosi
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KathyR
Permanent Resident

New Zealand
2969 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2011 :  3:08:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit KathyR's Homepage Send KathyR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Glad to be of service!

KathyR

If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got.
My Blog
http://www.flickr.com/groups/kr_members/ (Roselea Fibres)
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achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 09/22/2011 :  08:12:04 AM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message  Reply with Quote
There is a booklet of shawls by the Philosopher's Wool people and many are constructed like this. I saw it at a craft store. I think it's a Leisure Arts publication.
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Gibson Girl
Chatty Knitter

USA
151 Posts

Posted - 09/22/2011 :  3:23:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit Gibson Girl's Homepage Send Gibson Girl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Oh yeah, had this one figured out at once....NOT. Thanks for the explaination. I do think it's good looking but your assessment of the yarn makes me hesitant. Wonder if I could make a swichero? I love color work.
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lella
Permanent Resident

9714 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2011 :  8:12:47 PM  Show Profile Send lella a Private Message  Reply with Quote
That thing is gorgeous. I want to make that.

Lella

Zippiknits

"Life is good if you don't weaken." Calvin Coolidge
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rosir
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
442 Posts

Posted - 09/27/2011 :  04:45:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit rosir's Homepage Send rosir a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I will mount a search for that book. Thanks Achrisvet. Gibson Girl, don't let my snarky remark keep you from trying the yarn. It's good old fashioned yarn and perfect for color work that requires a steek, because it will not unravel easily. No worries about your stitches going anywhere. I wouldn't want it next to my skin, but then this shawl wasn't meant to be worn with a strapless gown, or summer frock. Me and my big mouth.

Rosi
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sandyt
Permanent Resident

USA
3101 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2011 :  2:26:34 PM  Show Profile Send sandyt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
it is easier to knit the colorwork in the round and steek, rather than back and forth, especially if the colorwork is done on the purl side as well.
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