Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: A true British yarn from Erika Knight
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 Spinner Central
 Spinning Techniques
 Setting twist
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1251 Posts

Posted - 11/18/2013 :  07:31:58 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I recently took a class with Stephanie Gastaud, who taught us how to steam our yarn to set the twist, instead of immersing the skein and letting it dry forever.

Have any of you ever heard of this method? Anybody used it? How do you steam an entire skein, say, 200 yards?

I've been trying it with the handspun I'm currently working with; I hold it over a pot of boiling water, flipping it and turning it at regular intervals and it seems to work, but is ten minutes or more of standing around making sure the steam makes it into all cracks and crevices of the yarn. My brain is already trying to come up with a gadget that will hold it over the steam for me. I suppose a metal swift might work...

I only burnt the yarn once.

Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover

azblueskies
Permanent Resident

2386 Posts

Posted - 11/18/2013 :  12:24:21 PM  Show Profile Send azblueskies a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Living in Arizona has its perks, I guess. I just wash it and hang it outside...dries very quickly. I've only used steam to get the kinks out of yarn I've frogged and I use a small steam press for small amounts. If it's an entire skein, I dunk it.

I made knitting noddies out of PVC pipe...couldn't you wind the yarn on something like that and steam it? I made three different sizes - the largest would keep your hands away from the steam as you turn it and I wouldn't think the pipe would get very hot or at least the heat might not travel up the length as opposed to something made of metal. Really easy to make and extremely cheap!

azblue
------------------------------------------------------------------
Reminder to myself: PROVISIONAL cast on for EVERYTHING except toe-up socks.
Go to Top of Page

purlewe
Permanent Resident

1920 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2013 :  07:35:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit purlewe's Homepage Send purlewe a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have never steamed yarn.. That sounds really amazing. I wonder what it would do to a silk blend!

I have always washed and thwacked. And the thwacking has gotten so much water out that it doesn't take forever to dry. But then I don't live where you do and my humidity might be less.

Life is not a having and a getting, but a being and a becoming. ~Myrna Loy
http://purlewe.typepad.com/
Go to Top of Page

azblueskies
Permanent Resident

2386 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2013 :  12:03:23 PM  Show Profile Send azblueskies a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My favorite part of the process is the thwacking, purlewe. I wonder if you could place the skein in a vegetable steamer inside a pot and steam it that way. Or if you had multiple skeins, maybe in a roaster on top of a rack with an inch or so of water in the bottom. If you had the water nice and hot before you added the skein, it shouldn't take that long. Or wrap it around your head while you take a hot shower and don't get it wet (ha!).

azblue
------------------------------------------------------------------
Reminder to myself: PROVISIONAL cast on for EVERYTHING except toe-up socks.
Go to Top of Page

unclejoey
New Pal

USA
12 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2013 :  12:04:34 PM  Show Profile Send unclejoey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have never steamed yarn, either. I would just skein my yarn, let it soak in a Eucalan bath and then give it a short spin in the washing machine (with the water turned off). It then wouldn't take long to dry.

The PVC pipe idea, though, sounds great!
Go to Top of Page

NastiJ
Permanent Resident

1288 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2013 :  3:22:58 PM  Show Profile Send NastiJ a Private Message  Reply with Quote
a salad spinner can be used to extract excess water

Nancy J.

"Learning how to knit was a snap.It was learning how to stop that nearly destroyed me." Erma Bombeck
Go to Top of Page

Shelia
Permanent Resident

USA
2363 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2013 :  08:36:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit Shelia's Homepage Send Shelia a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The only time I use steam to finish a skein is when I spin singles and want to create a more "balanced" yarn. If singles are steamed when they are freshly spun they will relax and then permanently behave more as if they were a balanced yarn. If more than a couple of hours have passed, though, steaming won't work to do this.

I like to wet finish otherwise. I know that most roving or top isn't really clean, especially after the spinning process. Also, if it was dyed there is often still some excess dye to be rinsed out, and I'd rather do that in the yarn rather than in the finished article. Thwacking is optional, depending on the fiber (angora, alpaca, or mohair, definitely) or the spinning method.

Shelia
www.breezyridgestudio.com
ravelry name - sheliaknits
Go to Top of Page

robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1251 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2013 :  09:27:03 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm also a fan of the thwacking, I can get really into that, but for this particular yarn I've been foregoing it in the interests of not having to wait a week for my yarn to dry, as it's so humid here. Azblue, you have some super ideas here. I really like the idea of the vegetable steamer--with a large colander and large pot of water, I could walk away and just come back to "stir" occasionally.

Shelia, good point about the dirt/dye etc. That's usually a consideration for me, but this roving seemed so clean, and I was in a hurry. It's natural white, so no dyes to worry about, but I do plan to wet block the finished item (blanket). It will be interesting to see how much dirt comes out in the bathtub.

Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover
Go to Top of Page

noallatin
Chatty Knitter

282 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2013 :  11:59:18 AM  Show Profile Send noallatin a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Bed, Bath and Beyond was selling a small steamer for $20 or so. I haven't used it yet since I haven't finished anything I really want to steam block but I can't wait to try it with some freshly spun and plied yarn.
Go to Top of Page

robinstephanie
Permanent Resident

USA
1251 Posts

Posted - 11/22/2013 :  09:44:48 AM  Show Profile Send robinstephanie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Noallatin, it's fun--the yarn kind of squirms a little bit, very subtly, when you put it in the steam. And when you're done, it just hangs there all even. It's kind of amazing. At the retreat, I was able to spin during the morning, take my spun yarn back to my room and run it through the steamer on my portable kettle, and knit with it in the afternoon.

The steamer you mention at BBB--is that a kettle? Or something more particular to knitting or textiles?

Robinsteph

Different is good. ~Matthew Hoover
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.23 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe