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roselady35
New Pal

23 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  07:36:49 AM  Show Profile Send roselady35 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I've created a huge number of ends to run in on my Log Cabin blanket from Mason Dixon. Not only are there many ends intrinsic to the pattern because of color changes, but I decided to double my alpaca cloud. Now I have 4 ends at each change instead of just 2. I don't want knots or 'thick' places, so I'm trying to think of something creative like crocheting them together and forming a little rosette or something. It even occurred to me that I could bring them through to the right side and make the embellishment. Of course, I'm no where near through with it, as once I reached the right width, I decided to lengthen it so it would be an adequate lap robe for my tall self. All suggestions welcomed.
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Marg in Mirror
Permanent Resident

Canada
3205 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  07:49:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Marg in Mirror's Homepage  Send Marg in Mirror a Yahoo! Message Send Marg in Mirror a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hmmm...I'm a Knotting Weaver. Weaving Knotter?

Well, what I mean is, I first knot the ends; later, when the article is finished, I go back, untie the knot, and weave the ends into the fabric with a darning needle or bodkin. After washing/blocking, nothing shows!

Marg (knotting and weaving) in Calgary

TLWKOTB
http://knitsonthebus.blogspot.com
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judye
New Pal

USA
37 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  07:51:21 AM  Show Profile Send judye a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi,

What I do is wind the new yarn, along with the old yarn aroundthe needle and strand the two end yarns along the back for about 4 or 5 stitches. You can't see it on the front and the back looks a little bit bulker in the stranded area, but so what. The front is beautiful.
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Luann
Permanent Resident

USA
2673 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  07:54:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit Luann's Homepage Send Luann a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Barbara Walker ties knots, Meg Swansen ties knots... I don't know who it is who made up the rule, but clearly it was made to be broken!

Luann (who usually just adds the new yarn and knits both strands for a couple of stitches but sometimes knots depending on what she feels like)

Knit and let knit!
Now with actual blogging!:
http://www.luannocracy.blogspot.com
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knittygurl@gmail.com
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  07:56:03 AM  Show Profile Send knittygurl@gmail.com a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I weave in my ends and then go around and through the last stitch I wove through, creating a knot without the hard bobble on the top. I learned this trick from doing embroidery so that there aren't a tangle of knots showing in the back of your work.
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PBELKNAP
Permanent Resident

USA
1136 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  08:00:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit PBELKNAP's Homepage Send PBELKNAP a Private Message  Reply with Quote
When I get to the end of a skein, I take the yarn and the new yarn and knit them together. I find one stitch with doubled-up yarn doesn't really show. Then I weave both ends in afterwards. Actually, I also do this for color changes when I do stripes in the round. It seems to soften that "jog" that one often gets, as your eye is seeing both colors and sort of blends them in.

*************************
PAM

WIP = Afghan (crochet), Knit Your Bit Scarf for the WWII Museum (knit - charity)

Done this year = Scrap Scarf (knit), Gloves (knit), Mittens (knit), Afghan (crochet)

If I could only do this for a living...
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Fairfield Beach
New Pal

16 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  08:10:42 AM  Show Profile Send Fairfield Beach a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Momtat has the best suggestions! One of her 3 almost always works. You might have mentioned that the size/type of yarn you are using dictates which of the joining techniques you choose. And knotting verses weaving in? - I had an instructor at RISD who used to say - "If it works, Dahlink, then that's the 'right' way to do it." There are no rules when it comes to creativity!!
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v-allknit
Seriously Hooked

India
741 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  08:28:29 AM  Show Profile Send v-allknit a Private Message  Reply with Quote
i also knot... always, and place and tighten the knot on the wrong side. weaving .... i find there is a little bit of thickening of the garment, may be i am not doing it right but its okay with me to knot.

there is no one looking the wrong side of my knitting :)

shruti

My finished projects

My blog

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CatherineM
Permanent Resident

USA
3363 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  08:58:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit CatherineM's Homepage Send CatherineM a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Depends on the fiber with me - with a wool, sure, I can usually knit the new yarn with the old for a few stitches and the join disappears, and the wool is "grabby" enough to hold it together permanently. With cotton and linen or anything slick textured, I pick a non-obtrusive spot on the wrong side and join with a nice little square knot, then weave in the ends later. I am more concerned with the finished object holding up under actual wearing conditions, including machine washing if applicable, than breaking some Knitting Overlord's made up rule. The trick is to think ahead when you start running out of the skein, so you can plan the join - but I think that applies no matter how you join it.

Catherine
http://yorkiedog.blogspot.com
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JenniK
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  09:14:17 AM  Show Profile Send JenniK a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm FREE... I've never tied knots. I thought for sure I would be cast out of the knitting world forever and ever amen. How wrong I've been all these years. I'm gonna knot with wild abandon now! Thanks for liberating me
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jmlammens@gmail.com
New Pal

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  09:20:15 AM  Show Profile Send jmlammens@gmail.com a Private Message  Reply with Quote
When I weave the yarn in I do it in a circular pattern. Sometimes it does looks like you have a little "bump" in the area on the right side. So I say do whatever looks the best, you are the one wearing it. A man on horseback will never notice.
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FibersFan
Warming Up

USA
53 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  10:08:17 AM  Show Profile Send FibersFan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I may set a temporary knot while I'm working but I realy attempt to undo them and weave wherever possible. It sometimes is not feasible. If there is ANY chance for the knot to work toward the front side I find a way not to knot.
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MindyO
Permanent Resident

USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  10:23:58 AM  Show Profile Send MindyO a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I usually overlap my tails by about 6-10 stitches each side of the yarn change. I catch my new yarn in a stitch, knit with old yarn weaving new tail as I go. Or should I say what would have been the tail had I not woven it in. Then when I have a couple inches of old strand I switch to new strand and weave in old tail. It works for me, once in awhile if I oull too tight it looks funky from the front, but usually it just blends in, and the best part is NO TAILS!!! I rarely go back and hide threads this way, usually just the begining thread if I didn't wind that in on my first pass, and of course the end tail. I also try to adapt all patterns to be completely seamless so I can avoid the dreaded sewing of the seams! I hate that part too!
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tink_r_bell
Chatty Knitter

USA
173 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  10:47:27 AM  Show Profile Send tink_r_bell a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Now I can come out of the naughty knotty kloset! I go back to my Girl Scout days, tie a square (reefer) knot and knit on, knot worrying. What good suggestions you all have.

Steph ;-}

To err is human, just try not to over do it.
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daddiesgirl
New Pal

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  12:23:29 PM  Show Profile Send daddiesgirl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
i have tried weaving ends and tying knot, i like the knotting at the end. i am always afraid the weave will come apart.
sometimes rules can be broken. and innovation found

Dee A Demby
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gwens@mstarmetro.net
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  2:01:27 PM  Show Profile Send gwens@mstarmetro.net a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I would definitely use knots when working with a cotton or similar-type fiber. In fact, if possible I'd seal the darn things with a drop of fabric glue as well.

I recently finished repairing (for the third time) a sweater, for a friend, that is a 'picture' sweater, done in intarsia with cotton yarns. This garment did have the yarns tied off, but the ends were cut very short and the cotton, being cotton, had worked its way loose - leaving not enough length to re-tie the ends - grrr!

I usually prefer weaving in ends because it's less bulky IMO, but not with cotton!

Gwen S.
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JulyGrrl


USA
Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  2:31:09 PM  Show Profile Send JulyGrrl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I generally weave in ends, but I've knotted in at least two projects. One was the Caps for Kids swirled ski hat that I just finished (the contrasting colored yarn ends all appeared inside what became the very top (below pom pom) of the hat. If I'd tried to weave them into the white background yarn, they would've shown through to the front, but there was empty space inside the top of the cap, so I made teeny square knots ONLY for the dark colors. I wove in all other ends.

The other time that I had to knot was in a scarf made in seed stitch for a friend, using Andean Silk Twist yarn (a discontinued yarn). It behaved very much like cotton or linen (slippery) and simply would not hold woven ends well. I had to knot AND glue to make sure that the ends wouldn't come apart. I only had Elmer's glue around, and since it is unlikely that the scarf will ever be washed, I figured that was fine. I've had no complaints from my recipient, and thankfully there were only two balls of yarn in the project, I think, so one join, or maybe two at the most.

In all other cases, I weave in my ends in a very slow, meticulous process, but I'm open to other options when the weaving itself poses new problems.
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Marlene
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  2:51:22 PM  Show Profile Send Marlene a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I generally do the spit splice or knit a couple of stitches with the ends of the old and the new together. Knots tend to be so final. Sometimes I untie the knot and redo it to make both sides smooth and then finish putting the garment together. However, anything works.
Marlene
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eldergirl
Permanent Resident

USA
1809 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  4:10:06 PM  Show Profile Send eldergirl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I think the weaving method was recommended back in the old days when wool frayed a bit or fulled a bit from use---the fibers clung well to each other. I learned in Scotland in the late '50's to graft the Meg Swanson way, with spit on the hands (love it!) This was with fingering, DK (brand new weight in those days), and particularly good with shetland wool. Now, with superwash sool (the fiber doesn't felt), cotton and all blends, and alpaca and dry-cleaning, it makes much more sense to try new ways.

My problem with knotting BEFORE knitting a row, is that more often than not, the tension around that stitch is off, and with unforgiving yarns that is sometimes permanent. My method is to knit until there are only a few inches of the old ball left, and then, without joining the wool, begin the next ball. Of course this leaves a terrifying insecure space where the two strands DON'T connect, but then I go ahead, work the next row, and once the fearful space is off the needles, I THEN tIe a knot, check;ing the front to get the tension of the stitch as good as I can get it. You can do this well with one-sided work, but with lace or scarves, it will have to be another method.

Whaddya think? This is my first post!

Anna
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kpollard@direcway.com
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2008 :  4:27:27 PM  Show Profile Send kpollard@direcway.com a Private Message  Reply with Quote
In Book 3 Color by Sally Melville, she uses a Weaver's knot. If done right it is tiny and can be knit or crocheted over. To knot or not is a choice. I think you can use different methods in different applications. A Weaver's Knot is used in many many of the fiber arts, as well as the untwist/retwist method. You need to find out what works with your type of yarn and the end result is what you want.
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