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 Dishcloths and facecloths
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Tgz
Chatty Knitter

Portugal
205 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  09:32:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit Tgz's Homepage Send Tgz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi.

I have seen in several blogs people knitting dishcloths and facecloths. Can someone explain me what are they used for (for washing dishes/face, with soap and water, or for drying dishes/face?)?

And what advantages do they have over the alternatives (use a Scotchbrite or Vileda scrub, use a soft towel or a paper-fiber sponge for the face)?

I have never seen anyone use those knitted cloths over here, so I have no idea, really.

Thanks in advance,

TGZ

my knitting blog: http://knittingthrough.blogspot.com
my stash:
http://knittingthroughstash.blogspot.com

RoseByAny
Permanent Resident

USA
12598 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  09:43:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit RoseByAny's Homepage Send RoseByAny a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yes to all your thoughts about what they might be used for.

I prefer them to disposables for environmental reasons - I tend to start them for my face and body, then after a time they get moved to cleaning dishes, then finally to scrubbing the dirtier and hard cleaning.

I encourage my knitting students to make them because it's a great way to try out a new stitch pattern or technique without committing to a whole sweater. And the dishes won't get offended if there are lots of mistakes.

"Choose your friends by their character and your socks by their color. Choosing your socks by their character makes no sense, and choosing your friends by their color is unthinkable."
http://RoseByAny.BlogSpot.Com
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chellethinques
Permanent Resident

USA
1431 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  09:53:30 AM  Show Profile Send chellethinques a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Plus Sugar'n'Cream cotton yarn is cheap, all natural, available at WalMart (i.e. everywhere.) I have been known to forget a knitting project on a trip (*gasp!*) and a dishcloth can be my "I need to knit something, anything" project. :)
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The Irish Ewe
Permanent Resident

USA
1052 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  10:02:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit The Irish Ewe's Homepage Send The Irish Ewe a Private Message  Reply with Quote
So much softer on a baby's skin than a commercially made cloth!

Softer on mom's skin too :)

The Irish Ewe
Norway, Maine
http://www.TheIrishEwe.com
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knitz2
Permanent Resident

USA
1800 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  12:42:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit knitz2's Homepage Send knitz2 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
and if made of linen, the cloth serves as a nice mild exfoliant, leaving your skin even softer.

I've not found anything which will make my glassware sparkle as much as the dishcloth made of "cheap" cotton and it is sturdy enough to scrub pots, pans, & bakeware.
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KnitSSK
Seriously Hooked

USA
656 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  1:13:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit KnitSSK's Homepage Send KnitSSK a Private Message  Reply with Quote
To add on to what knitz2 said, I've read a suggestion that you knit a face cloth of linen, combine it with a great facial bar, and give it as a gift.

Martha

Wanting to be knitting, not working...
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mokey
Permanent Resident

15375 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  1:26:54 PM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The hand knitted ones are far more absorbent, less smelly, can be used for years as they truly do wear like iron. I throw mnine in the hot water wash and hot machine dry.

http://greenfishoutofwater.blogspot.com
www.femiknits.blog-city.com
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lford
Chatty Knitter

USA
143 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  3:56:46 PM  Show Profile Send lford a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I started knitting and crocheting dishcloths to use leftover cotton yarn. They make the best dishcloths ever -- absorbant (after a few washes) and long-lasting. I agree that they are a great project for learning a new stitch or technique. Beginners gain confidence completely a project in a reasonable amount of time resulting in something they can really use. I like to use sport or dk weight as anything heavier can be hard for me to wring out.

Linda
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knits_for_preemies
Permanent Resident

USA
1957 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  6:59:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit knits_for_preemies's Homepage Send knits_for_preemies a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yes, I love knitted dishcloths--last forever and easily repaired if you do snag a hole in one.

As Linda said, they are a great beginner project when you are teaching knitting. The pattern I use includes YO, K2tog, and knit stitches--the other good thing you remind your student is... "It's only a dishcloth--nobody will use it but you, so if you make a mistake or two, no problem." That way they are worry free and end up with something they can actually use for their efforts.

Make great inexpensive gifts too and colors are pretty.

Barbara
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Musicknitter
Chatty Knitter

USA
334 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  7:33:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit Musicknitter's Homepage Send Musicknitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Just curious, but what yarn do y'all like to use for dish/wash clothes?
Never having had a baby, what's the best for baby's skin?

My grandma complained that Sugar n' Cream was too thick and was hard on her hands to wring out (arthritis and old age). I think I used Rowan Handknit DK Cotton and she loved the lighter weight of dish clothes.

-Erin

Visit my blog
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pinecone70
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
393 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  8:15:59 PM  Show Profile Send pinecone70 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I like to try stitch patterns in linen/cotton blend or hemp/cotton, which are lighter than the worsted cotton. The linen blend is great, it dries faster than anything I've ever seen. Blends are really tough too, and stand up to tons of washing so bacteria and other disgusting things don't build up on them as with a sponge. I especially like bigger ones for face cloths. Going to start making them for gifts, too.
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mokey
Permanent Resident

15375 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2006 :  8:52:27 PM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My KRSP sent me some Mandarin Petit which is soft. I've double stranded some which makes it lighter than Sugar & Cream/Handicrafter.

http://greenfishoutofwater.blogspot.com
www.femiknits.blog-city.com
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knits_for_preemies
Permanent Resident

USA
1957 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  03:35:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit knits_for_preemies's Homepage Send knits_for_preemies a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Here are some dishcloth patterns you might want to try:

Round Dishcloth
http://www.mielkesfarm.com/dishclth.htm

Owl Dishcloth
http://knitting.about.com/library/blcloth8.htm

My Own Dishcloth Pattern—Passed down from my husband’s grandmother:


Knitted Dish Cloth

Materials:
100 yds. Worsted weight cotton yarn (such as Peaches ‘n Cream)
Needles: US # 8
Yarn needle for weaving in ends


CO 4 sts
Knit 1 row across.

Begin Increase:
K2, YO, K to end of row.
-Repeat “increase row” until there are 45 stitches on the needle.

Begin Decrease:
K1, K2 tog., YO, K2 tog., K to end of row.
-Repeat “decrease row” until there are 4 stitches remaining on the needle.

Bind off:

Weave in ends.


Hope you enjoy knitting dishcloths. You’ll enjoy using them more.

Barbara
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newknitwit66
Warming Up

78 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  05:32:42 AM  Show Profile Send newknitwit66 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I was so happy to see this post. I knitted up a few this week to try out my new needles DH purchased me. I have Sugar and Cream yarn and Peaches N Cream yarn. I use them as dish clothes. I will have to check in to getting some yarn for face clothes! They are really quick and lots of fun!

Terry

2006: FO's: 29Casted on right now: 3
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Karknit
Seriously Hooked

USA
711 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  06:11:25 AM  Show Profile Send Karknit a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Funny I was going to post the same thing. I would like to knit some of grandmas dishcloths and try to sell at a small craft fair we have in September.

I have no idea what to charge for them. I have seen trendy shops sell them for as much as $20.00 each!!
I thought between $3.00-5.00 would be enough.



I

Karen

My diet incentive, to knit smaller sweaters.
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knits_for_preemies
Permanent Resident

USA
1957 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  06:24:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit knits_for_preemies's Homepage Send knits_for_preemies a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I think the $3-5 range seems fair, considering time, effort, and materials--plus you are providing a finished product for someone who either can't do it themselves or chooses not too.

Our knitting group uses a K3 edge instead of K2 edge and make the same pattern (only bigger) into a baby blanket with soft, cuddly yarn. Then put satin ribbon through the eyelets formed around the edges. Or you could crochet a fancier edge in addition to the ribbon or instead of the ribbon. The blanket is square, and you can choose how big you wish to make it. Great for carrier blankets or preemie hospital blankets. I've seen patterns like this for blankets on the Internet, so if you are interested in this, you may want to search for that.

Barbara

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mokey
Permanent Resident

15375 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  08:30:40 AM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Barbara, that's the pattern right from the ball band of Handicrafter Cotton!

http://greenfishoutofwater.blogspot.com
www.femiknits.blog-city.com
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knitz2
Permanent Resident

USA
1800 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  08:52:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit knitz2's Homepage Send knitz2 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Musicknitter

Just curious, but what yarn do y'all like to use for dish/wash clothes?
Never having had a baby, what's the best for baby's skin?

My grandma complained that Sugar n' Cream was too thick and was hard on her hands to wring out (arthritis and old age). I think I used Rowan Handknit DK Cotton and she loved the lighter weight of dish clothes.

-Erin




If you find the Sugan 'n Cream (or Peaches 'n Cream) too heavy, you might try Omaghi Filati, an Egyptian 100% cotton. at my LYS it is priced at $4.50 for 137 yards so it is more expensive but extremely soft. I've seen it made up as a face cloth and was plenty soft enough to be great for a baby; haven't used it as a dishcloth yet myself so don't know about longevity/washability but the band says machine wash & dry. I've used it for "pilot" projects and just bought some for a scarf so if I have leftovers I'll make as large a cloth as the yarn allows to "wear test" it.
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sandrasingh
Seriously Hooked

USA
740 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  08:54:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit sandrasingh's Homepage Send sandrasingh a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Musicknitter I always recommend Dancing Leaf Farm's Island Cotton. Its 97% cotton w/a 3% touch of rayon for just the right amount of stretch and it's perfect for baby's skin.

Its natural white and can easily be dyed as well.

https://id306.securedata.net/sandrasingh.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?cPath=106&products_id=186

Also this site is really good it has a ton of free dish/face cloth patterns and some really nice ones for lacey designs.

http://www.knittingonthenet.com/cloths.htm

Sandra Singh
www.sandrasingh.com
sandrasingh@sandrasingh.com
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mokey
Permanent Resident

15375 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  10:17:36 AM  Show Profile Send mokey a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Musicknitter, another option I've done is to knit face cloths with Papillon Super 8. It's a Greek cotton that comes in loads of colours and is inexpensive. Not my fave for clothing but it wear well.

http://greenfishoutofwater.blogspot.com
www.femiknits.blog-city.com
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Rho
Permanent Resident

1570 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  11:36:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit Rho's Homepage Send Rho a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I actually just used whatever fairly pretty cotton yarn that my LYS had - never even looked at the name and I do the same pattern as Barbara's grandmother -- everyone loves them and I have had requests passed to me from friends of friends that they need more of them because they love them so much. And considering I started knitting the last week in November and I sent them to her around Christmas I feel pretty happy about that. I also love them when I am doing a large project and just want something that you can start and complete quickly to get that sense of accomplishment. Oh and I call them washcloths and use them as both face/body and dishcloths depending on the color and what room it matches....

rho
http://rhosknittingwoes.blogspot.com/

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