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knitsis
New Pal

Canada
14 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2006 :  2:37:21 PM  Show Profile Send knitsis a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Machine knitting is to hand knitting what machine sewing is to hand sewing. You can achieve beautiful results ( or multiple unfinished objects)with either, but mastering one does not prevent you from loving the other. Why not borrow one for a month or so. There are many knitting machines whose owners would be glad to lend them out and might even be glad to offer some instruction, too. Eases the guilt of not using them, for those who have consigned them to the attic.
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Moxy
Warming Up

USA
51 Posts

Posted - 10/17/2006 :  8:44:25 PM  Show Profile Send Moxy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have an LK 150 and it is fabulous.

It's easy and forgiving like a Bond, but the parts are better quality and don't give you the feeling you're using a toy like the Bond does.

However, if you should come across a Bond machine used and it's being sold inexpensively, it is a good first machine to do your learning on.
That said, I would upgrade as soon as you feel comfortable doing so. The parts and pieces on the Bond (keyplates, carriage, cast-on hem) are little better than junk. I replaced my cast-on hem twice in the 4 months I used it.

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Pauline J.
New Pal

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2007 :  10:37:44 AM  Show Profile Send Pauline J. a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hello: I am new to this forum. I have been knitting and crocheting for over 50 years. I also own two Studio machines, each with ribber. I recently started using them again after a 9-year lapse, so I am slowly refreshing myself.

I am confused however as to circular knitting, as in socks, etc. Can every knitting machine with a ribber do circular knitting? On my bulky, I have specific directions and have done some practising. But on my Studio 328 with standard gauge, there are no instructions that I can find. Is it just a matter of slip one row and knit one row or do some machines with ribbers not do tubular knitting? Thanks for any help. Any other tips / patterns for making socks would be appreciated. Pauline

Pauline J. Alley
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phlame
Permanent Resident

USA
1559 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2007 :  4:04:55 PM  Show Profile Send phlame a Private Message  Reply with Quote

quote:
Machine knitting is to hand knitting what machine sewing is to hand sewing


Knitsis...I have never heard that said as well!

Shirley Ryan, living in Dana Point, CA

...and dance like no one is watching!
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chestnut
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 06/09/2007 :  2:41:14 PM  Show Profile Send chestnut a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi
I'm looking for either knitting shop or a school besides FIT which offers machine knitting classes. Really interested in taking a class for the summer, seems hard to find a place.
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Passapman
New Pal

USA
15 Posts

Posted - 05/25/2010 :  06:47:59 AM  Show Profile  Send Passapman a Yahoo! Message Send Passapman a Private Message  Reply with Quote
How to learn to machine knit:

Regardless of the gauge of your machine, start with something SMALL, like a child's hat, or better still, a scarf. Remember when you learned to hand-knit, and it took forever to complete one row? The stitches were a jumble and it was hard to tell when you split the yarn, knit through the back of a stitch when you didn't mean to, purled when you wanted to knit or vice-versa?

On a machine you are looking to make sure the stitches have knit completely, are weighted evenly, have not formed any unwanted loops, and have not run. It takes time to train the eye. Use a smooth yarn, in the mid range of what your machine will handle. After a half dozen scarves and a dozen hats, try a basic stockinette sweater, again in a child's size. Smaller projects go more quickly and give you practice in casting on, binding off, increasing and decreasing, the stuff you need practice in doing.

When you want to try fancy stitch patterns, do a scarf or two in them first, so you learn how the stitches are supposed to form, the speed you need to run the carriage, all without worrying about increasing or decreasing.

What will I do with all those hats and scarves, you say? Charities will take them for the homeless and needy. It saves a lot of frustration and encourages you to keep learning. I can cast on, knit and bind of an adult hat in just under 30 min. Not everything I knit is about speed. Knit small until you gain confidence. You will soon be churning our complex designer garments.
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NastiJ
Permanent Resident

1288 Posts

Posted - 05/25/2010 :  2:56:28 PM  Show Profile Send NastiJ a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Passapman

How to learn to machine knit:



I'm sure the poster prior to your post would thank you, were it not for the fact that 1) her/his post is almost 3 years old; and, 2) he/she never posted anything in the ensuing time period, so it would appear that the poster is no longer active on this forum.

Nancy J.

"Learning how to knit was a snap.It was learning how to stop that nearly destroyed me." Erma Bombeck
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sruley2
New Pal

USA
5 Posts

Posted - 05/27/2010 :  1:35:05 PM  Show Profile Send sruley2 a Private Message  Reply with Quote

My wish list would include an automatic ball winder. I have a hand winder and swift but after five or six balls my arm gets tired and if the balls are over 500 yards each, then it becomes a pain. I am doing a "swing coat" that required many balls of yarn and it took me forever to wind them. Most of the automatic winders I've seen are over $150. Bummer, : ( Knittynut
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lella
Permanent Resident

9712 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2011 :  10:57:55 PM  Show Profile Send lella a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hello, my name is Lella and I'm still not using my machine. I posted the wrong machine numbers clear back in 2005 and have not even thought of the machine aside from moving it from under the bed to under the work table in another room.

Having said that, I would like to see if someone can tell me if double knit can be made on a 930e machine? I want to knit sock blanks for kool aid dyeing. Or do you just knit two strands together? Did I just answer my own question?

well, heck, have a good laugh on me.

Lella

Zippiknits

"Life is good if you don't weaken." Calvin Coolidge
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ValerieG
Chatty Knitter

107 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2011 :  12:38:50 PM  Show Profile Send ValerieG a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm assuming your machine is standard gauge (I don't know brothers)
Double knitting uses the ribber but for knitting blanks you just knit stockingstitch.
If 2 strands are too hard for your machine try every other needle. And knit at the largest stitch to make it easier for the dye to penetrate.
you can google lots of tutorials on the web
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Passapman
New Pal

USA
15 Posts

Posted - 03/15/2014 :  12:25:27 PM  Show Profile  Send Passapman a Yahoo! Message Send Passapman a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I learned to hand knit over 35 years ago, and bought my first knitting machine, a Singer 2310, (AKA White 1602/Superba S48) within 6 months of picking up needles. I have acquired a Passap E6000, a Bond, and a few antiques, one a Regina Princess.

I love the Bond because it truly mimics hand knitting due to the play in the needle slots and key plates. I can intersperse hand knitting with knitting on the Bond and the difference is undetectable.

There is a learning curve in mastering a knitting machine. The people who usually give up are those who have a low frustration tolerance and have not mastered anything that requires perseverance. If you have a mindset of "If others have mastered this, I can too, and I shall!" then you will be fine. If you think you want to machine knit because it looks effortless, easy and quick, better skip it.

You must do a gauge swatch and be able to calculate stitch and row gauge. This is even more important than in hand knitting. Machine knitting stitches are held apart on the latch hook needles and stretched down by the weighted hem. (Which, by the way, is not meant to endure the stress of the elastic cord being ripped out. Elastic thread is cheaper than replacing the hem.)

Knitting a sweater in 2/32 by hand is not a project, it is a career. That's why I have knitting machines. I knit 10 sweaters in sport to bulky weight on the Bond for each hand knit sweater in the same size and gauge.

The key to mastering the Bond is moving the carriage with the correct speed and pressure, along with making sure enough yarn is available for the row to be knitted. It's like trying to tell someone how to ride a bicycle. You do it until it clicks it, and then it is easy. You have to calmly persevere through the frustration, and then it becomes so simple you wonder how you could not do it before.

With knitting machines, there are a number of things to remember and once you master those, machine knitting becomes easy.
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ikkivan
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
532 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2014 :  08:05:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit ikkivan's Homepage Send ikkivan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
In early January, I bought a well used, but working, Passap e-6000 with many extras (motorized, stand, linker, etc.) because I thought my daughter wanted it. Someone who knew I am a knitter called me to see if I knew someone who might want it (she inherited it, for lack of a better term, had no room for it and certainly no idea of its value). My daughter was visiting at the time and we looked up enough info via Internet to realize what this was; we went to look at it, checked a few things out, and bought it for almost nothing. It was a big, heavy outfit (as in piano-sized) that took our husbands and my teenage grandsons to get it all moved to my house. I figured I'd try to learn the basics so I could help my daughter with it when the time came to move it to her out-of-state home.

Ha, found out she didn't want it at all, but was excited about it because she thought I wanted it, when I thought SHE wanted it. Through the Passap group on Ravelry and endless online educational videos, I learned more and more about it and its worth, and was able to identify many parts. The more I learned, the more I realized I did NOT want this thing taking up room in my home where I'd rather have a spinning wheel! So I sold it for lots more than I paid for it (saved for the spinning wheel, of course). From the responses I had on CraigList, I could probably have sold it for even more, but I'm not complaining.

I made sure the woman who bought it knew lots more than I did when I got it and that she could not run down to Walmart for some Red Heart Super Saver to thread it up. I understand through a mutual friend that she is learning fast and loving it, so that pleases me to no end.

I know these are just the thing for some folks, and more power to them, but not for me.

Donna, with intentions always bigger than her available time. (OkieDokieKnitter on Ravelry)
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ikkivan
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
532 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2014 :  08:08:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit ikkivan's Homepage Send ikkivan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Oh, PS ... there IS already a forum on here for knitting machine discussions, in case some of you hadn't noticed.

Donna, with intentions always bigger than her available time. (OkieDokieKnitter on Ravelry)
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