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 Continental or english?
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zknit08
Chatty Knitter

USA
315 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2011 :  5:33:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit zknit08's Homepage Send zknit08 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm learning to knit continental because according to the book that I'm learning from, it is faster and a good technique to use when using two colors. Are you a continental knitter or English or both? Why do you use one technique and not the other?

purlthis
Permanent Resident

USA
2754 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2011 :  5:34:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit purlthis's Homepage Send purlthis a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Continental. I physically cannot knit English.

Rachel
------------------------------------------------------
As I get older, I prefer to knit. Tracey Ullman
http://purledthis.blogspot.com/ UPDATED! WITH PICS!
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zknit08
Chatty Knitter

USA
315 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2011 :  5:51:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit zknit08's Homepage Send zknit08 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for your comment, Rachel. I'm now wondering once I get good at continental knitting if I ever will get back to knitting English. It's really faster, with less hand motion since the yarn is already in front of the knitting needle at all times (don't have to "throw" the yarn over the needle:)

http://time2crochet-n-craft.blogspot.com
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Ceil
Permanent Resident

USA
1803 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2011 :  8:44:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit Ceil's Homepage Send Ceil a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I knit Combination: Continental knit and lazy/Eastern uncrossed/Norwegian purl, which is even faster than continental purl.

Ceil
(Ravelry: ceilr)
Time is never a factor when joy is involved.
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mcmircle
New Pal

USA
48 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2011 :  10:03:41 PM  Show Profile Send mcmircle a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Back in 5th grade, around the time the Beatles were on Ed Sullivan, everyone in my class was learning to knit. They all knit English and I just couldn't get the hang of it.
My mom showed me how to knit continental, the way she learned from her mother, who learned in Romania, and I was off and running.
I've still never learned to knit English. What for <G>?
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halebopp@surewest.net


Posts

Posted - 12/21/2011 :  10:55:10 PM  Show Profile Send halebopp@surewest.net a Private Message  Reply with Quote
English - I can't knit Continental
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Flit
New Pal

6 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  12:02:02 AM  Show Profile Send Flit a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I learned English, taught myself Continental, but now I knit using Andrea Wong's modified Portuguese style (a modified Eastern style) and find it is the best for me especially when doing color work (the threads automatically cross and they do not tangle) and I like it because the purl stitch is so easy to knit and I find my tension more even. I tried the combination Western/Eastern style , but am so accustomed to the Portuguese style now that I find it easier and faster than any other technique. You can see information about the Portuguese style of knitting at www.andreawongknits.com.
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elaine@cro-magnon.com
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  01:58:12 AM  Show Profile Send elaine@cro-magnon.com a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I learned to knit Continental when I took a Fair Isle class and have used it for color work. But English knitting is so comfortable and automatic for me after all these years that I use that the rest of the time even though it isn't as fast. I have really resisted making speed an issue for me when I knit.
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Kade1301
Permanent Resident

France
1438 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:23:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit Kade1301's Homepage Send Kade1301 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I learned Continental and have never seen any reason to switch (I believe knit-purl changes - as for ribbing - are a lot faster in Continental). The closest I come to English is when knitting or purling back backwards.

Happy knitting, Klara

http://www.lahottee.info
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Looyoo
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:26:51 AM  Show Profile Send Looyoo a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ever since I picked up needles continental knitting was intuitive. Now I do both since I learned fair isle knitting. Both come pretty naturally to me now. Happy Knitting!
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sockjoan
Warming Up

Australia
60 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:35:06 AM  Show Profile Send sockjoan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I learnt the English way as a child, but once I'd learnt to spin I needed to increase my knitting speed to keep up with the new hobby, so was delighted when a Swiss lady taught me how to knit Continental, as it doubled my knitting speed. I hold the second thread English-style when doing fair-isle, and for bobbles and entrelac I do the "backwards" knitting as left-handed English knitting.
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scarfitup
Chatty Knitter

192 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:36:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit scarfitup's Homepage Send scarfitup a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My great aunt taught me Continental when I was about 8 years old. For many years, I didn't know any different, not having been exposed to other knitters. Once it's entrenched in muscle memory (and other memories!), it's hard to change, and really, I see no reason to. Happy knitting, however you do it!

Scarf It Up!
http://scarf-it-up.blogspot.com
http://flickr.com/photos/scarfitup
http://scarfitup.etsy.com
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knittenkitten612
New Pal

USA
5 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:38:31 AM  Show Profile Send knittenkitten612 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I knit English, but want to learn Continental. I've tried to learn on my own, but keep getting the stitches twisted. 2011 will be the year I learn. English is comfortable for me, but I'm sure Continental is better for colorwork.
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nit2gether
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:41:08 AM  Show Profile Send nit2gether a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I learned English knitting as a child, but when I returned to knitting and it became an obsession, I developed wrist/arm pain. I taught myself to knit continental, and it is so much more natural for me! Pain disappeared, and yes, I occasionally start a few stitches on a beginning project English-style just to get my rhythm right. But ribbing is much easier and faster when I use continental.

Happy knitting!
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kkknitter
Seriously Hooked

699 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:47:48 AM  Show Profile Send kkknitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I knit continental, but I would not mind trying out other ways of knitting.
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donnawatk
Seriously Hooked

766 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:49:37 AM  Show Profile Send donnawatk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I knit English. I have taken two classes to learn continental. I haven't got the rhythm yet. Donna
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terpsfan
Warming Up

65 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  04:57:52 AM  Show Profile Send terpsfan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The friend who taught me to knit only knew the continental method so that's what I learned 30 years ago. I have since come to realize what a blessing it is. For one thing, it only involves the hands--no shoulder motion whatsoever, which can be an issue when you get older and develop joint problems. (It also makes it easier to knit in a confined space like an airplane.)
Since I'm right handed, this is helps develop some little used brain areas, which is good for the aging brain.
Finally, for doing Fair Isle or stranded knitting, you need to use BOTH methods so you can put one color in each hand.
Bottom line: it's all good!
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pjkite
Permanent Resident

1198 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  05:22:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit pjkite's Homepage  Send pjkite a Yahoo! Message Send pjkite a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Both. I teach, and find it helpful; I also like using both hands for stranded knitting. It doesn't really matter which method you choose, you know; the finished fabric is identical.

Pamela Kite
East Tennessee
http://fiberlife.blogspot.com/

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kmd52@yahoo.com


USA
Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  05:32:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit kmd52@yahoo.com's Homepage Send kmd52@yahoo.com a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Continental! I learned English, but when I opened my yarn shoppe, I decided it was time to learn Continental. I spent the summer working on a garter stitch baby blanket and that is how I reinforced the motion. I was fortunate to learn the Norwegian purl from a Danish friend, as I just could not understand Continental purl. I hardly ever use English anymore. I even use Continental for Fair Isle.
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SpunKnit
New Pal

46 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  05:41:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit SpunKnit's Homepage Send SpunKnit a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I taught myself Continental from an English "how to" book because of previous years of crocheting. I couldn't get the hang of holding the yarn in my right hand, so I adapted. I just figured I was a weird knitter until I learned there were other "weird" knitters like me and the style had a name! I've learned to work English for colorwork, and I knit a left-handed English for backwards knitting. My purl method is unusual, probably not traditional, so it is probably truly called something else, I've never bothered to research what others using the same method might call it. After 30+ years, who cares, it works!

************************
My Ravelry
Inane Knitting Babble
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pmcgrath
New Pal

USA
9 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2011 :  06:01:34 AM  Show Profile Send pmcgrath a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have always been a continental knitter. I learn the technique when was in my teens. After not knitting for a long time, I went back to knitting about 6 years. The instructor I had tried to teach me English knitting, but my continental skills came back with force. So I am diehard continental knitter. The only thing you need to watch out for when knitting continental is lace knitting, the wraps are reversed
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