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argioia
New Pal

6 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2008 :  10:43:50 AM  Show Profile Send argioia a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am knitting a skirt in a cotton/linen blend yarn. After joining the first skein, i wove the yarn into the wrong side of the fabric as usual, but I was not pleased with the resulting right side of the fabric. I could tell the ends were woven in. Subsequently, when starting the third skein, I tied a loose knot on the wrong side, and it is not noticeable at all on the front. I feel like I am breaking the cardinal rule of knitting by tying a knot. Has anyone else had such issues? Will I go to knitters hell by breaking this commandment?

knittingrunner
Seriously Hooked

USA
809 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2008 :  11:46:28 AM  Show Profile Send knittingrunner a Private Message  Reply with Quote
If you can live with it, so can I. I say that as a serious no knots kind of girl. Knit on!

Traveling while knitting...and running!
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txknitr
Warming Up

USA
80 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2008 :  1:03:27 PM  Show Profile Send txknitr a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am definately a knoter. I just don't trust weaving in the ends and sometimes they do look bad. I say whatever works for you. Those that don't like it, won't see or wear it.
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schrafinator
Chatty Knitter

332 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2008 :  4:10:20 PM  Show Profile Send schrafinator a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I tie knots all the time, if it will look better or be more secure than weaving. In particular, I tie knots in kid's clothing and afghans since they see a lot of washing and rough treatment.

Don't sweat it. Remember, there are NO knitting police to arrest you! It is YOUR knitting to construct as YOU please.

:)
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Clara
queen bee

USA
4404 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2008 :  5:44:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
No knitter's hell for knots! But we do have a policy about duplicate posts, so I've locked the other identical post you made to this in the Introduce Yourself section. Can't wait to see pictures of the finished skirt!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
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argioia
New Pal

6 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2008 :  07:49:11 AM  Show Profile Send argioia a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Oops...sorry. They don't call ne a newbie for nothin!
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nlnitter
Chatty Knitter

166 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2008 :  07:55:04 AM  Show Profile Send nlnitter a Private Message  Reply with Quote
argioia, my theory is to trust your instincts on things like this. Nothing's written in stone. If a knot seems like the right way to go, then it probably is.

Welcome to KR!
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queen of the east
Seriously Hooked

Canada
877 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2008 :  08:44:50 AM  Show Profile Send queen of the east a Private Message  Reply with Quote
In answer to your question, yes, you will go to knitters hell. Not only that, your punishment while you are there will be to untangle an enormous horribly tangled skein of lace weight silk yarn.
I usually try to avoid knots if at all possible. If the garment is knit with a separate front and back I join the yarn at the edge and work the join into the seam. If not, oh well.

Ann in Montreal
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Marie
Chatty Knitter

347 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2008 :  4:48:52 PM  Show Profile Send Marie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by queen of the east

In answer to your question, yes, you will go to knitters hell. Not only that, your punishment while you are there will be to untangle an enormous horribly tangled skein of lace weight silk yarn.
Ann in Montreal



Actually, untangling an enormous skein of lace weight silk is not only something I find enjoyable and relaxing, but it is something I did when I inherited my friend's mom's knitting basket. How weird is that? Probably shouldn't be admitting it in public, but at least it's among friends who understand.
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knittingrunner
Seriously Hooked

USA
809 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2008 :  5:46:12 PM  Show Profile Send knittingrunner a Private Message  Reply with Quote
One knitter's hell is another's knitting basket?!
Marie, it seems to me there was a thread a while back about whether you were an untangler or a snipper when it came to knots, guess we know where you stand!
Back to the regularly scheduled programming now.

Traveling while knitting...and running!
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Marie
Chatty Knitter

347 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  04:37:03 AM  Show Profile Send Marie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A snipper!? (gasp) That never even occurred to me. I have to go find that thread--I am sure it was entertaining and possibly revealing?
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Grand-moogi
Seriously Hooked

Australia
783 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  04:59:20 AM  Show Profile Send Grand-moogi a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have always been a knotter - call me a nutty knotter if you like but I believe it is far superior to weaving in which can and does unravel. I do it at the end of a row if possible but sometimes that can waste a lot of yarn. What I do is this:
When I come toward the end of the ball, I start the next one and tie a loose knot to hold them together. Then I go back after I have finished the garment and check the knots. This gives you the chance to adjust the tension at the join so it is even either side of the knot. I don't tie a granny knot either, I tie a reef knot (left over right and then right over left) Then I use my big darning needle to weave the ends in so you cannot see bits of yarn hanging out at the back of my work. I take a great pride in the neatness of the backs of my work (I was going to say in my backside that doesn't sound too good) and in the security of what I knit. I would hate to think that something I knitted would come undone in a hurry. It's like I don't like to use cheap wool either. I want the things I knit to last and hold their shape. No point in putting all that work into something that is not going to last.
Well that's my tuppence worth.
Welcome to the forums. I have been knitting for over fifty years and have learnt a great deal from the people who contribute to this forum.

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scarfitup
Chatty Knitter

192 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  05:31:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit scarfitup's Homepage Send scarfitup a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am a knotter! So much so, in fact, that I have developed designs in which the knots intentionally hang OUT, and they have proven very popular. One is a scarf - I call it the Hobo - it's a bias scarf with multiple fibers combined, knitted, and knotted together. The other is my line of Sac Sauvage Bags (Wild Things!). Examples of both can be seen at the websites listed below.

When I have to tie up the loose ends (so to speak) on a project, I usually use a crochet hook to weave them in along an edge or along a ridge of knitting on the wrong side. That seems to work for me!

Scarf It Up!
http://scarf-it-up.blogspot.com
http://scarfitup.etsy.com
http://flickr.com/photos/scarfitup
http://portcitypottery.com

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peggymchoe
Warming Up

63 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  05:45:22 AM  Show Profile Send peggymchoe a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thank you for starting this topic. I've always dutifully woven in my ends and they generally look like crap and then start to come loose. This is one knitting skill that doesn't seem to improve (probably because I avoid having to weave in ends), so I'm glad I can now give myself permission to knot!
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stherio
New Pal

USA
48 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  05:56:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit stherio's Homepage Send stherio a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I don't knot or weave. When I get to the end of a row, I drop the spent yarn and start the next row with the new yarn. I make sure to sew the tails into the seam. Knitting in the round? That's a different story. Depends on the garment and the place in it whether I knot or not. But, I prefer to knot.....


Suzy
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lucienh
Honorary Angel

919 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  06:03:05 AM  Show Profile Send lucienh a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I love the thought of weaving, or russian joins or whatever, but I don't trust my skills, so I knot and then try to weave the ends in. And if the knot sneaks to the front, it's a design element.

New blog, not about knitting, but I bet it keeps sneaking in: http://greenbananascancerblog.blogspot.com/
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Fufina514
New Pal

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  06:23:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit Fufina514's Homepage Send Fufina514 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Depends on the project. Some projects there is no way weaving the ends in would stay so I knot. Other projects I weave and then knot. Somehow I do not think the Knitting Gods are going to strike me down for knotting any loose ends.
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emjayknits@yahoo.com
New Pal

3 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  06:40:50 AM  Show Profile Send emjayknits@yahoo.com a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thank you for posting this. I've always hated weaving in ends for many of the reasons listed above. When I have knotted, I've always done it in secret and never ever showed it to anyone. And, felt extremely guilty. Now that I see that others do it and have learned good ways to make it better, I'm going to happily knot away - IN PUBLIC!
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momtat@comcast.net
New Pal

USA
19 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  06:45:07 AM  Show Profile  Send momtat@comcast.net a Yahoo! Message Send momtat@comcast.net a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, here's my 2 cents on the topic......
I used to be a knotter, but I have sensitive skin and sometimes, I find the knot to be a bit irritating. Also, I have been knitting a lot of lace and other things with skinny yarn and knots tend to show with delicate yarns, so I've had to experiment with other techniques.

1. What I call the Split and spit: on Wool and other animal fibers that felt, you can split the plys on each of the yarn ends, overlap the individual plys by about 1" each, then wet each individual overlapped ply with your spit, really wet, and rub between your palms. Then, put them all back together, re-wet and rub again to felt the fibers together into 1 continuous strand of yarn.

2. There's the Russian Join, which you can google for instructions, that works very well and leaves no ends to weave in.

3. When you're near the end of the yarn, pick up the new yarn end and knit a few stitches with both old and new yarn, then drop the old yarn and continue on with the new skein, just be careful on the return row to not split these into 2 stitches. You won't even notice the extra " bulk" in your knitting. Then weave in the ends when you're done.

All of these help reduce the need for a big knot sticking out of the back of your work. It just makes for a more finished looking piece.
And helps with less irritation for those of us with impossibly sensitive skin.

Truth
SW Pa
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chrisknits
New Pal

USA
45 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  07:05:36 AM  Show Profile Send chrisknits a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am not a knotter and never will be. I feel knots are the easy way to finish and can end up being seen. Knots work there way to the front of your work. I know because of a store bought sweater I had that had Intarsia which was knotted. Every time I washed and wore the sweater the knots would work to the front. Of course, YMMV.

I usually spit splice to join, but when I can't, I join and weave. I weave in ends on the back side and I have never had anyone, even a knitter, see where those joins are. Sure, they do add a bit of density, but if you are knitting to a proper gauge, your fabric shouldn't be so thin as to notice.

As has been mentioned, there really are no "rules" in knitting, but there are techniques that will take your knitting from home made to hand made. Ultimately you need to do what works for you.



Chris
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b_bronstein@yahoo.com
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  07:17:43 AM  Show Profile Send b_bronstein@yahoo.com a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I knot and weave. I weave in the ends of the knot, one strand on the first row and the other strand on the way back.

If I can, I start the new strand on the edge of the row.
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