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yogaknitter
New Pal

24 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2007 :  06:51:58 AM  Show Profile Send yogaknitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I hope someone else can relate to this. It seems like most of the time, when I finish knitting something, I end up feeling disappointed. It's not that there's anything wrong with the item or the pattern or anything, it's just that it's never quite as I envision it. I love, LOVE knitting, and I'm always excited about my projects. Then, when I'm all done, I try it on and... I don't know. It's hard to explain, but I feel sort of let down. I'm not sure if I'm too much of a perfectionist or what. Things often just hang funny or curl up funny or just aren't as I thought they would be. Does anyone else feel this way?? I think this is why I usually give my knitted stuff away.

Cheryl

achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2007 :  07:40:31 AM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I only feel that way when something comes out wrong - sleeves too long, doesn't fit, etc. That's discouraging.

Anita
My completed projects

and here

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susan14_23
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
551 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2007 :  08:56:45 AM  Show Profile Send susan14_23 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm sorry to hear that. Have you been knitting long? You mentioned things curling up or not hanging right - perhaps as you gain experience your knitting will improve and you will be happier with it. But sometimes perfectionism can be a problem. You can make something lovely but because of one little flaw you don't enjoy it. One thing I've found helpful with this is what I call "turning it around." I pretend that someone ELSE made the item and then ask myself what I think of it. We're usually harder on ourselves than on others!

Maybe you'd be a good candidate for charity knitting. You can have the joy of knitting and then give your knitted items to someone who had no preconceived ideas of what they should look like and will be grateful for them. I've knit a few things for Afghans for Afghans and you can find other groups by googling "charity knitting".

Blessings to you.

Susan
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kjwajerski
Warming Up

USA
77 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2007 :  09:13:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit kjwajerski's Homepage Send kjwajerski a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I go through the same thing. I think it's separation anxiety. Seriously...it's a part of your life in a big way and when it's done there's a void there.

Kathy W
http://knittingwithmyshoesoff.blogspot.com
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2totangle
Permanent Resident

1212 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2007 :  09:41:24 AM  Show Profile Send 2totangle a Private Message  Reply with Quote
One of the drawbacks of knitting is that you can't try it on before you launch into the project. Also, professionally styled photos can be misleading: the pose may be adjusted to hide problems, and the stylist may even have pinned extra fabric in back to make it hang better.

You may just be a process knitter, in which case you should allow yourself to enjoy the knitting and feel happy giving away the results to people who probably will never notice the things that bother you. If, on the other hand, you really do think you are intended to be more of a project knitter, you might try taking the FOs to an expert knitter (perhaps the LYSO who sold you the yarn?) for advice on fixing what's bothering you. Sometimes a little more blocking or a different edging can fix little things that you're describing. Perhaps you could sit down and evaluate all your past FOs to see if there is a consistent theme to what irks you. Maybe it could be fixed by concentrating on improving your finishing skills, just to pull an example out of the air?

In any case, keep enjoying your knitting. Each project is a learning experience, even for those whose needles have seen a lot of miles.


Suzanne

A few pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/2totangle/
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Kathleen-NYC
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
444 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2007 :  11:09:25 AM  Show Profile Send Kathleen-NYC a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Lots of times I'm not satisfied, but I fix it!

Since I view patterns as suggestions more than instructions, I spend lots of time "tweaking" finished items so they are just so.

I have a vest I knitted over the summer that I've taken out the ribbing around the armhole several times because it didn't feel "right." I'll keep doing it over and over until I'm satisfied. I recently re-knit jacket sleeve cuffs a couple of times until I was happy with them. Never could get them just right so I finally crocheted the cuffs and they looked great!

I enjoy the finishing process(es) as much as I enjoyed making the item.



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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2007 :  2:23:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Does a bear knit in the woods?

Kelley
Check out my solar-dyed yarns at http://www.ceallachdyes.com
and my blog at http://ceallachknits.blogspot.com
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alliwenk
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
373 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2007 :  6:46:34 PM  Show Profile  Visit alliwenk's Homepage Send alliwenk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I've been knitting for quite a while and I think that you learn how to sense when a project is just not going to work. Sometimes it's the pattern, sometimes the wool, etc. I recently started a cardigan, Bristow from knitty, and was not feeling right about it a quarter of the way through the first sleeve so I quit and moved on to something else. I abandon about 15% of projects in the first day or two because they just don't look or feel "right."

The most important factors in a well-fitting knit are gauge, an honest, critical eye, and enough experience to know when your knitting is off.

And I totally agree with Kathy W. After a particularly fun or challenging project is done I feel depressed that I don't have it to work on anymore and it's sometimes hard to move on and get started on a new project.

Allison
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marjotse
Permanent Resident

Sweden
1018 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2007 :  03:09:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit marjotse's Homepage Send marjotse a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I think it would almost be not human not to be dissappointed sometimes!
But there are certain things that help. I really found I was a lot less dissappointed when I started to finish my knitting in a neat and "professional" way. Buy a good finishing book since it is really a worthwhile thing.
Also I know for myself what works for me and what not but I guess that is Alliwenk also says. About month ago I ripped finally a 75% knitted cardigan for my husband. I just was not happy and it was just hibernating in a basket and I couldn't pick it up and finish it. So I ripped and started a new cardigan from another pattern. This time it works between the yarn, the pattern and me and I am happily knitting on

Marjolein

my photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/98299499@N00/
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Atavistic
Permanent Resident

6604 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2007 :  03:38:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit Atavistic's Homepage Send Atavistic a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yes.

Amanda Takes Off... and Amanda Knits

Hand and foot when harmonized forms martialism/but Military and literary when harmonized is art and this brings/philosophy. (Lee, Chang Hoo)
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go get your smock
Chatty Knitter

328 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2007 :  09:19:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit go get your smock's Homepage Send go get your smock a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I often felt this same way back in the day when I'd sew my own clothing. The Simplicity drawing looked so aluring, and the actual garment was boxy and weird. And then I'd alter the pattern and refit it, and then, well, shoot! I just gave up on commercial patterns and made my own.

I mostly knit accessories now to avoid that disappointment and frustration. I suppose I am just not persevering enough these days to rework a knitted garment until it fits really well. Maybe that will change someday! I am still looking for that perfect pattern for a knitted jacket, and might just have to work it up myself.

So, I'd have to say you are certainly not alone and likely in the majority!

Diane in Chicago

Felted Handbag Workshop
Home of the Little Coco Bag
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Jints
Chatty Knitter

176 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2007 :  12:39:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm the Same. Made Garments are frequently a disappointment. used to sew, love it, but garments made were never pleasing. Knit ones slightly better odds but still high disappointment rate. & i've been knitting 40 years. but at least knit ones can be re-worked if necessary.
Consequently i do lots of accessories like 'smock' said. Afghans are great, large and always a satisfying result, you don't have to worry about getting the wrong size or fit and they are useful. also good for using up yarn from that disappointing jumper you never wear. (there are only limited 'round home' sweaters one needs)



Happy Knitting.
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abt1950
Permanent Resident

3019 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2007 :  6:12:01 PM  Show Profile Send abt1950 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Not liking at least some of what you knit is par for the course for most knitters. Sometimes there's nothing rationally wrong with the FO except that you don't immediately look 10 pounds thinner, 3 inches taller, and give off a golden aura. Other times it's because the yarn wasn't right, the pattern didn't suit you, the fit is just a little off., or something else just doesn't work. It happens to all of us. The trick is figuring out what kinds of projects will suit you when they become finished objects. I'm still working on that one myself. In fact, I keep an oversized eyesore (um, I mean sweater) in pinkish purplish 1980s eyelash yarn as a reminder.

Anne in NJ

Knit long and prosper
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azknitter
Honorary Angel

5539 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2007 :  7:29:32 PM  Show Profile Send azknitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Absolutely!

The thing with me is, I know before I get to the end of a project that I'm not going to like it, so...I probably frog 15 projects for each completely finished project.

I decided a long time ago that the key for me is to not compare my own knitting to anyone else's. Once I let go of the need to get it perfect the first time, my numbers of (happily) finished objects increased dramatically.

Trish
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Milinda
Permanent Resident

USA
3817 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2007 :  7:36:18 PM  Show Profile Send Milinda a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Just call me Tinker Belle. I do much the same thing Trish does, frog, frog and FROG. I've knit for over forty years and it seems I have a mix of emotions regarding my knitting.

Sometimes a project takes so long, I feel as if I've worn it already and I'm tired of it. Sometimes things have to sit in the back of my closet till I fall in love with them again.

I'm very much a process knitter, too. I can enjoy the knitting and then feel nothing for it when I'm finished.

I think your feelings are very normal.

M L
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monnibo
Chatty Knitter

Canada
161 Posts

Posted - 09/22/2007 :  4:44:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit monnibo's Homepage Send monnibo a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Milinda


Sometimes a project takes so long, I feel as if I've worn it already and I'm tired of it. Sometimes things have to sit in the back of my closet till I fall in love with them again.



I do this ALL the time!! I almost finished a scarf for my boyfriend, and then I didn't like the yarn, so I switched yarns, but I've barely started because I'm tired of the stitch already.

- Monica

-----------------------------------
my blog: http://monnibo.wordpress.com
crafty creations: http://crafty.mcmiller.ca


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yogaknitter
New Pal

24 Posts

Posted - 09/23/2007 :  07:05:53 AM  Show Profile Send yogaknitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks, everyone, for your suggestions and reassurances! I appreciate all of your comments. No, I'm not a brand new knitter. Sometimes it does seem that I've chosen the wrong yarn or something, and I AM somewhat of a perfectionist. I, too, have found the most successful projects to be things like socks and mittens, etc. At least those are the ones I feel best about!

Friends and family do seem to appreciate my knitted items, and I do knit for charity, so I suppose I will just continue. Maybe I am a process knitter. I don't mean to sound all gloom and doom!! I really love knitting, enjoy choosing and planning my projects, am involved in online and local knitting communities. I was just wondering if anyone else felt this same sort of let-down when a project is finished. Thanks for all the support.
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jwaid97
Chatty Knitter

135 Posts

Posted - 09/23/2007 :  07:06:49 AM  Show Profile  Visit jwaid97's Homepage Send jwaid97 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am definitely a process knitter and most of the time give away the stuff that I knit. However, I've attempted several sweaters for myself that just didn't feel right once I got the body done. Everything can be perfect as stated in the pattern and match up perfectly with my measurements and sometimes I still don't like it. I just frog and see it as a learning experience. It drives my fiance crazy because he sees all of the work I put into something and then it's just a pile of string. Now I mostly do accessories, afghans, and shawls because they always look good. I do have one finished sweater that I loved making and fits perfectly but I've only actually worn it twice. I can cover up with the same afghan every day if I want or carry bag for weeks at at time. I just had to figure out which items I enjoy making and using. Now I am a much happier knitter.

Joanna
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yogaknitter
New Pal

24 Posts

Posted - 09/23/2007 :  07:07:02 AM  Show Profile Send yogaknitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks, everyone, for your suggestions and reassurances! I appreciate all of your comments. No, I'm not a brand new knitter. Sometimes it does seem that I've chosen the wrong yarn or something, and I AM somewhat of a perfectionist. I, too, have found the most successful projects to be things like socks and mittens, etc. At least those are the ones I feel best about!

Friends and family do seem to appreciate my knitted items, and I do knit for charity, so I suppose I will just continue. Maybe I am a process knitter. I don't mean to sound all gloom and doom!! I really love knitting, enjoy choosing and planning my projects, am involved in online and local knitting communities. I was just wondering if anyone else felt this same sort of let-down when a project is finished. Thanks for all the support.
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llinn
honorary angel

USA
1650 Posts

Posted - 09/23/2007 :  2:34:02 PM  Show Profile Send llinn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm getting old (like seriously, now) and have been doing this long enough to have a better idea of how things will work. So no, it almost never happens that a finished thing disappoints me. Now ask me how many different times I've started the same hat at how many different gauges and stitches. Getting there can be a little more complicated.

But, being truly anal about finishing and appearance, I'm almost always pleased with the end result--be it knit or sewn. Course I have a dirty little secret to share on this one. My rather much younger sister ( 6 1/2 years and boy does she grind that in) is also a sewer. She tends to mostly produce quilts rather than clothes. A few years back she was in the car with Ma on their way back to Mom's house with my #2 son. He was blissfully showing his aunt the infinitely cool cargo pants and fancy stitched tshirt his mother had made him. Ma was also wearing an outfit I had made for her. My sister looks around with that sorta trapped look and says "listen, tell me, does it ever happen that when your mother makes clothes for you or anybody that they don't fit when they're done. You know, maybe they'll fit somebody but not the person she planned for them." Nathaniel looks at his aunt and with high dudgeon declaims, in defense of his mother,"no, when Mom makes something it fits the person she made it for perfectly." My sister looked at my mother and said "She always was a bi*ch"

Poimnt, game and set to me, I believe.

Llinn

P>S> Now you do have to remember that the standard fit for an adolescent male, at that time, was approximately 20 inches of ease in every direction. Nathaniel said they fit perfectly, but they would also have fit sasquatch.

It did feel good to get one over on the baby, though. You remember the little beast you always had to watch. Not allowed to drown in the river. Had to go everywhere you went when she was 6. Always so innocent.
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Mocha
Permanent Resident

Singapore
2903 Posts

Posted - 09/24/2007 :  09:20:16 AM  Show Profile Send Mocha a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Disapointed at my first attempt of my own sweater... yes..
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