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 Dyeing Discussion
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 Less is more? Or isn't it?
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Kade1301
Permanent Resident

France
1438 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2007 :  08:24:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit Kade1301's Homepage Send Kade1301 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi all,

After looking at the colour samples in "Color in Spinning" and at the sweaters in "The Twisted Sisters Knit Sweaters" I wonder whether I'm the only person who thinks that there are too many colours in both of them? There's precious few pictures in either book of colours that I would like to wear and really, why go to all that trouble if I don't like the result?

Personally, I try to stick to either mixing just two different primary colours in the pot (yellow at one side, blue at the other etc.) or by carding. Or I gather up all the locks I have that are some shade of blue and card them together to create a heathery mix. Or, third alternative which I've discovered a few days ago when I was running out of coloured wool: 3 fourths of white wool carded with 1 fourth of deeply coloured wool gives a wonderful delicate heathery pastel colour. I suppose mixing colour with black or brown wool would give just as beautiful results.

But I absolutely don't see the point of mixing together dark blue, light blue, red, pink, purple, yellow and green all in one carded batt... Or one sweater... I mean, there probably are artists out there who manage to create beautiful things by doing just that (I haven't seen any of Fassett's books yet) but Menz's skeins (in the gallery in the back there are some nice items) and the Twisted Sisters' sweaters just don't inspire me.

What do you think? Klara

http://www.lahottee.info

fiberlicious
Permanent Resident

1637 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2007 :  2:42:39 PM  Show Profile Send fiberlicious a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It's all really a matter of individual taste. I love a bunch of raucous color. A friend's idea of "raucous color" is three different shades of brown.

Do what makes you happy, and leave the riot of color for rest of us!
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2007 :  5:02:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message  Reply with Quote
What Fiberlicious said.

Also, you are doing the things in Deb's book, but you have simply found the color schemes that please you. These would be either analogous schemes or where you tint the color (add white).

The biggest thing that Deb does is demonstrate that you can arrive at the colors that you like in different ways, either through dyeing, carding, combing or some combination of those things.

You don't have to have yarn with every color in it, but the idea is that you know what it will do and what you like.

Besides more for me. LOL

Kelley
Check out my solar-dyed yarns at http://www.ceallachdyes.com
and my blog at http://ceallachknits.blogspot.com
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2007 :  5:03:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message  Reply with Quote
What Fiberlicious said.

Also, you are doing the things in Deb's book, but you have simply found the color schemes that please you. These would be either analogous schemes or where you tint the color (add white).

The biggest thing that Deb does is demonstrate that you can arrive at the colors that you like in different ways, either through dyeing, carding, combing or some combination of those things.

You don't have to have yarn with every color in it, but the idea is that you know what it will do and what you like.

Besides more for me. LOL

Kelley
Check out my solar-dyed yarns at http://www.ceallachdyes.com
and my blog at http://ceallachknits.blogspot.com
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KS
Seriously Hooked

862 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2007 :  6:14:22 PM  Show Profile Send KS a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yes, I agree that sometimes less is more. I haven't seen the latest of Kaffe Fassett's offerings, but what was around years ago has so many colors in it that it looks brown. Eventually, if you add too many colors, you get browon. Mud.

I think we all go in phases. Sock yarns are a grand example. I've knitted a whole lot of self patterning sock yarns. When I did it, I thought they were cool. I've tired of it now. I moved on to handpainted yarns. I'm not sure where I am on them. Probably nearing the end.

Why?

Many of them look better in the hank than they do in a sock. The ones that look good as a stocking stitch sock only look good that way. I have probably 40% of each hank I bought left. I've found it difficult to use it with something else because it was planned as a stand alone hank of yarn.

That's one thing that's good about Deb Menz's book. She talks about using your yarn as part of a project. Her book made me realize what it was that I didn't like about the handpainted yarns I don't like. That makes my opinion of her projects irrelevent in my mind. That finding alone is worth the price of the book.

KS
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Kade1301
Permanent Resident

France
1438 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2007 :  10:51:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit Kade1301's Homepage Send Kade1301 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
No need to defend Menz's book - I wasn't critizing it (or the Twistes Sisters one). I simply wanted to find out whether there are many people out there who actually LIKE so many colours mixed together - because if there are, maybe I should knit in more colours when I'm knitting for selling!

Klara

http://www.lahottee.info
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KathyR
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New Zealand
2969 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2007 :  4:05:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit KathyR's Homepage Send KathyR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yes, I agree, sometimes less is more! But, also, I often like the more complex mixes as well. The extra colours often provide a greater depth and interest to the yarn/fibre - as long as they don't overwhelm or muddy.

KathyR
Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
My Blog
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kdcrowley
Permanent Resident

USA
4773 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2007 :  5:27:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit kdcrowley's Homepage Send kdcrowley a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am noticing that I like the look of heathered yarn, I want a yarn that is complex in structure or fiber or color.....but complex does not necessarily mean garish or bright.

Kelley
Check out my solar-dyed yarns at http://www.ceallachdyes.com
and my blog at http://ceallachknits.blogspot.com
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Valk_scot
Permanent Resident

United Kingdom
1281 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2007 :  09:21:15 AM  Show Profile Send Valk_scot a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I love colour, the more the better. No, I don't wear it, but I love to look. Some of the most extraordinary combinations of colour work the best...and thats what Fassett does best, adding one or two or more extra colours to make a pedestrian combination "sing". It takes a colour genius like Fassett to choose these accent colours though!

And as I get older, I'm getting more adventurous about colours. &&^%$ to accepted "tasteful"...I'm regressing to my childhood spent in India, where shocking pinks and lime greens were regarded as normal, everyday, classic colours, lol.

Val.


http://spinningfishwife.blogspot.com/
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Lanea
Permanent Resident

USA
5190 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2007 :  11:21:17 AM  Show Profile  Visit Lanea's Homepage Send Lanea a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I also lean towards heathers, tweeds, colorways made up of tones in one section of the spectrum, and semi-solids. I love the depth of color a hand-dyed or hand-painted yarn can give me, but agree that a lot of handpaints look better in the skein than they do knit up.

I think one of the reasons broader spectra are used in the books on dyeing is that they're easier to get across in a photograph. It's very difficult to capture the variations in a semi-solid or a yarn dyed in a few colors near each other in the spectrum on film sometimes.

See proof of insanity: http://crazylanea.typepad.com/
Join the KR Webring: http://crazylanea.typepad.com/fiberarts/2006/07/the_knitters_re.html
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